McKayla Maroney's awful nightmare of abuse laid bare in court in front of Larry Nassar

LANSING, Mich. — In December 2016, as part of a settlement agreement with USA Gymnastics over sexual abuse at the hands of former team doctor Larry Nassar, Olympic gold medalist McKayla Maroney signed a confidentiality agreement. It barred her from speaking about the case, unless under subpoena, or face a $100,000 fine.

Considering the acts of Nassar and the fact Maroney was repeatedly assaulted and raped by Nassar from the age of 15 through her retirement, including during her medal winning days at the 2012 London Olympics, it was a pathetic demand from USAG. That Maroney suffered from deep depression, suicidal instincts and mountains of medical and counselling bills because of it, made the agreement inexcusably evil.

It was so pathetic that even the USAG came to its senses, lifting the non-disclosure clause after widespread media and public outrage, including a pledge by supermodel Chrissy Teigen to pay the fine.

At last free to tell her story, Maroney, 22, didn’t hesitate.

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McKayla Maroney through the years
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McKayla Maroney through the years
DALLAS, TX - MAY 14: Gymnast, McKayla Maroney, poses for a portrait during the 2012 Team USA Media Summit on May 14, 2012 in Dallas, Texas. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
GOOD MORNING AMERICA - U.S. women's gymnastics 'Fierce Five' appear on 'Good Morning America,' 8/15/12, airing on the ABC Television Network. (photo by Fred Lee/ABC via Getty Images) JOSH ELLIOTT, JORDYN WIEBER, GABBY DOUGLAS, MCKAYLA MARONEY, KYLA ROSS, ALY RAISMAN
ST. LOUIS, MO - JUNE 8: McKayla Maroney competes on the balance beam during the Senior Women's competition on day two of the Visa Championships at Chaifetz Arena on June 8, 2012 in St. Louis, Missouri. (Photo by Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images)
ST. LOUIS, MO - JUNE 8: McKayla Maroney gets ready to compete on the balance beam during the Senior Women's competition on day two of the Visa Championships at Chaifetz Arena on June 8, 2012 in St. Louis, Missouri. (Photo by Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images)
The United States women's gymnastics team of (center podium, left to right) Jordyn Wieber, Gabrielle Douglas, McKayla Maroney, Alexandra Raisman and Kyla Ross listened to the National Anthem during victory ceremonies at North Greenwich Arena during the 2012 Summer Olympic Games in London, England, Tuesday, July 31, 2012. (David Eulitt/Kansas City Star/MCT via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 14: Gymnast McKayla Maroney poses at The Empire State Building on August 14, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by Bennett Raglin/WireImage)
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 14: Jordyn Wieber, Aly Raisman, McKayla Maroney, Kyla Ross and Gabby Douglas of the 2012 U.S. Women's Gymnastics Olympic Gold Medal Team ring the closing bell at the New York Stock Exchange on August 14, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by Jason Kempin/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 14: McKayla Maroney leaves the 'Late Show with David Letterman' at Ed Sullivan Theater on August 14, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by James Devaney/WireImage)
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 14: (L-R) Members of the Olympic gold medal-winning U.S. Women's Gymnastics team Aly Raisman, McKayla Maroney, Jordyn Wieber and Kyla Ross attend The Cinema Society with Circa and Alice & Olivia screening of 'Sparkle' After Party at the Soho Grand Hotel on August 14, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - SEPTEMBER 03: 2012 US Women's Gymnastics Olympic Team members McKayla Maroney, Gabby Douglas and Kyla Ross pose with Tommy Lasorda (2nd from left) after throwing out the ceremonial first pitch at Dodger Stadium on September 3, 2012 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Mark Sullivan/WireImage)
LOS ANGELES, CA - SEPTEMBER 06: (L-R) McKayla Maroney, Jordyn Wieber, Kyla Ross, Gabby Douglas and Alexandra Raisman arrive at the 2012 MTV Video Music Awards at Staples Center on September 6, 2012 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic)
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 14: Olympic gymnast gold and silver medalist McKayla Maroney makes an appearance to sign autographs Wednesday, November 14, 2012 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Katherine Frey/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 22: Olympic gymnast McKayla Maroney attends the 86th Annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade on November 22, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by Ray Tamarra/FilmMagic)
EAST RUTHERFORD, NJ - NOVEMBER 22: Gymnasts Jordyn Wieber and McKayla Maroney attend the New England Patriots vs. New York Jets game at MetLife Stadium on November 22, 2012 in East Rutherford, New Jersey. (Photo by Al Pereira/WireImage)
SANTA MONICA, CA - FEBRUARY 09: Aly Raisman, Nick Cannon and McKayla Maroney attend the Third Annual Hall of Game Awards hosted by Cartoon Network at Barker Hangar on February 9, 2013 in Santa Monica, California. (Photo by JB Lacroix/WireImage)
SANTA MONICA, CA - FEBRUARY 09: McKayla Maroney attends the Third Annual Hall of Game Awards hosted by Cartoon Network at Barker Hangar on February 9, 2013 in Santa Monica, California. (Photo by JB Lacroix/WireImage)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JULY 17: US gymnast McKayla Maroney arrives at the 2013 ESPY Awards at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live on July 17, 2013 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by C Flanigan/FilmMagic)
McKayla Maroney, Long Beach, California, during the Senior Women Competition at The 2013 P&G Gymnastics Championships, USA Gymnastics' National Championships at the XL, Centre, Hartford, Connecticut, USA. 15th August 2013. Photo Tim Clayton (Photo by Tim Clayton/Corbis via Getty Images)
US McKayla Maroney competes on uneven bars at the 44th World Artistic Gymnastics Championships in Antwerp on October 2, 2013. AFP PHOTO / JOHN THYS (Photo credit should read JOHN THYS/AFP/Getty Images)
ANTWERPEN, BELGIUM - OCTOBER 05: McKayla Maroney of USA competes in the Vault Final on Day Six of the Artistic Gymnastics World Championships Belgium 2013 held at the Antwerp Sports Palace on October 5, 2013 in Antwerpen, Belgium. Jorge Luis Alvarez Pupo/LatinContent/Getty Images
HOLLYWOOD, CA - MARCH 27: Gymnast McKayla Maroney attends the GBK & Stop Attack Pre Kids Choice Gift Lounge held at The Redbury Hotel on March 27, 2015 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Tommaso Boddi/Getty Images for GBK Productions)
GOOD MORNING AMERICA - Olympic Gymnasts Dominique Dawes and Mckayla Maroney are guests on 'Good Morning America,' 8/9/16, airing on the ABC Television Network. (Photo by Heidi Gutman/ABC via Getty Images) DOMINIQUE DAWES, MCKAYLA MARONEY
WEST HOLLYWOOD, CA - JULY 28: McKayla Maroney attends TigerBeat's Official Teen Choice Awards Pre-Party Sponsored by NYX Professional Makeup and Rock Your Hair at HYDE Sunset: Kitchen + Cocktails on July 28, 2016 in West Hollywood, California. (Photo by Jonathan Leibson/WireImage)
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On Thursday in a Michigan courtroom, a statement was read from her detailing her abuse at the hands of Nassar and calling out USAG, the United States Olympic Committee and Michigan State University, where Nassar worked, for not stopping him when they could.

“I had a dream to go to the Olympics,” Maroney wrote in the statement, read in court by prosecutor Angela Povilaitis. “The things I had to endure to get there were unnecessary and disgusting.”

Maroney began gymnastics at 18 months because her mother, Erin, said she needed to find a way to tire out a child with limitless energy. By six, she was competing and believed she would make the Olympics one day. At 14, she was on the national team. At 17, she won a team gold and an individual silver in London, a disappointment on the vault which caused her to issue a “not impressed” smile that went so viral she even reenacted it in the Oval Office with President Obama.

That was the public glory. The private hell was churning inside.

“Sure, from the outside looking in, it’s a remarkable story,” Maroney said of achieving her Olympic dreams. “I did it. I got there.

“But not without a price.”

24 PHOTOS
Larry Nassar, former USA Gymnastics doctor, in court
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Larry Nassar, former USA Gymnastics doctor, in court
Larry Nassar, a former team USA Gymnastics doctor who pleaded guilty in November 2017 to sexual assault charges, stands during his sentencing hearing in Lansing, Michigan, U.S., January 24, 2018. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
Larry Nassar, a former team USA Gymnastics doctor who pleaded guilty in November 2017 to sexual assault charges, stands with his legal team during his sentencing hearing in Lansing, Michigan, U.S., January 24, 2018. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
Larry Nassar, a former team USA Gymnastics doctor who pleaded guilty in November 2017 to sexual assault charges, stands with his legal team during his sentencing hearing in Lansing, Michigan, U.S., January 24, 2018. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
Prosecutor Angela Povilaitis speaks at the sentencing hearing for Larry Nassar,a former team USA Gymnastics doctor who pleaded guilty in November 2017 to sexual assault charges, in Lansing, Michigan, U.S., January 24, 2018. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
Larry Nassar, a former team USA Gymnastics doctor who pleaded guilty in November 2017 to sexual assault charges, listens as Prosecutor Angela Povilaitis speaks at his sentencing hearing in Lansing, Michigan, U.S., January 24, 2018. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
LANSING, MI - JANUARY 16: Larry Nassar listens to victim impact statements prior to being sentenced after being accused of molesting about 100 girls while he was a physician for USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University, where he had his sports-medicine practice on January 16, 2018 in Lansing, Michigan. Nassar has pleaded guilty in Ingham County, Michigan, to sexually assaulting seven girls, but the judge is allowing all his accusers to speak. Nassar is currently serving a 60-year sentence in federal prison for possession of child pornography. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Victim and former gymnast Aly Raisman speaks at the sentencing hearing for Larry Nassar, (L) a former team USA Gymnastics doctor who pleaded guilty in November 2017 to sexual assault charges, in Lansing, Michigan, U.S., January 19, 2018. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
Larry Nassar, a former team USA Gymnastics doctor who pleaded guilty in November 2017 to sexual assault charges, sits in the courtroom during his sentencing hearing in Lansing, Michigan, U.S., January 19, 2018. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
Larry Nassar, a former team USA Gymnastics doctor who pleaded guilty in November 2017 to sexual assault charges, arrives in the courtroom during his sentencing hearing in Lansing, Michigan, U.S., January 19, 2018. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
LANSING, MI - JANUARY 17: Larry Nassar appears in court to listen to victim impact statements during his sentencing hearing after being accused of molesting more than 100 girls while he was a physician for USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University where he had his sports-medicine practice on January 17, 2018 in Lansing, Michigan. Nassar has pleaded guilty in Ingham County, Michigan, to sexually assaulting seven girls, but the judge is allowing all his accusers to speak. Nassar is currently serving a 60-year sentence in federal prison for possession of child pornography. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
LANSING, MI - JANUARY 17: Larry Nassar listens to victim impact statements during his sentencing hearing after being accused of molesting more than 100 girls while he was a physician for USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University where he had his sports-medicine practice on January 17, 2018 in Lansing, Michigan. Nassar has pleaded guilty in Ingham County, Michigan, to sexually assaulting seven girls, but the judge is allowing all his accusers to speak. Nassar is currently serving a 60-year sentence in federal prison for possession of child pornography. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
LANSING, MI - JANUARY 16: Larry Nassar listens to victim impact statements prior to being sentenced after being accused of molesting about 100 girls while he was a physician for USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University, where he had his sports-medicine practice on January 16, 2018 in Lansing, Michigan. Nassar has pleaded guilty in Ingham County, Michigan, to sexually assaulting seven girls, but the judge is allowing all his accusers to speak. Nassar is currently serving a 60-year sentence in federal prison for possession of child pornography. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
LANSING, MI - JANUARY 16: Larry Nassar listens to victim impact statements prior to being sentenced after being accused of molesting about 100 girls while he was a physician for USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University, where he had his sports-medicine practice on January 16, 2018 in Lansing, Michigan. Nassar has pleaded guilty in Ingham County, Michigan, to sexually assaulting seven girls, but the judge is allowing all his accusers to speak. Nassar is currently serving a 60-year sentence in federal prison for possession of child pornography. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
LANSING, MI - JANUARY 16: Larry Nassar appears in court to listen to victim impact statements prior to being sentenced after being accused of molesting about 100 girls while he was a physician for USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University, where he had his sports-medicine practice on January 16, 2018 in Lansing, Michigan. Nassar has pleaded guilty in Ingham County, Michigan, to sexually assaulting seven girls, but the judge is allowing all his accusers to speak. Nassar is currently serving a 60-year sentence in federal prison for possession of child pornography. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
LANSING, MI - JANUARY 16: Larry Nassar appears in court to listen to victim impact statements prior to being sentenced after being accused of molesting about 100 girls while he was a physician for USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University, where he had his sports-medicine practice on January 16, 2018 in Lansing, Michigan. Nassar has pleaded guilty in Ingham County, Michigan, to sexually assaulting seven girls, but the judge is allowing all his accusers to speak. Nassar is currently serving a 60-year sentence in federal prison for possession of child pornography. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Former Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar is seen in the 55th District Court where Judge Donald Allen Jr. bound him over on June 23, 2017 in Mason, Michigan to stand trial on 12 counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct. / AFP PHOTO / JEFF KOWALSKY (Photo credit should read JEFF KOWALSKY/AFP/Getty Images)
Asst. Michigan Attorney General Angela M. Povilaitis (L) speaks during the hearing of former Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar listen with (2nd R) defense attorneys Shannon Smith (2nd L) and Matt Newberg (R) in 55th District Court where Judge Donald Allen Jr. bound him over on June 23, 2017 in Mason, Michigan to stand trial on 12 counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct. / AFP PHOTO / JEFF KOWALSKY (Photo credit should read JEFF KOWALSKY/AFP/Getty Images)
Former Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar watches a video his interview with the police in the 55th District Court where Judge Donald Allen Jr. bound him over on June 23, 2017 in Mason, Michigan to stand trial on 12 counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct. / AFP PHOTO / JEFF KOWALSKY (Photo credit should read JEFF KOWALSKY/AFP/Getty Images)
Former Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar (C) with defense attorneys Shannon Smith (L) and Matt Newberg (R) in the 55th District Court where Judge Donald Allen Jr. bound him over on June 23, 2017 in Mason, Michigan to stand trial on 12 counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct. / AFP PHOTO / JEFF KOWALSKY (Photo credit should read JEFF KOWALSKY/AFP/Getty Images)
Former Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar is seen in the 55th District Court where Judge Donald Allen Jr. bound him over on June 23, 2017 in Mason, Michigan to stand trial on 12 counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct. / AFP PHOTO / JEFF KOWALSKY (Photo credit should read JEFF KOWALSKY/AFP/Getty Images)
Former Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar is seen in the 55th District Court where Judge Donald Allen Jr. bound him over on June 23, 2017 in Mason, Michigan to stand trial on 12 counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct. / AFP PHOTO / JEFF KOWALSKY (Photo credit should read JEFF KOWALSKY/AFP/Getty Images)
Former Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar is seen in the 55th District Court where Judge Donald Allen Jr. bound him over on June 23, 2017 in Mason, Michigan to stand trial on 12 counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct. / AFP PHOTO / JEFF KOWALSKY (Photo credit should read JEFF KOWALSKY/AFP/Getty Images)
Former Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar is seen in the 55th District Court where Judge Donald Allen Jr. bound him over on June 23, 2017 in Mason, Michigan to stand trial on 12 counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct. / AFP PHOTO / JEFF KOWALSKY (Photo credit should read JEFF KOWALSKY/AFP/Getty Images)
Former Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar is seen in the 55th District Court where Judge Donald Allen Jr. bound him over on June 23, 2017 in Mason, Michigan to stand trial on 12 counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct. / AFP PHOTO / JEFF KOWALSKY (Photo credit should read JEFF KOWALSKY/AFP/Getty Images)
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Nassar, 54, is already serving 60 years in federal prison on a child pornography conviction. He is facing up to 125 addition years here in Ingham County for molesting over 100 girls, many of them local gymnasts but others national team members that he “treated” through his work with USAG. He faces additional charges in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

As part of the sentencing, Judge Rosemarie E. Aquilina is allowing any and all of his victims to address Nassar and the court. The remarkable hearing began Tuesday and is scheduled four days. With over 105 seeking to speak, a number that grows each day, Aquilina said it may stretch into the middle of next week.

Maroney is sadly, terribly, but one of many. Desperate for help with injuries that might keep her from training and derail her gymnastics goals, she turned to Nassar, a renowned physician. He told her that his unorthodox treatment methods had worked on generations of gymnastics greats. Due to the USAG’s rule of prohibiting parents from accompaning their children during national camps and competition, she, just a teenager, was left to believe him.

“I was told to trust him,” Maroney said.

He, instead, raped her. Repeatedly.

“As it turns out, much to my demise, Dr. Nassar was not a doctor,” Maroney said. “He was and forever will be, a child molester, a monster of a human being. End of story. He abused my trust. He abused my body. And he left scars on my psyche that may never go away.”

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Gymnasts who have accused Larry Nassar of assault
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Gymnasts who have accused Larry Nassar of assault
Rachael Denhollander (C) the first woman to publicly say she was sexually abused by Larry Nassar, the former physician for the U.S. womens gymnastics team is hugged during a hearing in Ingham County Circuit Court on November 22, 2017 in Lansing, Michigan. Former USA Gymnastics team doctor Lawrence (Larry) Nassar, accused of molesting dozens of female athletes over several decades, on Wednesday pleaded guilty to multiple counts of criminal sexual conduct. Nassar -- who was involved with USA Gymnastics for nearly three decades and worked with the country's gymnasts at four separate Olympic Games -- could face at least 25 years in prison on the charges brought in Michigan. / AFP PHOTO / JEFF KOWALSKY (Photo credit should read JEFF KOWALSKY/AFP/Getty Images)
Larissa Boyce, a former gymnast sexually abused by Larry Nassar, the former physician for the U.S. womens gymnastics team attends a hearing of Nassar's trial in Ingham County Circuit Court on November 22, 2017 in Lansing, Michigan. Former USA Gymnastics team doctor Lawrence (Larry) Nassar, accused of molesting dozens of female athletes over several decades, on Wednesday pleaded guilty to multiple counts of criminal sexual conduct. Nassar -- who was involved with USA Gymnastics for nearly three decades and worked with the country's gymnasts at four separate Olympic Games -- could face at least 25 years in prison on the charges brought in Michigan. / AFP PHOTO / JEFF KOWALSKY (Photo credit should read JEFF KOWALSKY/AFP/Getty Images)
Rachael Denhollander (4th L with white blouse) the first woman to publicly say she was sexually abused by Larry Nassar, the former physician for the U.S. womens gymnastics team attends a hearing in Ingham County Circuit Court on November 22, 2017 in Lansing, Michigan. Former USA Gymnastics team doctor Lawrence (Larry) Nassar, accused of molesting dozens of female athletes over several decades, on Wednesday pleaded guilty to multiple counts of criminal sexual conduct. Nassar -- who was involved with USA Gymnastics for nearly three decades and worked with the country's gymnasts at four separate Olympic Games -- could face at least 25 years in prison on the charges brought in Michigan. / AFP PHOTO / JEFF KOWALSKY (Photo credit should read JEFF KOWALSKY/AFP/Getty Images)
Madeleine Jones, 18 of Farmington Hills, Michigan, who was victimized by former Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar attends a hearing in Ingham County Circuit Court on November 22, 2017 in Lansing, Michigan. Former USA Gymnastics team doctor Lawrence (Larry) Nassar, accused of molesting dozens of female athletes over several decades, on Wednesday pleaded guilty to multiple counts of criminal sexual conduct. Nassar -- who was involved with USA Gymnastics for nearly three decades and worked with the country's gymnasts at four separate Olympic Games -- could face at least 25 years in prison on the charges brought in Michigan. / AFP PHOTO / JEFF KOWALSKY (Photo credit should read JEFF KOWALSKY/AFP/Getty Images)
Larissa Boyce (R) gets a hug from Alexis Alvarado, both victims of Larry Nassar, during a hearing in Ingham County Circuit Court on November 22, 2017 in Lansing, Michigan. Former USA Gymnastics team doctor Lawrence (Larry) Nassar, accused of molesting dozens of female athletes over several decades, on Wednesday pleaded guilty to multiple counts of criminal sexual conduct. Nassar -- who was involved with USA Gymnastics for nearly three decades and worked with the country's gymnasts at four separate Olympic Games -- could face at least 25 years in prison on the charges brought in Michigan. / AFP PHOTO / JEFF KOWALSKY (Photo credit should read JEFF KOWALSKY/AFP/Getty Images)
kalie Lorincz (C) who was victimized by former Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar during a hearing in Ingham County Circuit Court on November 22, 2017 in Lansing, Michigan. Former USA Gymnastics team doctor Lawrence (Larry) Nassar, accused of molesting dozens of female athletes over several decades, on Wednesday pleaded guilty to multiple counts of criminal sexual conduct. Nassar -- who was involved with USA Gymnastics for nearly three decades and worked with the country's gymnasts at four separate Olympic Games -- could face at least 25 years in prison on the charges brought in Michigan. / AFP PHOTO / JEFF KOWALSKY (Photo credit should read JEFF KOWALSKY/AFP/Getty Images)
ANTWERPEN, BELGIUM - OCTOBER 02: McKayla Maroney of USA gets ready to compete in the Womens Vault Qualification on Day Three of the Artistic Gymnastics World Championships Belgium 2013 held at the Antwerp Sports Palace on October 2, 2013 in Antwerpen, Belgium. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - AUGUST 16: Aly Raisman of the United States performs during the women's floor exercise final at Rio 2016 on Tuesday, August 16, 2016. Raisin finished second to fellow American Simone Biles. (Photo by AAron Ontiveroz/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 29: Olympic medalist Simone Biles stands on stage during an East Room event at the White House September 29, 2016 in Washington, DC. President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama welcome the 2016 U.S. Olympic and Paralympic teams to the White House to honor their participation and success in the Rio Olympic Games this year. (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
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Nassar sat motionless as the statement was read, with a picture of Maroney up on a projection screen in the small, Courtroom 5 here in downtown Lansing. He looked as weak and bewildered as ever.

“It seemed whenever and wherever this man could find the chance, I was ‘treated,’ ” Maroney said, of the abuse. “It happened in London before my team and I won a gold medal and it happened before I won my silver medal.”

She said the worst was when she was 15 and scheduled to compete in Japan.

“I had flown all day and night to get to Tokyo,” Maroney said. “He gave me a sleeping pill for the flight and next thing I remember I was alone in his hotel room getting a treatment. I thought I was going to die that night.”

Maroney took particular aim at MSU, USAG and the USOC for failing to stop him, ignoring complaints, conducting weak investigations and not communicating with each other after issues arose.

She implored outside law enforcement to investigate all three institutions. Similar calls have been made by others, but even in Michigan, the state attorney general has not yet begun an investigation into Michigan State the way the Pennsylvania attorney general’s office did to Penn State in the Jerry Sandusky scandal.

“A simple fact is this, if Michigan State University, USA Gymnastics or the U.S. Olympic committee had paid attention to any of the red flags on his behavior I would never have met him, I would never have been treated by him, I would never have been abused by him,” Maroney said.

That reality hung in the air. Throughout the packed courtroom, fellow victims nodded their heads. Many, just like Maroney, are trying to rebuild their lives. Many, like Maroney’s parents, are equally racked with grief, regret and anger.

As these stories grind on, one heroic truth after the next, the worst part is the stories are so similar.

Whether you were a famous Olympian from California or a just beginning gymnast in mid-Michigan, the voices change, the words are too often the same.

McKayla Maroney, finally free to roar from the USAG’s deplorable settlement, was physically far away from here.

Her words rang out, though, rang out among the chorus of so many others gathered here to confront and stop the nightmare of all their lives.

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