Defense Secretary James Mattis wants to ban cellphones in the Pentagon


Secretary of Defense James Mattis is reportedly considering banning personal cellphones from the Pentagon.

CNN reported Wednesday that Mattis wants to prohibit all U.S. military and civilian personnel from bringing their phones into the Defense Department headquarters, which is the largest office building in the world housing approximately 23,000 military and civilian workers. Mattis' request is under review, and a final decision has not yet been made.

Three Defense officials tasked with reviewing the issue told CNN the recent security breach of remote military bases by the fitness app Strava emphasized the need for the review, and it was ordered after Mattis communicated his goal of banning personal cellphones in the building.

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Retired Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis walks out after a meeting with President-elect Donald Trump at the Trump National Golf Club Bedminster clubhouse at Trump National Golf Club Bedminster in Bedminster Township, N.J. on Saturday, Nov. 19, 2016.

(Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump and Vice President-elect Mike Pence greet retired Marine General James Mattis for a meeting at the main clubhouse at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, New Jersey, U.S., November 19, 2016.

(REUTERS/Mike Segar)

Retired Marine General James Mattis departs as U.S. President-elect Donald Trump walks back into the main clubhouse following their meeting at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster following their meeting at the main clubhouse at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, New Jersey, U.S., November 19, 2016.

(REUTERS/Mike Segar)

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump stands with retired Marine Gen. James Mattis following their meeting at the main clubhouse at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, New Jersey, U.S., November 19, 2016.

(REUTERS/Mike Segar)

Retired Marine Corps Gen. James 'Jim' Mattis and Operation Gratitude Founder Carolyn Blashek speak during the DIRECTV and Operation Gratitude day of service at the fifth annual DIRECTV Dealer Revolution Conference at Caesars Palace on July 23, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada.

(Photo by Bryan Steffy/Getty Images for DIRECTV)

Egyptian Chief of Staff of the Armed Forces Sami Anan shakes hands with US Commander of the Central Command James Mattis during a meeting in Cairo on March 29, 2011.

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Retired Marine Corps Gen. James 'Jim' Mattis speaks during the DIRECTV and Operation Gratitude day of service at the fifth annual DIRECTV Dealer Revolution Conference at Caesars Palace on July 23, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada.

(Photo by Bryan Steffy/Getty Images for DIRECTV)

Retired Marine Corps Gen. James 'Jim' Mattis, former commander of the U.S. Central Command testifies before the House (Select) Intelligence Committee on 'Threats Posed by ISIL (Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant), AQ (al Qaeda), and Other Islamic Extremists' on Capitol Hill in Washington D.C., September 18, 2014. Yesterday the House approved President Obama's plan to train Syrian rebels to counter ISIL.

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Marine Corps General James Mattis, commander of the US Central Command, appears before the Senate Armed Services Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington DC, March 1, 2011. Enforcing a no-fly zone over Libya would first require a military operation to destroy the north African nation's air defense systems, top US commander General James Mattis warned Tuesday. A no-fly zone would require removing 'the air defense capability first,' Mattis told a Senate hearing. 'It would be a military operation,' he added.

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U.S. Joint Forces Command Commander James Mattis speaks during the 2010 Atlantic Council awards dinner at the Ritz Carlton Hotel on April 28, 2010 in Washington, DC.

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Kuwait Major General James Mattis, a high ranking Marine commander who also led troops into Afghanistan, visits Living Support Area one in Kuwait near the Iraqi border where troops are poised to begin a war against Iraq if called to do so by the President of the United States.

(Photo by Rick Loomis/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

U.S. Secretary of Defence Jim Mattis addresses a news conference during a NATO defence ministers meeting at the Alliance headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir
NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg and U.S. Secretary of Defence Jim Mattis attend a NATO defence ministers meeting at the Alliance headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir
U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis testifies to the House Armed Services Committee on "The National Defense Strategy and the Nuclear Posture Review" on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., February 6, 2018. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis reviews the guard of honour during a welcoming ceremony in Hanoi, Vietnam January 25, 2018. REUTERS/Kham
U.S. Secretary for Defense, Jim Mattis, sits opposite Britain's Secretary of State for Defence, Gavin Williamson, before a meeting at the Ministry of Defence (MoD) in central London, Britain November 10, 2017. REUTERS/Simon Dawson
U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis waits for the arrival of Turkish Defense Minister Nurettin Canikli prior to a meeting on the sidelines of a NATO defense ministers meeting at NATO headquarters in Brussels, Belgium November 8, 2017. Reuters/Virginia Mayo/Pool
U.S. President Donald Trump (R) and Defense Secretary James Mattis participates in a briefing with senior military leaders at the White House in Washington, U.S., October 5, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
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Mattis had also been briefed recently about the risk of wearable devices and the use of smartphones by military personnel. The Department of Defense is currently reviewing a policy regarding the issue, Pentagon spokesman Col. Rob Manning told reporters Monday.

Although there is no cellphone signal in most of the building, employees are required to leave their phones in locked boxes outside of any rooms with classified information or computers before entering. However, there have recently been improper use of cellphones in classified areas, two defense officials told CNN.

The discovery of the risk of cellphone vulnerabilities that led to the review is the same that led to the ban of staffers' personal cellphones in the White House's West Wing. That ban went into place earlier this month.

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WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 4: A member of the United States secret Service stands guard as Marine One carrying President Donald Trump takes off from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC on Monday, Dec. 04, 2017. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Members of the Secret Service wait for US President Donald Trump to walk to Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House December 15, 2017 in Washington, DC. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Members of the Secret Service stand on the North Lawn after US first lady Melania Trump received a Christmas tree during an event at the White House November 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 17: Members of the U.S. Secret Service stand on the roof of the West Wing prior to the arrival of Prime Minister of Greece Alexis Tsipras to the White House, October 17, 2017 in Washington, DC. A left-wing socialist, Tsipras was critical of Trump during his 2016 presidential campaign. But with tension high between the U.S. and Turkey, Trump and Tsipras are looking for renewed ties as they discuss defense, economic issues, energy security and cultural ties, according to the White House. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
A member of the Secret Service's uniformed division patrols Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House on October 27, 2017 in Washington, DC. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Marine One, carrying U.S. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump, departs the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, Oct. 13, 2017. Trump plans to visit the U.S. Secret Service training facility in Beltsville, Maryland. Photographer: Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 2: (AFP OUT) Members of secret service counter-assault teams get ready for U.S. President Donald Trump departure from the White House September 2, 2017 in Washington, DC. The President and first lady are traveling to Texas to visit individuals impacted by Hurricane Harvey. (Photo by Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 2: (AFP OUT) Secret service agents get in position prior to U.S. President Donald Trump departure on Marine One from the White House September 2, 2017 in Washington, DC. The President and first lady are traveling to Texas to visit individuals impacted by Hurricane Harvey. (Photo by Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 28: U.S. Secret Service Police officers stand guard in the rain outside the White House on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington Friday July 28, 2017. (Photo by J. Lawler Duggan/For The Washington Post via Getty Images)
A member of the Secret Service patrols in front of the White House, illuminated in pink for Breast Cancer awareness month, in Washington, DC on October 1, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
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