EPA chief Scott Pruitt in 2016 said Trump posed a greater threat to Constitution than Obama

WASHINGTON, Jan 30 (Reuters) - Scott Pruitt, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency, on Tuesday sought to distance himself from comments he made in a 2016 radio interview in which said Donald Trump would pose a threat to the U.S. Constitution if he ever became president.

The recording of the interview was released on Tuesday by the liberal group Documented, which tracks corporate influence in politics, just as Pruitt appeared before his first Senate hearing since becoming confirmed last year as the top U.S. environmental official.

"I believe that Donald Trump in the White House will be more abusive to the Constitution (than then-President Barack Obama), and that's saying a lot," Pruitt said in February 2016 during his appearance on the Pat Campbell Show in Oklahoma.

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Gary Cohn, director of the U.S. National Economic Council, walks toward Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, July 5, 2017. President Donald Trump's encounter this week at the Group of 20 summit with Russian leader Vladimir Putin is raising concerns among veteran American diplomats and analysts about a mismatch between a U.S. president new to global affairs and a wily former Soviet spymaster. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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Pruitt, then Oklahoma's attorney general, at the time was supporting Jeb Bush, the former Florida governor who was among those vying with Trump for the Republican presidential nomination.

Pruitt went on to say in the interview that if Trump were elected, the businessman-turned-politician would take "unapologetic steps to use executive power to confront Congress in a way that is truly unconstitutional."

During the hearing before the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, Democratic Senator Sheldon Whitehouse asked Pruitt if he recalled the interview. Pruitt said he did not.

Regarding the content of his 2016 remarks, Pruitt said he does not "echo that today at all."

Pruitt has provoked controversy as Trump's EPA chief, praised by conservatives and criticized by liberals for rolling back environmental regulations put in place under Democrat Obama and for his role in Trump's decision to abandon the 2015 Paris global climate change accord.

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He is one of several Trump appointees who were critical of the president when he was a candidate. For example, Energy Secretary Rick Perry in 2015 said Trump was a "cancer on conservatism" and would ruin the Republican Party.

At Tuesday's hearing, Democrats also pressed Pruitt on his agenda at the EPA of rolling back environmental regulations, and asked him for details on how he would carry out two of his stated priorities - combating lead in drinking water and cleaning up so-called Superfund industrial pollution sites.

Republicans at the hearing praised Pruitt for cutting back what they called regulatory red tape that choking rural communities.

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Director of Environmental Protection Agency Scott Pruitt
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Director of Environmental Protection Agency Scott Pruitt

Scott Pruitt, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), speaks to employees of the Agency in Washington, U.S., February 21, 2017.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Scott Pruitt, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), greets employees of the agency in Washington, U.S., February 21, 2017.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Director of Environmental Protection Agency Scott Pruitt is sworn in by Justice Samuel Alito as his wife Marilyn holds a bible during ceremony at the Executive Office in Washington, U.S., February 17, 2017.

(REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

Scott Pruitt, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), greets employees of the agency in Washington, U.S., February 21, 2017.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, U.S. President-elect Donald Trump's pick as head of the Environmental Protectional Agency, meets with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., January 6, 2017.

(REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein)

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt testifies before a Senate Environment and Public Works Committee confirmation hearing on his nomination to be administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency in Washington, U.S., January 18, 2017.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt (R), U.S. President-elect Donald Trump's pick to lead the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), meets with Senator Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV) (L) in her office on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. January 4, 2017.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, U.S. President-elect Donald Trump's pick as head of the Environmental Protectional Agency, meets with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., January 6, 2017.

(REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein)

Oklahoma Farm Bureau Vice President of Public Policy John R.H. Collison (L) meets with Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt (R) to discuss state water issues at the attorney generals office in Oklahoma City, July 29, 2014.

(REUTERS/Nick Oxford)

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt in a meeting at his office in Oklahoma City, July 29, 2014. 

(REUTERS/Nick Oxford)

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(Reporting by Valerie Volcovici; Editing by Will Dunham)

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