Researchers find a 1.7-billion-year-old piece of North America clinging onto Australia 

Geologists recently discovered that there’s a roughly 1.7-billion-year-old piece of North America clinging onto Queensland, Australia. 

Testing of rocks in Australia’s Georgetown region revealed signatures that are much like those found in Canada and bear absolutely no resemblance to anything else known in Australia today.

“Our research shows that about 1.7 billion years ago, Georgetown rocks were deposited into a shallow sea when the region was part of North America,” Adam Nordsvan, one of the Curtin University scientists involved in the study, noted. “Georgetown then broke away from North America and collided with the Mount Isa region of northern Australia around 100 million years later.”

“This was a critical part of global continental reorganization when almost all continents on Earth assembled to form the supercontinent called Nuna,” he further commented.

When Nuna later broke apart, the rogue North American section went with Australia. 

According to the team, this finding will help reveal more about how the early supercontinent formed.

18 PHOTOS
Cobbold Gorge in Australia
See Gallery
Cobbold Gorge in Australia
Cobbold Gorge, Gulf Savannah Region, Far North Queensland, Australia
Cobbold Gorge, extremely narrow, in places merely two meters wide, with spectacular 30-metre cliffs, A series of waterholes and rock falls extends for about 6 km but only the last 500 m is accessible by flat-bottom boat, Robin Hood Station, near Georgetown, Gulf Savannah, Queensland, Australia. (Photo by: Auscape/UIG via Getty Images)
Cobbold Gorge, extremely narrow, in places merely two meters wide, with spectacular 30-metre cliffs, A series of waterholes and rock falls extends for about 6 km but only the last 500 m is accessible by flat-bottom boat, Robin Hood Station, near Georgetown, Gulf Savannah, Queensland, Australia. (Photo by: Auscape/UIG via Getty Images)
Cobbold Gorge, extremely narrow, in places merely two meters wide, with spectacular 30-metre cliffs, A series of waterholes and rock falls extends for about 6 km but only the last 500 m is accessible by flat-bottom boat, Robin Hood Station, near Georgetown, Gulf Savannah, Queensland, Australia. (Photo by: Auscape/UIG via Getty Images)
Cobbold Gorge, extremely narrow, in places merely two meters wide, with spectacular 30-metre cliffs, A series of waterholes and rock falls extends for about 6 km but only the last 500 m is accessible by flat-bottom boat, Robin Hood Station, near Georgetown, Gulf Savannah, Queensland, Australia. (Photo by: Auscape/UIG via Getty Images)
Cobbold Gorge, extremely narrow, in places merely two meters wide, with spectacular 30-metre cliffs, A series of waterholes and rock falls extends for about 6 km but only the last 500 m is accessible by flat-bottom boat, Robin Hood Station, near Georgetown, Gulf Savannah, Queensland, Australia. (Photo by: Auscape/UIG via Getty Images)
Cobbold Gorge, extremely narrow, in places merely two meters wide, with spectacular 30-metre cliffs, A series of waterholes and rock falls extends for about 6 km but only the last 500 m is accessible by flat-bottom boat, Robin Hood Station, near Georgetown, Gulf Savannah, Queensland, Australia. (Photo by: Auscape/UIG via Getty Images)
Cobbold Gorge, an old prospector's campsite, Robin Hood Station, near Georgetown, Gulf Savannah, Queensland, Australia. (Photo by: Auscape/UIG via Getty Images)
Cobbold Gorge, extremely narrow, in places merely two meters wide, with spectacular 30-metre cliffs, A series of waterholes and rock falls extends for about 6 km but only the last 500 m is accessible by flat-bottom boat, Robin Hood Station, near Georgetown, Gulf Savannah, Queensland, Australia. (Photo by: Auscape/UIG via Getty Images)
Cobbold Gorge, grinding stone, one of the remnants of an Aboriginal campsite. Robin Hood Station, near Georgetown, Gulf Savannah, Queensland, Australia. (Photo by Auscape/UIG via Getty Images)
Cobbold Gorge, extremely narrow, in places merely two metres wide, with spectacular 30-m cliffs. A series of waterholes and rock falls extends for about 6 km but only the last 500 m is accessible by flat-bottom boat. Robin Hood Station, near Georgetown, Gulf Savannah, Queensland, Australia. (Photo by Auscape/UIG via Getty Images)
Cobbold Gorge, grinding stone, one of the remnants of an Aboriginal campsite, Robin Hood Station, near Georgetown, Gulf Savannah, Queensland, Australia. (Photo by: Auscape/UIG via Getty Images)
Cobbold Gorge, extremely narrow, in places merely two meters wide, with spectacular 30-metre cliffs, A series of waterholes and rock falls extends for about 6 km but only the last 500 m is accessible by flat-bottom boat, Robin Hood Station, near Georgetown, Gulf Savannah, Queensland, Australia. (Photo by: Auscape/UIG via Getty Images)
A guide with visitors to Robin Hood Station and its Cobbold Gorge, near Georgetown, Gulf Savannah, Queensland, Australia. (Photo by Auscape/UIG via Getty Images)
Cobbold Gorge is a hidden gem in Queensland's remote outback.
Cobbold Gorge, accessible only by boat on a guided tour, is hidden on a remote Queensland cattle station.
Stunning Cobbold Gorge is an oasis on a private cattle station in remote Outback Queensland.
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Read Full Story