Senate moves to end government shutdown

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. senators voted to move forward on legislation that would reopen the federal government until Feb. 8, ending a three-day standoff between Democrats and President Donald Trump's Republicans over immigration and border security.

Funding legislation cleared a procedural hurdle in the Senate and was expected to pass a full Senate vote promptly, allowing government to re-open.

Democrats had insisted that any short-term spending legislation to keep the government running include protections for young undocumented immigrants known as "Dreamers."

RELATED: Government shutdown extends into Monday

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Government shutdown extends into Monday
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Government shutdown extends into Monday
A jogger runs pas the U.S. Capitol during the third day of a government shutdown in Washington, U.S. January 22, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 22 : (L to R) Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) and Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ) talk to reporters after a meeting with a bipartisan group of moderate Senators in Collins' office on Capitol Hill, January 22, 2018 in Washington, DC. Lawmakers are continuing to seek a deal to end the government shutdown, now in day three. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn (R-TX) speaks to reporters during the third day of a shut down of the federal government on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., January 22, 2018. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) walks from the Senate floor during the third day of a shut down of the federal government on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., January 22, 2018. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 22 : (L to R) Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) and Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ) talk to reporters after a meeting with a bipartisan group of moderate Senators in Collins' office on Capitol Hill, January 22, 2018 in Washington, DC. Lawmakers are continuing to seek a deal to end the government shutdown, now in day three. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
A notice about the government shutdown is seen on the door of the men's bathroom at the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial on the first full week of the government shutdown in Washington, DC on January 22, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
An idle forklift and building supplies are seen infront of the Lincoln Memorial on the first full week of the government shutdown in Washington, DC on January 22, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 22: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) arrives at the U.S. Capitol on January 22, 2018 in Washington, DC. A bipartisan group of U.S. senators continues to work toward finding a compromise to end the federal government shutdown that has entered its third day. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 22: Sen. Cory Gardner (R-CO) leaves the office of Sen. Susan Collins following a meeting with a bipartisan group of senators January 22, 2018 in Washington, DC. The bipartisan group of senators continues to work toward finding a compromise to end the federal government shutdown that has entered it's third day. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, a Democrat from New York, walks to his office at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Jan. 22, 2018. Lawmakers failed to negotiate an end to the government shutdown Sunday despite a bipartisan effort to broker a deal, raising the political stakes as federal agencies begin closing at the start of their normal workweek. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A sign indicating that the National Archives Building is closed due to the federal government shutdown stands outside the building in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Jan. 22, 2018. Lawmakers failed to negotiate an end to the government shutdown Sunday despite a bipartisan effort to broker a deal, raising the political stakes as federal agencies begin closing at the start of their normal workweek. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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Republicans in turn said they would not negotiate on immigration until Democrats gave them the votes needed to reopen the government.

The shutdown, which began on the first anniversary of Trump’s inauguration, threatened to undercut the president's self-crafted image as a dealmaker who would repair the broken culture in Washington.

The failure to reach a deal had forced Trump to cancel a planned weekend trip to his Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida and created uncertainty around his scheduled trip this week to the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

Tens of thousands of federal workers had begun closing down operations on Monday, the first weekday since the shutdown, but essential services such as security and defense operations continued.

Funding for government operations expired at midnight on Friday and lawmakers worked through the weekend to solve the crisis. The outlines of a deal began emerging as a bipartisan group of senators held talks on Sunday and Monday morning.

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Senators who voted against reopening government
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Senators who voted against reopening government

Senator Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn.

REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Senator Cory Booker, D-NJ

Zach Gibson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Senator Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif.

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto, D-Nev.

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, D-NY

Photographer: Zach Gibson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif.

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senator Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii

REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy, D-VT

REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

Senator Ed Markey, D-Mass.

(Photo by Keith Bedford/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

Senator Robert Menendez, D-NY

Photographer: Aaron P. Bernstein/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Senator Jeff Merkley, D-Ore. 

(Photo by Lukas Schulze/Getty Images)

Senator Chris Murphy, D-Conn.

REUTERS/Mike Segar

Senator Bernie Sanders, I-VT

REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Senator Jon Tester, D-Montana

REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Senator Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass.

REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

Senator Ron Wyden, D-Ore.

Photographer: Aaron P. Bernstein/Bloomberg via Getty Images

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Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer said he had come to an arrangement with Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell to keep the government open for the next three weeks and a plan to address the issue of the Dreamers, more than 700,000 immigrants brought to the United States illegally as children.

House of Representatives Republicans have been told by their leaders to plan on voting on a measure to re-open the government immediately.

(Additional reporting David Morgan, Ginger Gibson, Amanda Becker, Blake Brittain, Susan Heavey, Diane Bartz, Megan Davies, Lucia Mutikani, Yasmeen Abdutaleb, Patricia Zengerle; Writing by Doina Chiacu; Editing by Alistair Bell)

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