Skydiver killed after landing on roof of California home

A skydiver is dead after landing on the roof of a family's home after his parachute failed to deploy.

The man, who has not been identified, jump from the plane and landed on top of a home in Perris, Calif., according to an incident information fact sheet released by the Riverside County Fire Department.

Firefighters were called to the residence just before 3 p.m. Monday.

KTLA reported that the victim was pronounced dead at the scene within 30 minutes.

Ali Muhassen, the witness who called paramedics to the scene, told the publication he did not see a parachute deploy or open.

RELATED: 1952: Daredevil attempts to break speed record on Loch Ness

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1952: Daredevil attempts to break speed record on Loch Ness
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1952: Daredevil attempts to break speed record on Loch Ness
Engineers George Bristow of De Havilland (standing, left) and Hugh Jones of Vospers (right) towing the jet powered speed boat 'Crusader' on Loch Ness, Scotland, during an attempt on the world water speed record by British racing driver John Cobb (1899 - 1952), September 1952. Designed by Reid Railton and Peter Du cane and built by Vospers, 'Crusader' crashed after reaching a speed of 206 mph, killing Cobb. Original publication: Picture Post - 6097 - Crusader Passes - pub. 1952 (Photo by Raymond Kleboe/Picture Post/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
British racing driver John Cobb (right) and engineers with Cobb's jet-powered speed boat 'Crusader' at New Malden, Surrey, 22nd August 1952. Designed by Peter Du Cane and Reid Railton, built by Vospers, and powered by a De Havilland Ghost engine, 'Crusader' will be used by Cobb in an attempt on the world water speed record at Loch Ness in September. Original publication: Picture Post - 6097 - Crusader Passes - pub. 1952 (Photo by Raymond Kleboe/Picture Post/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
The jet powered speed boat 'Crusader' is towed through the streets of Aberdeen on its way to Loch Ness, where it is to be used in John Cobb's world water speed record attempt, September 1952. Designed by Reid Railton and built by Vospers, 'Crusader' crashed after reaching a speed of 206 mph, killing Cobb. Original publication: Picture Post - 6097 - Crusader Passes - pub. 1952 (Photo by Raymond Kleboe/Picture Post/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
The jet powered speed boat 'Crusader' is towed through the streets of Aberdeen on its way to Loch Ness, where it is to be used in John Cobb's world water speed record attempt, September 1952. Designed by Reid Railton and built by Vospers, 'Crusader' later crashed after reaching a speed of 206 mph, killing Cobb. Original publication: Picture Post - 6097 - Crusader Passes - pub. 1952 (Photo by Raymond Kleboe/Picture Post/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
British racing driver John Cobb's jet powered speed boat 'Crusader' is prepared for a trial run on Loch Ness, Scotland, during an attempt on the world water speed record, September 1952. Designed by Reid Railton and Peter Du Cane and built by Vospers, 'Crusader' crashed after reaching a speed of 206 mph, killing Cobb. Original publication: Picture Post - 6097 - Crusader Passes - pub. 1952 (Photo by Raymond Kleboe/Picture Post/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
John Cobb's jet-powered speed boat 'Crusader' is lowered into the water at Loch Ness, Scotland, for a trial run before his attempt on the world water speed record, September 1952. Cobb was later killed in his attempt that when 'Crusader' crashed after reaching a speed of 206 mph. Original publication: Picture Post - 6097 - Crusader Passes - pub. 1952 (Photo by Raymond Kleboe/Picture Post/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Boat designer Commander Peter Du Cane (left) and Hugh Jones of boat-builders Vospers (centre), make alterations to the step on which the jet-powered speed boat 'Crusader' runs at speed, Loch Ness, September 1952. The boat was used by British racing driver John Cobb (1899 - 1952) in his attempt on the world water speed record. Cobb was killed when 'Crusader' crashed after reaching a speed of 206 mph. Original publication: Picture Post - 6097 - Crusader Passes - pub. 1952 (Photo by Raymond Kleboe/Picture Post/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
A group of children look on as British racing driver John Cobb (1899 - 1952 in boat, 3rd from left) brings his jet powered speed boat 'Crusader' back to the shore of Loch Ness, Scotland, during an attempt on the world water speed record, September 1952. Designed by Reid Railton and Peter Du Cane and built by Vospers, 'Crusader' crashed after reaching a speed of 206 mph, killing Cobb. Original publication: Picture Post - 6097 - Crusader Passes - pub. 1952 (Photo by Raymond Kleboe/Picture Post/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
British racing driver John Cobb's jet powered speed boat 'Crusader' is given an engine test on Temple Pier by Loch Ness, Scotland, during an attempt on the world water speed record, September 1952. Designed by Reid Railton and Peter Du Cane and built by Vospers, 'Crusader' crashed after reaching a speed of 206 mph, killing Cobb. Original publication: Picture Post - 6097 - Crusader Passes - pub. 1952 (Photo by Raymond Kleboe/Picture Post/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
One time world land speed record holder John Cobb in a boat on Loch Ness, where he died attempting to beat the world water speed record when his boat 'Crusader' exploded. Original Publication: Picture Post - 6097 - Crusader Passes - pub.1952 Original Publication: People Disc - HC0282 (Photo by Raymond Kleboe/Getty Images)
11th October 1952: Commander Peter Du Cane (left), managing director of Vosper's the builders of the jet boat 'Crusader' watching the first engine test. John Cobb was killed when he tried to attempt the world water speed record at Loch Ness when 'Crusader' exploded after reaching a speed of 206 mph. Original Publication: Picture Post - 6097 - Crusader Passes - pub. 1952 (Photo by Raymond Kleboe/Picture Post/Getty Images)
De Havilland engineers George Bristow (left) and J. Bennets working on the De Havilland Ghost engine of John Cobb's jet-powered speed boat 'Crusader', during his attempt on the world water speed record at Loch Ness, Scotland, September 1952. Original publication: Picture Post - 6097 - Crusader Passes - pub. 1952 (Photo by Raymond Kleboe/Picture Post/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
11th October 1952: Hugh Jones making adjustments to the jet boat 'Crusader' John Cobb was killed when he tried to attempt the world water speed record at Loch Ness when 'Crusader' exploded after reaching a speed of 206 mph. Original Publication: Picture Post - 6097 - Crusader Passes - pub. 1952 (Photo by Raymond Kleboe/Picture Post/Getty Images)
British racing driver John Cobb's jet powered speed boat 'Crusader' gets clear of the tender, Astrid, as she sets out on a trial run on Loch Ness, Scotland, during an attempt on the world water speed record, September 1952. Designed by Reid Railton and Peter Du Cane and built by Vospers, 'Crusader' crashed after reaching a speed of 206 mph, killing Cobb. Original publication: Picture Post - 6097 - Crusader Passes - pub. 1952 (Photo by Raymond Kleboe/Picture Post/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
British racing driver John Cobb (1899 - 1952, centre) and colleagues on board the fishing smack Astrid, for a first look at Loch Ness, Scotland, before his attempt on the world water speed record in the jet powered speed boat 'Crusader', September 1952. 'Crusader' later crashed after reaching a speed of 206 mph, killing Cobb. Original publication: Picture Post - 6097 - Crusader Passes - pub. 1952 (Photo by Raymond Kleboe/Picture Post/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
29th September 1952: John Cobb, one-time holder of the world land speed record, with two of his advisers on Loch Ness, where he was later killed when his jet boat 'Crusader' exploded during an attempt at the world water speed record. Cobb began his racing career in cars and won the 500-mile race at Brooklands in 1935 and 1937, before serving in the Air Force and returning to race speed boats. Original Publication: Picture Post - 6097 - Crusader Passes - pub. 1952 (Photo by Raymond Kleboe/Picture Post/Getty Images)
11th October 1952: Time-keepers at the start of John Cobb's attempt on the world's water speed record on Loch Ness. His Railton designed jet boat 'Crusader' exploded after reaching a speed of 206 mph and he was killed. Original Publication: Picture Post - 6097 - Crusader Passes - pub. 1952 (Photo by Raymond Kleboe/Picture Post/Getty Images)
29th September 1952: John Cobb sets out in the Railton-designed jet boat 'Crusader' to attempt a water speed world record at Loch Ness on 29th September. He was killed when 'Crusader' exploded after reaching a speed of 206 mph. Cobb began his racing career in cars and won the 500-mile race at Brooklands in 1935 and 1937, before serving in the Air Force and returning to race speed boats. Original Publication: Picture Post - 6097 - Crusader Passes - pub. 1952 (Photo by Raymond Kleboe/Picture Post/Getty Images)
11th October 1952: Mrs Cobb listens in on the ship-to-shore radio telephone while watching her husband John Cobb try to break the world water speed record. Original Publication: Picture Post - 6097 - Crusader Passes - pub. 1952 (Photo by Raymond Kleboe/Picture Post/Getty Images)
A timekeeper fires a signal flare during John Cobb's attempt on the world water speed record in the jet powered speed boat 'Crusader', on Loch Ness, Scotland, September 1952. Original publication: Picture Post - 6097 - Crusader Passes - pub. 1952 (Photo by Raymond Kleboe/Picture Post/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
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He added that the solo skydiver appeared to be unconscious as he hurled toward the ground.

"No movement at all, his head was down, neck down, arms just flailing around," Muhassen said, recalling the sight.

Muhassen believed the victim was going to land in his backyard.

Instead, he landed on a neighbor's roof after an emergency parachute deployed moments before his body made contact.

"I guess his emergency chute deployed, and it kind of picked him up a little bit and it took him to the house behind us," Muhassen told the outlet.

Per the Riverside County Fire Department's report, an investigation into the incident is being handled by the local sheriff's department.

It's unclear what facility the victim was skydiving with, though KTLA noted that the home on which his body was found was just a few miles from Skydive Perris, which operates out of the Perris Valley Airport.

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