Poll: Democrats, Trump to blame for government shutdown

Americans blame President Donald Trump and congressional Democrats about equally for the three-day government shutdown that ended Monday with another stopgap spending measure, according to a new NBC News|SurveyMonkey poll.

About 4 in 10 people, or 39 percent, think Democrats in Congress are responsible for the shutdown, which began early Saturday morning after Senate Democrats, citing insufficient progress on negotiations over the fate of young immigrants covered by the DACA program, withheld their support for a deal.

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Government shutdown extends into Monday
A jogger runs pas the U.S. Capitol during the third day of a government shutdown in Washington, U.S. January 22, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 22 : (L to R) Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) and Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ) talk to reporters after a meeting with a bipartisan group of moderate Senators in Collins' office on Capitol Hill, January 22, 2018 in Washington, DC. Lawmakers are continuing to seek a deal to end the government shutdown, now in day three. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn (R-TX) speaks to reporters during the third day of a shut down of the federal government on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., January 22, 2018. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) walks from the Senate floor during the third day of a shut down of the federal government on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., January 22, 2018. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 22 : (L to R) Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) and Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ) talk to reporters after a meeting with a bipartisan group of moderate Senators in Collins' office on Capitol Hill, January 22, 2018 in Washington, DC. Lawmakers are continuing to seek a deal to end the government shutdown, now in day three. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
A notice about the government shutdown is seen on the door of the men's bathroom at the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial on the first full week of the government shutdown in Washington, DC on January 22, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
An idle forklift and building supplies are seen infront of the Lincoln Memorial on the first full week of the government shutdown in Washington, DC on January 22, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 22: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) arrives at the U.S. Capitol on January 22, 2018 in Washington, DC. A bipartisan group of U.S. senators continues to work toward finding a compromise to end the federal government shutdown that has entered its third day. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 22: Sen. Cory Gardner (R-CO) leaves the office of Sen. Susan Collins following a meeting with a bipartisan group of senators January 22, 2018 in Washington, DC. The bipartisan group of senators continues to work toward finding a compromise to end the federal government shutdown that has entered it's third day. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, a Democrat from New York, walks to his office at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Jan. 22, 2018. Lawmakers failed to negotiate an end to the government shutdown Sunday despite a bipartisan effort to broker a deal, raising the political stakes as federal agencies begin closing at the start of their normal workweek. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A sign indicating that the National Archives Building is closed due to the federal government shutdown stands outside the building in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Jan. 22, 2018. Lawmakers failed to negotiate an end to the government shutdown Sunday despite a bipartisan effort to broker a deal, raising the political stakes as federal agencies begin closing at the start of their normal workweek. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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A similar share, 38 percent, blamed Trump for the shutdown. Just under 2 in 10 (18 percent) said Republicans in Congress were to blame. Taken together, however, the poll shows that a slight majority of Americans — 56 percent — blame the president and his party.

 

Partisan identity plays a big role in assigning blame, the survey shows. Eighty-five percent of Republicans and Republican-leaners blame Democrats for the shutdown. And while a third of Democrats and Democratic-leaners — 33 percent — blame Republicans for the shutdown, 62 percent of Democrats blame Trump.

When it comes to independents, 48 percent point the finger at Trump. But a sizable 31 percent blame congressional Democrats for the stalemate, and only 16 percent think Republicans are to blame.

 

Tense talks over the weekend resulted in Senate Democrats deciding Monday to support a three-week funding bill that would re-open the government in exchange for GOP assurances that Congress would take up a larger immigration bill in the coming weeks.

But a majority of Americans don't think Trump, who was largely absent from the formal negotiations, showed strong leadership qualities during the shutdown crisis, which coincided with the anniversary of his inauguration.

 

Two thirds of Americans — 66 percent — support Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, the Obama-era program at the center of the impasse. There are some divisions by party, though. A slight majority of Republicans said they oppose DACA, which protected young immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children from deportation. An overwhelming majority of Democrats said they support it.

 

Still, 81 percent of Americans said it was unacceptable for the president or members of Congress to threaten a government shutdown to achieve their goals.

The NBC News|SurveyMonkey poll was conducted from Jan. 20 to 22, 2018, among a national sample of 3,450 adults. Respondents for this nonprobability survey were selected from the nearly three million people who take surveys on the SurveyMonkey platform each day. Results have an error estimate of plus or minus 2.2 percentage points. For full results and methodology, click here.

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