We could see an entirely different Trump at the State of the Union address

  • President Donald Trump will give his first-ever State of the Union address on Tuesday.
  • A source says to expect a different kind of Trump, much like the polished speech he gave at Davos.
  • Trump could use the lengthy address to smooth over partisan differences and focus on a future that largely requires bipartisan support.
  • But Trump frequently veers off script and gets himself into hot water, the question before the State of the Union is which Trump will turn up?

President Donald Trump will give his first-ever State of the Union address before Congress and the nation on Tuesday, and early reports indicate we may see a very different Trump.

"The partisan fights, like Obamacare and tax cuts, are behind. Now everything requires cooperation and agreement," a source with knowledge Trump told Axios' Mike Allen.

"Time to appear as commander-in-chief and leader of the whole nation. So expect calls to patriotism and national security and national greatness," the source added.

With tax reform done and healthcare seemingly off the table, bipartisan issues like immigration reform and keeping the government open require support from Democrats and Republicans in Congress.

RELATED: A look at Trump delivering speeches through the years

24 PHOTOS
Trump delivering speeches through the years
See Gallery
Trump delivering speeches through the years
U.S. President Donald Trump gestures as he delivers a speech during the World Economic Forum (WEF) annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland January 26, 2018. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse
U.S. President Donald Trump delivers a speech on tax reform legislation at the White House in Washington, U.S., December 13, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the Utah State Capitol, where he announced big cuts to Utah's sprawling wilderness national monuments, in Salt Lake City, Utah, U.S., December 4, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump delivers his speech as he and China's President Xi Jinping meet business leaders at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, November 9, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
U.S. President Donald Trump delivers a speech at the National Assembly in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, Nov. 8, 2017. REUTERS/Lee Jin-man/Pool
U.S. President Donald Trump delivers a speech on tax reform in Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S., September 27, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
President Donald Trump turns his back to the crowd during his speech at a rally for Senator Luther Strange at the Von Braun Centre in Huntsville, Alabama, U.S., September 22, 2017. REUTERS/Marvin Gentry
US. President Donald Trump gives a public speech at Krasinski Square, in Warsaw, Poland July 6, 2017. REUTERS/Kacper Pempel
U.S. President Donald Trump delivers a speech on US-Cuba relations at the Manuel Artime Theater in Miami, Florida, U.S., June 16, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Donald Trump arrives to deliver a speech on US-Cuba relations at the Manuel Artime Theater in Miami, Florida, U.S., June 16, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Donald Trump delivers a speech during Arab-Islamic-American Summit in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia May 21, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President-elect Donald Trump speaks during a USA Thank You Tour event in Orlando, Florida, U.S., December 16, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
U.S. President-elect Donald Trump speaks at the USA Thank You Tour event at the Wisconsin State Fair Exposition Center in West Allis, Wisconsin, U.S., December 13, 2016. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
U.S. President-Elect Donald Trump speaks at event at Carrier HVAC plant in Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S., December 1, 2016. REUTERS/Chris Bergin
U.S. President-elect Donald Trump speaks at his election night rally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
U.S. President elect Donald Trump speaks at election night rally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President elect Donald Trump speaks at election night rally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks at his final campaign event at the Devos Place in Grand Rapids, Michigan, U.S. November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
U.S. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump gestures as he speaks at a campaign rally in Raleigh, North Carolina November 7, 2016. REUTERS/Chris Keane
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S. November 7, 2016. REUTERS/Chris Keane
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in Sarasota, Florida, U.S. November 7, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump attends a campaign rally in Detroit, Michigan, U.S. November 6, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump rallies with supporters in a cargo hangar at Minneapolis-Saint Paul International Airport in Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S. November 6, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump attends a campaign rally in at the Florida State Fairgrounds in Tampa, Florida, U.S. November 5, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Additionally, with the 2018 midterm elections jeopardizing the GOP's control of the House and Senate, Trump may look to play up the Republicans' success and attempt to appear above the fray with cross-aisle finger pointing.

For those reasons, the Trump that addresses the union on Tuesday may look more like the Trump that spoke at Davos, and less like the Trump that visits rallies to bash his opponents. 

However, some GOP analysts say despite Trump's best efforts to present an agreeable message, his old habits may kick in.

Can Trump stick to the script?

"He has little message discipline," Ari Fleischer, a former press secretary for President George W. Bush told the Associated Press.

"Virtually every time he moves the ball far down the field, he seems to derail himself with a tweet days later instead of building on the momentum."

Trump is known to react strongly to negative stories about himself, and could easily become derailed by or mired in a conversation that has little to do with achieving his material political goals, as was the case in his months-long admonishment of the NFL for the behavior of players during the national anthem. 

But unlike his tweets that dominate mini news cycles across all cable news networks, the State of the Union format demands more content, as they often last around one hour. Also, the speech is uninterrupted by questions and answers, allowing Trump to possibly control the message closely, as he did at Davos.

"It's one of the few events presidents conduct in which 30 to 40 million or more Americans are watching," Fleischer said.

"There is hardly another moment of presidential exposure as big as this one, and it's one when the president and his staff have all the control. They are not reacting to events. They are controlling them, and they need to deliver."

At Davos, Trump took on the role of cheerleader for the US, declaring the country "open for business" and deriding "small thinking."

With the State of the Union, Trump has the opportunity to tout his successes and smooth over rough patches, potentially addressing or defending some of his tendencies that are frequently seen as racist or hurtful — but will he?

NOW WATCH: Here's how the map of the United States has changed in 200 years

See Also:

SEE ALSO: The US ambassador to the UN was upset by the Grammys' 'Fire and Fury' skit after she shot down a 'disgusting' rumor in the book

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.