Report: Risk of nuclear weapons and extreme weather are top threats for 2018

What issues are 1,000 international leaders from the worlds of business, government, academia, and civil society most concerned about in 2018?

Well, according to the World Economic Forum’s Global Risks Report, nuclear war, cyber-attacks, and environmental disasters lead the record of man-made threats to international stability.

Mother Nature was the most significant risk likely facing the world for a second year in a row.

2017 brought three major Atlantic hurricanes, Harvey, Irma and Maria, causing the most expensive hurricane season. Estimated damages in the United States alone reached as high as $200 billion.

6 PHOTOS
Deadliest hurricanes in US history
See Gallery
Deadliest hurricanes in US history

Galveston Hurricane, 1900

The Category 4 storm, which made landfall in Galveston, Texas, ranks as the deadliest weather disaster in U.S. history. It killed at least 8,000 people, according to the National Weather Service. The storm also flattened thousands of buildings in the coastal city of Galveston, leaving many people homeless. The city was flooded by a storm surge more than 15 feet (4.6 meters) tall.

In this photo: Men use ropes to pull away the debris of houses in order to look for bodies after the Galveston Hurricane of 1900.

Photo by Library of Congress/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images

Okeechobee Hurricane, 1928

The Category 4 storm made landfall in Palm Beach County, Florida. An estimated 2,500 people died, but the figure could be as high as 3,000, according to the National Weather Service. The south shore of Lake Okeechobee was hit by severe flooding as a surge of water topped dikes in the area.

Photo by Planet News Archive/SSPL/Getty Images

Hurricane Katrina, 2005

The hurricane made a direct hit on New Orleans as a Category 3 storm, causing levees and flood walls to fail in dozens of places. Most of New Orleans was flooded, and some people who were stranded in their homes climbed to the roofs to await rescue. About 1,200 people died, according to the National Weather Service. Most victims were in Louisiana, but neighbouring Mississippi also was hard hit. Katrina caused an estimated $108 billion in damage, making it the costliest hurricane ever to strike the United States.

In this photo: Christian Schloegel stands amidst the rubble of his grandmothers home destroyed by Hurricane Katrina in Gulfport, Mississippi, on August 30, 2005.

Photo by Oscar Sosa/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Great New England Hurricane, 1938

The Category 3 storm made landfall in Long Island and Connecticut. It caused about 600 deaths, including off-shore fatalities, according to the National Weather Service. Parts of Massachusetts experienced wind gusts up to 186 miles per hour (299 km/h).

In this photo: Men search for bodies in the wreckage caused by the Great New England Hurricane.

Photo by Seelig/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images

Hurricane Audrey, 1957

The Category 4 hurricane struck near the Texas-Louisiana border, unleashing storm surges that reached up to 25 miles (40 km) inland in the low-lying areas, according to the National Weather Service. It killed more than 400 people.

In this photo: Wreckage shows the aftermath of Hurricane Audrey, Louisiana.

Photo by Shel Hershorn/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Florida Keys Labor Day Hurricane, 1935

The storm ripped through the Florida Keys as a Category 5 storm. It then moved north just off the western coast of Florida before turning inland and making landfall as a Category 2. More than 400 people died.

In this photo: Rescue workers search for more victims of a 100-mile-an-hour hurricane.

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Although viewed as not likely, nuclear war climbed up the list as tensions rise between North Korean leader, Kim Jong Un, and U.S. President, Donald Trump.

The report also points out that cyber breaches recorded by businesses have almost doubled in five years, from 68 per business in 2012 to 130 per business in 2017.

The report comes in advance of the World Economic Forum where founder, Klaus Schwab, says it’s absolutely essential to have President Trump present to discuss the future of global cooperation related to trade, environment, the fight against terrorism tax systems, and competitiveness.

5 PHOTOS
U.S. nuclear weapon testing, stockpile
See Gallery
U.S. nuclear weapon testing, stockpile
Trinity was the code name of the first detonation of a nuclear device, conducted by the United States Army on July 16, 1945 as a result of the Manhattan Project, in the Jornada del Muerto desert, New Mexico, at the new White Sands Proving Ground. Trinity used an implosion-design plutonium device, informally nicknamed 'The Gadget'.. (Photo by Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
A photograph on display at The Bradbury Science Museum shows a hydrogen bomb test on June 24, 1957. The museum is Los Alamos National Laboratory's window to the public. The Museum displays the Laboratory's current research and presents the history of the Laboratory's role in the Manhattan Project during World War II. (photo by Joe Raedle)
A photograph on display at The Bradbury Science Museum shows the first thermonuclear test on October 31, 1952. The museum is Los Alamos National Laboratory's window to the public. The Museum displays the Laboratory's current research and presents the history of the Laboratory's role in the Manhattan Project during World War II. (photograph on display in the Bradbury Science museum, photo copied by Joe Raedle)
Trinity was the code name of the first detonation of a nuclear weapon, conducted by the United States Army as part of the Manhattan Project. 16th July 1945. Device type: Plutonium implosion fission. Yield: 20 kilotons of TNT. The White Sands Proving Ground, where the test was conducted, was in the Jornada del Muerto desert about 35 miles (56 km) southeast of Socorro, New Mexico, on the Alamogordo Bombing and Gunnery Range. New Mexico, USA. (PHoto by Galerie Bilderwelt/Getty Images)
Aerial view of the massive K-25 gaseous diffusion plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, early August, 1945. The plant and, indeed, the entire city of Oak Ridge, was established in 1942 to house the employees (and their families) of the uranium-enrichment facility of the Manhattan Project, the United State's project to develop the atomic bomb. (Photo by PhotoQuest/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Read Full Story