One of the last mysteries of the Dead Sea Scrolls has been decoded

One of the final mysteries of the Dead Sea Scrolls has been unlocked.

Researchers at the University of Haifa spent over a year piecing together 60 tiny fragments of the scroll. 

Archeologists have deciphered a sort of calendar with festivals marking the changing of the seasons including, the festival of New Wheat, New Wine and New Oil. 

The calendar was based on a 364-day year, with each festival taking place 50 days after the other.

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A volunteer with the Israeli Antique Authority rests during a break at the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
An Israeli Antique Authority camp is seen near the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
A hat and boots belonging to a volunteer with the Israeli Antique Authority are seen inside the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun
A volunteer with the Israeli Antique Authority holds a securing rope as he walks down to enter the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
A volunteer of the Israeli Antique Authority holds a securing rope as he climbs out of the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
A volunteer with the Israeli Antique Authority works inside the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
Volunteers with the Israeli Antique Authority work inside the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
Volunteers with the Israeli Antique Authority work at the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
A volunteer with the Israeli Antique Authority works at the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
A volunteer with the Israeli Antique Authority holds a bone found at the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
Volunteers with the Israeli Antique Authority work at the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
A volunteer with the Israeli Antique Authority holds a tooth found at the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
Volunteers with the Israeli Antique Authority work at the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
A volunteer with the Israeli Antique Authority rests during a break at the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
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Researchers said the calendar worked perfectly with 364 days because "this number can be divided into four and seven."

That means special occasions would always fall on the same day.

The Dead Sea Scrolls consist of 900 scrolls and comprise what is thought to be the oldest known copy of the Bible in existence. 

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