Trump's potentially trillion-dollar infrastructure plan has reportedly leaked

  • President Donald Trump touted fixing America's crumbling infrastructure on the campaign trail.
  • Axios apparently got a copy of his six-page infrastructure plan.


President Donald Trump's potentially trillion-dollar infrastructure plan has leaked, according to Axios, which provided the six-page document on its website.

Though the plan does not cite any specific dollar amounts, it details how 97.05% of the money would be spent on various programs to improve the US's lagging infrastructure.

Exactly half of the money appropriated for the bill will go to the Infrastructure Incentives Initiative, which "encourages state, local and private investment in core infrastructure by providing incentives in the form of grants" which can cover up to 20% of the project's costs, according to the document.

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President Trump discusses infrastructure
U.S. President Donald Trump takes the stage to deliver remarks on infrastructure improvements, at the Department of Transportation in Washington, U.S. June 9, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. President Donald Trump shows off a large binder with highway permitting documents on the stage during his remarks on infrastructure improvements, at the Department of Transportation in Washington, U.S. June 9, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump shows off a large binder with highway permitting documents on the stage during his remarks on infrastructure improvements, at the Department of Transportation in Washington, U.S. June 9, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump concludes his remarks on infrastructure improvements, at the Department of Transportation in Washington, U.S. June 9, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump (R), flanked by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke (L) and Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao (2nd L) delivers remarks on infrastructure improvements, at the Department of Transportation in Washington, U.S. June 9, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump arrives at the Infrastructure Summit with Governors and Mayors at the White House in Washington, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the Infrastructure Summit with Governors and Mayors at the White House in Washington, U.S. June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. President Donald Trump arrives at the Infrastructure Summit with Governors and Mayors at the White House in Washington, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. President Donald Trump is presented with a hat before the Infrastructure Summit with Governors and Mayors at the White House in Washington, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. President Donald Trump gestures during the Infrastructure Summit with Governors and Mayors at the White House in Washington, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
Vornado Realty Trust founder Steve Roth (2nd R) and LeFrak CEO Richard Lefrak (R) join U.S. President Donald Trump as he delivers remarks on his potential infrastructure proposals during an event at the Rivertowne Marina in Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S. June 7, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke (L), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt (2nd L) and Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue (R) join U.S. President Donald Trump as he delivers remarks on his potential infrastructure proposals during an event at the Rivertowne Marina in Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S. June 7, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump delivers remarks on his potential infrastructure proposals during an event at the Rivertowne Marina in Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S. June 7, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump delivers remarks on his potential infrastructure proposals during an event at the Rivertowne Marina in Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S. June 7, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump waves to the crowd after announcing his $1 trillion infrastructure plan during a rally alongside the Ohio River at the Rivertowne Marina in Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S. June 7, 2017. REUTERS/John Sommers II TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. President Donald Trump waves to the crowd after announcing his $1 trillion infrastructure plan during a rally alongside the Ohio River at the Rivertowne Marina in Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S. June 7, 2017. REUTERS/John Sommers II
U.S. President Donald Trump delivers remarks on U.S. transportation infrastructure projects in front of coal barges at Rivertowne Marina in Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S., June 7, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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A quarter of the money would go to improving infrastructure in rural areas by incentivizing investment in transportation or utilities like water treatment and broadband.

Ten percent of the money has been set aside for "exploratory and ground-breaking ideas that have more risk than standard infrastructure projects but offer a larger reward profile," wherein the government would offer to pay 80% of capital construction costs, 30% of trials to demonstrate the technology, and 50% of post-demonstration planning costs.

Largely built decades ago, US infrastructure is falling apart. One-third of roads are in poor condition, 56,000 of the 612,000 bridges are structurally deficient, and 14,000 of the 83,000 dams in the US have "high hazard potential." Experts estimate it will cost roughly $1 trillion to fix.

A White House spokeswoman told Axios she wouldn't comment on the document, and that the administration would present its plan in the "near future."

Read the full document at Axios »

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