Here's what the FBI had on Martin Luther King, Jr.

Wiretapped, eavesdropped on, and, eventually, killed; from the mid 1950’s until his assassination in 1968, the FBI obsessed over trying to paint Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as a communist.

He spent almost one third of his 39 years under J. Edgard Hoover and the FBI’s watch.

Scrutiny first began with the FBI’s Mobile, Alabama branch in December 1955, after the young minister helped to organize the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

After King's “I Have A Dream” speech, an FBI memo described him as “the most dangerous and effective Negro leader in the country.”

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Martin Luther King, Jr.
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Martin Luther King, Jr.
C8MG9A Martin Luther King, Jr.. Image shot 1963. Exact date unknown.
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Martin Luther King and Malcolm X
MONTGOMERY, AL - MAY 1956: Civil rights leader Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. relaxes at home in May 1956 in Montgomery, Alabama. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)
MONTGOMERY, AL - MAY 13: Civil rights leader Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. speaks with people after delivering a sermon on May 13, 1956 in Montgomery, Alabama. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)
MONTGOMERY, AL - MAY 1956: Civil rights leader Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. relaxes at home with his family in May 1956 in Montgomery, Alabama. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)
American civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929 - 1968) sits on a couch and speaks on the telephone after encountering a white mob protesting against the Freedom Riders in Montgomery, Alabama, May 26, 1961. (Photo by Express Newspapers/Getty Images)
Martin Luther King Jr, at a press conference after meeting with President Johnson at the White House to discuss civil rights, Washington DC, December 3, 1961. (Photo by Warren K. Leffler/Underwood Archives/Getty Images)
Civil Rights leaders Fred Shuttlesworth (left), Martin Luther King Jr (center), and Ralph Abernathy (right) attend a funeral for victims of the 16th Street Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama, 1963. The September 15, 1963 bombing killed four young African-American girls. (Photo by Declan Haun/Chicago History Museum/Getty Images)
President Lyndon B Johnson (1908 - 1973) discusses the Voting Rights Act with civil rights campaigner Martin Luther King Jr. (1929 - 1968). The act, part of President Johnson's 'Great Society' program trebled the number of black voters in the south, who had previously been hindered by racially inspired laws, 1965. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
MONTGOMERY- MARCH 25: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. seen close from the rear, speaking in front of 25,000 civil rights marchers, at the conclusion of the Selma to Montgomery march in front of Alabama state capital building on March 25, 1965. In Montgomery, Alabama. (Photo by Stephen Somerstein/Getty Images)
MONTGOMERY, AL - MARCH 25: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. speaking before crowd of 25,000 Selma To Montgomery, Alabama civil rights marchers, in front of Montgomery, Alabama state capital building. On March 25, 1965 in Montgomery, Alabama. (Photo by Stephen F. Somerstein/Getty Images)
African-American man holding Martin Luther King Jr flag - Washington, DC, USA
The Martin Luther King Jr., memorial on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.
The Rev Al Sharpton speaking at a Dr, Martin Luther King jr Day rally.
Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. meeting with US President Lyndon B. Johnson in the Oval Office of the White House December 3, 1963 in Washington, DC.
Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. meeting with US President Lyndon B. Johnson in the Cabinet Room of the White House March 18, 1966 in Washington, DC.
Funeral of reverend Martin Luther King Jr.
Girl Scouts in Martin Luther King Jr Day Celebration
Martin Luther King Jr Memorial Washington DC dc12 national park monument near National Mall
Detroit, Michigan - June 22, 2013 - Thousands of civil rights, labor, and community activists commemorate the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "Walk to Freedom" with a march that followed the same route down Woodward Avenue. At the 1963 civil rights march, Dr. King previewed his "I Have a Dream" speech which he delivered two months later at the March on Washington. © Jim West/Alamy Live News
Controversial paraphrased quote on the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial.
Martin Luther King, Jr. with wife Coretta Scott King
MLK with Labor Unions
Martin Luther King, Jr. during the March on Washington
Martin Luther King Jr. at the 'Pacem in Terris' Peace Conference
Martin Luther King, Jr. arriving at London Airport
Tourists visiting the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C., USA
Martin Luther King, Jr., T-Shirt commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington, D.C., USA
Martin Luther King Jr Day Rally
India Martin Luther King postage stamp, cancelled
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (right), President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference with Mathew Ahmann (center), Executive Director of the National Catholic Conference for Interrracial Justice during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom August 28, 1963 in Washington, DC.
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According to Historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning author, David Garrow, most of the allegations in the recently released analysis are neither new nor true. 

Although the agency unearthed embarrassing information about King’s personal life, they failed to find evidence of communist ties.  

Instead, years of wiretaps and spending money showed a man who was devoted to serving others, unafraid of self-examination, and unconcerned with fame or notoriety.

According to Newsweek, in the end, the FBI’s memos and recordings ironically succeed mostly in embarrassing itself, not the Civil Rights Icon.

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Donald Trump meets with Martin Luther King III
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Donald Trump meets with Martin Luther King III

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump shakes hands with Martin Luther King III, an American human rights advocate, at Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York City, U.S., January 16, 2017.

(REUTERS/Alex Wroblewski)

Martin Luther King III, an American human rights advocate, speaks to the press after meeting with U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, at Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York City, U.S., January 16, 2017.

(REUTERS/Alex Wroblewski)

Martin Luther King III , an American human rights advocate, speaks to the press after meeting with U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, at Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York City, U.S., January 16, 2017.

(REUTERS/Alex Wroblewski)

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York City, U.S., January 16, 2017.

(REUTERS/Alex Wroblewski)

NEW YORK, NY - JANUARY 16: Martin Luther King III hugs Omarosa Manigault as he arrives at Trump Tower, January 16, 2017 in New York City. Trump will be inaugurated as the next U.S. President this coming Friday. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump with Martin Luther King III, an American human rights advocate, at Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York City, U.S., January 16, 2017.

(REUTERS/Alex Wroblewski)

Martin Luther King III (3rd from right) arrives at Trump Tower, January 16, 2017 in New York City. Trump will be inaugurated as the next U.S. President this coming Friday.

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Martin Luther King III gets on an elevator as he arrives at Trump Tower in New York City on January 16, 2017. The eldest son of American civil rights icon Martin Luther King Jr. met with US President-elect Donald Trump on the national holiday observed in remembrance of his late father.

(DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)

Martin Luther King III (C), an American human rights advocate, meets with associates of the Trump administration in Manhattan, New York City, U.S., January 16, 2017.

(REUTERS/Alex Wroblewski)

Martin Luther King III speaks to reporters after his meeting with President-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower, January 16, 2017 in New York City. Trump will be inaugurated as the next U.S. President this coming Friday.

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

President-elect Donald Trump and Martin Luther King III stand after shaking hands after their meeting at Trump Tower, January 16, 2017 in New York City. Trump will be inaugurated as the next U.S. President this coming Friday.

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

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