Displaced by war, some Yemenis sift through garbage for food

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Displaced Yeminis struggle to survive
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Displaced Yeminis struggle to survive
Ayoub Mohammed Ruzaiq, 11, stands in a garbage dump where he collects recyclables and food near the Red Sea port city of Hodeidah, Yemen, January 13, 2018. "We eat and drink the food that is thrown away," said Ayoub. "We collect fish, meat, potatoes, onions and flour to make our own food." REUTERS/Abduljabbar Zeyad 
Members of the Ruzaiq family play cards inside their hut next to a garbage dump where they collect recyclables and food near the Red Sea port city of Hodeidah, Yemen, January 13, 2018. REUTERS/Abduljabbar Zeyad
Ayoub Mohammed Ruzaiq, 11, combs his hair inside his family's hut next to a garbage dump where he collects recyclables and food near the Red Sea port city of Hodeidah, Yemen, January 16, 2018. "We eat and drink the food that is thrown away," said Ayoub. "We collect fish, meat, potatoes, onions and flour to make our own food." REUTERS/Abduljabbar Zeyad 
Bags filled with clothes belonging to Ruzaiq family are seen at their hut next to a garbage dump where they collect recyclables and food near the Red Sea port city of Hodeidah, Yemen, January 09, 2018. REUTERS/Abduljabbar Zeyad 
Ayoub Mohammed Ruzaiq, 11, lies in his family's hut next to a garbage dump where he collects recyclables and food near the Red Sea port city of Hodeidah, Yemen, January 09, 2018. "We eat and drink the food that is thrown away," said Ayoub. "We collect fish, meat, potatoes, onions and flour to make our own food." REUTERS/Abduljabbar Zeyad 
A girl sleeps in a hammock as her sister lies on a makeshift bed in the Ruzaiq family's hut next to a garbage dump where they collect recyclables and food near the Red Sea port city of Hodeidah, Yemen, January 13, 2018. REUTERS/Abduljabbar Zeyad 
Members of the Ruzaiq family eat a meal outside their hut, next to a garbage dump where they collect recyclables and food near the Red Sea port city of Hodeidah, Yemen, January 09, 2018. REUTERS/Abduljabbar Zeyad 
Food is stored in a broken refrigerator belonging to 18-member Ruzaiq family who live next to a garbage dump where they collect recyclables and food near the Red Sea port city of Hodeidah, Yemen, January 16, 2018. REUTERS/Abduljabbar Zeyad 
Ayoub Mohammed Ruzaiq, 11, performs a prayer outside his family's hut next to a garbage dump where he collects recyclables and food near the Red Sea port city of Hodeidah, Yemen, January 14, 2018. "We eat and drink the food that is thrown away," said Ayoub. "We collect fish, meat, potatoes, onions and flour to make our own food." REUTERS/Abduljabbar Zeyad 
Mohammed Ruzaiq (L), 67, and his son Ayoub, 11, sit in a tent next to a garbage dump where they collect recyclables and food near the Red Sea port city of Hodeidah, Yemen, January 09, 2018. "All we want is for them to stop this war and this calamity and God almighty will provide for us," Mohammed Ruzaiq said. REUTERS/Abduljabbar Zeyad 
Members of Ruzaiq family sit for the breakfast outside their hut next to a garbage dump where they collect recyclables and food near the Red Sea port city of Hodeidah, Yemen, January 09, 2018. REUTERS/Abduljabbar Zeyad 
Shamaa Qassim Eyssa, 35, washes her son Abdu Mohammed Ruzaiq, 7, outside their hut next to a garbage dump where they collect food and recyclables near the Red Sea port city of Hodeidah, Yemen, January 16, 2018. REUTERS/Abduljabbar Zeyad 
Ayoub Mohammed Ruzaiq, 11, poses for a photograph at a garbage dump where he collects recyclables and food near the Red Sea port city of Hodeidah, Yemen, January 13, 2018. "We eat and drink the food that is thrown away," said Ayoub. "We collect fish, meat, potatoes, onions and flour to make our own food." REUTERS/Abduljabbar Zeyad 
Abdu Mohammed Ruzaiq, 7, holds a toy he found at a garbage dump where he collects recyclables and food near the Red Sea port city of Hodeidah, Yemen, January 16, 2018. REUTERS/Abduljabbar Zeyad 
Ayoub Mohammed Ruzaiq (R), 11, and his family members pose for a photograph outside their hut next to a garbage dump where they collect recyclables and food near the Red Sea port city of Hodeidah, Yemen, January 09, 2018. "We eat and drink the food that is thrown away," said Ayoub. "We collect fish, meat, potatoes, onions and flour to make our own food." REUTERS/Abduljabbar Zeyad 
People collect recyclables and food at a garbage dump near the Red Sea port city of Hodeidah, Yemen, January 14, 2018. REUTERS/Abduljabbar Zeyad 
Ayoub Mohammed Ruzaiq, 11, holds green peppers he found at a garbage dump near the Red Sea port city of Hodeidah, Yemen, January 09, 2018. "We eat and drink the food that is thrown away," said Ayoub. "We collect fish, meat, potatoes, onions and flour to make our own food." REUTERS/Abduljabbar Zeyad 
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HODEIDAH, Yemen, Jan 18 (Reuters) - After persistent Saudi-led air strikes on their home area in northwest Yemen, the Ruzaiq family packed their belongings and fled to the relative safety of Hodeidah port on the Red Sea.

But with no money or relatives to shelter them, the 18-member family joined a growing number of displaced Yemenis living on or next to the garbage dump of the Houthi-controlled city.

Despite the health risks, the dump has become a source of food for hundreds of impoverished Yemenis and given some young men a chance to try to earn some income.

"We eat and drink the food that is thrown away," said 11-year-old Ayoub Mohammed Ruzaiq. "We collect fish, meat, potatoes, onions and flour to make our own food."

The United Nations estimates that more than two million people have been displaced by the war, which intensified in 2015 when an Arab coalition intervened to try to restore President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi to power after the Houthis forced him into exile.

The war has killed more than 10,000 people, crippled the economy, caused a cholera epidemic that has killed nearly 2,000 people and pushed the country to the verge of famine.

The Saudi-led coalition denies Houthi accusations that it targets civilians or civilian property in its operations. Riyadh sees the Houthis as a proxy militia linked to regional rival Iran. Both Iran and the Houthis deny any military cooperation.

Fatema Hassan Marouai, 53, who was driven from her home in Hodeidah by economic hardships, said that apart from picking up food thrown away by better off Yemenis, some displaced people collect metal cans and plastic bottles to sell to merchants for some cash to cover daily needs.

But she said income from that activity was also declining.

Merchants who once paid up to 50 Yemeni rials ($0.11) for a kg of plastic bottles, now offer 10 rials only, she said.

"We had been in a bad situation and the war made things worse," said Fatema.

Ruzaiq family patriarch Mohammed Ruzaiq, 67, said Yemenis were not asking for any aid from outside, just a goodwill effort to end the war.

"All we want is for them to stop this war and this calamity and God almighty will provide for us," he said. (US$ = 500 rials)

(Reporting by Abduljabbar Zeyad, writing by Sami Aboudi, Editing by William Maclean)

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