Amazon pulls racist 'slavery gets s**t done' products from website

Amazon has removed a series of products from its website that bore a slogan praising slavery.

The online retailer faced a backlash this week after a third-party seller named Styleart listed a number of items emblazoned with the phrase “Slavery Gets Shit Done” on Amazon’s Marketplace platform. The products included laptop cases, mugs, bags, children’s T-shirts and bibs, according to reports.

Human rights organization Anti-Slavery International described the items as “absolutely shocking” and urged Amazon to “do better to control what you sell.” Some customers also called for a boycott of the website.

“One in four of the estimated 40 million people in slavery today are children,” said David Westlake, the CEO of British anti-slavery organization International Justice Mission UK.

Today, children the same age as those modeling these T-shirts will be forced to work long, back-breaking hours for no pay,” he told Global Citizen. “They will be living in desperate conditions where starvation, beatings and sleep deprivation are common.”

RELATED: White supremacy in America

10 PHOTOS
White supremacy in America
See Gallery
White supremacy in America
A member of the Ku Klux Klan gestures as he marches during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. A Ku Klux Klan chapter and an African-American group planned overlapping demonstrations on Saturday outside the South Carolina State House, where state officials removed the Confederate battle flag last week. REUTERS/Chris Keane
A member of a white supremacy group gives the fascist salute during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES) REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A member of a white supremacy group shouts during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A member of a white supremacy group stands behind a flag with a swastika during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A member of the Ku Klux Klan who says his name is Gary Munker poses for a photo during an interview with AFP in Hampton Bays, New York on November 22, 2016. Munker says his local branch of the KKK, which has recently placed recruitment flyers on car windshields on Long Island, has seen around 1,000 enquiries from people interested in joining since the election of Donald Trump. / AFP / William EDWARDS (Photo credit should read WILLIAM EDWARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
Members of a white supremacy group give the fascist salute during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A supporter of the Ku Klux Klan is seen with his tattoos during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Keane
A member of the Ku Klux Klan gestures as he listens to the crowd while carrying a Confederate flag during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Keane
A member of the Ku Klux Klan yells during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. A Ku Klux Klan chapter and an African-American group planned overlapping demonstrations on Saturday outside the South Carolina State House, where state officials removed the Confederate battle flag last week.REUTERS/Chris Keane
Members of the Ku Klux Klan yell as they fly Confederate flags during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. A Ku Klux Klan chapter and an African-American group planned overlapping demonstrations on Saturday outside the South Carolina State House, where state officials removed the Confederate battle flag last week. REUTERS/Chris Keane? TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Amazon has pulled the items from sale from all of its sites, a spokesman for the retailer told Reuters. “All Marketplace sellers must follow our selling guidelines and those who don’t will be subject to action including potential removal of their account,” he added.

  • This article originally appeared on HuffPost.
Read Full Story