New Yorkers honoring Martin Luther King Jr. with Trump protest

New Yorkers will honor Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy with a rally in Times Square where protesters will speak out against President Trump’s anti-immigration policies and rigid criminal justice agenda.

“The nation is on the brink of going backwards if we don't push forward,” said civil rights leader Rev. Al Sharpton in a phone interview with the Daily News. “That’s why it is important really to proclaim we will not go back.”

The National Action Network will kick off the holiday with a breakfast gathering in Washington D.C. featuring Baxter Leach, one of the original striking sanitation workers from Memphis, Tenn., where Dr. King was killed on April 4, 1968.

Dr. King was there to back the 1,300 sanitation workers who were engaged in a 64-day strike, which was prompted by a malfunctioning garbage compactor that fatally crushed two black men, Echol Cole and Robert Walker.

See AlsoPoll: Most Americans support DACA program

On Monday, prominent elected officials and civil rights leaders will celebrate King’s legacy at the National Action Network’s Harlem headquarters.

Speakers will include Gov. Cuomo and Mayor de Blasio, as well as a host of other elected officials.

“We are holding those in power accountable,” Sharpton said, “which is why it’s important we have the officials address the racism of Trump and what they are doing in their officers to address racial and class inequality.”

There will also be a rally in Times Square at 3 p.m. to protest Trump’s comments on immigrants, activists said.

Trump slammed protections for immigrants from “s--thole” countries in the Caribbean and Africa during an Oval Office meeting Thursday afternoon, according to multiple people in attendance.

32 PHOTOS
Martin Luther King, Jr.
See Gallery
Martin Luther King, Jr.
C8MG9A Martin Luther King, Jr.. Image shot 1963. Exact date unknown.
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Martin Luther King and Malcolm X
MONTGOMERY, AL - MAY 1956: Civil rights leader Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. relaxes at home in May 1956 in Montgomery, Alabama. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)
MONTGOMERY, AL - MAY 13: Civil rights leader Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. speaks with people after delivering a sermon on May 13, 1956 in Montgomery, Alabama. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)
MONTGOMERY, AL - MAY 1956: Civil rights leader Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. relaxes at home with his family in May 1956 in Montgomery, Alabama. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)
American civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929 - 1968) sits on a couch and speaks on the telephone after encountering a white mob protesting against the Freedom Riders in Montgomery, Alabama, May 26, 1961. (Photo by Express Newspapers/Getty Images)
Martin Luther King Jr, at a press conference after meeting with President Johnson at the White House to discuss civil rights, Washington DC, December 3, 1961. (Photo by Warren K. Leffler/Underwood Archives/Getty Images)
Civil Rights leaders Fred Shuttlesworth (left), Martin Luther King Jr (center), and Ralph Abernathy (right) attend a funeral for victims of the 16th Street Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama, 1963. The September 15, 1963 bombing killed four young African-American girls. (Photo by Declan Haun/Chicago History Museum/Getty Images)
President Lyndon B Johnson (1908 - 1973) discusses the Voting Rights Act with civil rights campaigner Martin Luther King Jr. (1929 - 1968). The act, part of President Johnson's 'Great Society' program trebled the number of black voters in the south, who had previously been hindered by racially inspired laws, 1965. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
MONTGOMERY- MARCH 25: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. seen close from the rear, speaking in front of 25,000 civil rights marchers, at the conclusion of the Selma to Montgomery march in front of Alabama state capital building on March 25, 1965. In Montgomery, Alabama. (Photo by Stephen Somerstein/Getty Images)
MONTGOMERY, AL - MARCH 25: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. speaking before crowd of 25,000 Selma To Montgomery, Alabama civil rights marchers, in front of Montgomery, Alabama state capital building. On March 25, 1965 in Montgomery, Alabama. (Photo by Stephen F. Somerstein/Getty Images)
African-American man holding Martin Luther King Jr flag - Washington, DC, USA
The Martin Luther King Jr., memorial on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.
The Rev Al Sharpton speaking at a Dr, Martin Luther King jr Day rally.
Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. meeting with US President Lyndon B. Johnson in the Oval Office of the White House December 3, 1963 in Washington, DC.
Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. meeting with US President Lyndon B. Johnson in the Cabinet Room of the White House March 18, 1966 in Washington, DC.
Funeral of reverend Martin Luther King Jr.
Girl Scouts in Martin Luther King Jr Day Celebration
Martin Luther King Jr Memorial Washington DC dc12 national park monument near National Mall
Detroit, Michigan - June 22, 2013 - Thousands of civil rights, labor, and community activists commemorate the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "Walk to Freedom" with a march that followed the same route down Woodward Avenue. At the 1963 civil rights march, Dr. King previewed his "I Have a Dream" speech which he delivered two months later at the March on Washington. © Jim West/Alamy Live News
Controversial paraphrased quote on the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial.
Martin Luther King, Jr. with wife Coretta Scott King
MLK with Labor Unions
Martin Luther King, Jr. during the March on Washington
Martin Luther King Jr. at the 'Pacem in Terris' Peace Conference
Martin Luther King, Jr. arriving at London Airport
Tourists visiting the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C., USA
Martin Luther King, Jr., T-Shirt commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington, D.C., USA
Martin Luther King Jr Day Rally
India Martin Luther King postage stamp, cancelled
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (right), President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference with Mathew Ahmann (center), Executive Director of the National Catholic Conference for Interrracial Justice during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom August 28, 1963 in Washington, DC.
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

“We’ve heard so many things from him via Twitter and otherwise that have been extremely troubling to our humanity,” Bernice King, the slain civil rights leader’s daughter, said in a Facebook live video posted Friday.

She hopes Trump on Monday will try to “suspend any effort at tweeting something negative or insulting.”

Instead, the President should “use his Twitter account on the King holiday to really respect the spirit, the heart and legacy of Dr. King by tweeting positive and uplifting messages.”

Read Full Story