CNN panel erupts after black televangelist Pastor Mark Burns gives biblical defense for Trump

In a recent segment on CNN, Pastor Mark Burns, a member of the president’s evangelical board, attempted to offer a biblical defense for Trump’s comments regarding brown and black nations being “sh**hole countries.”

In mere moments he was shot down. Hard.

“The Bible clearly says, in First Timothy, chapter 5, verse eight,” Pastor Mark Burns began, before Urban Radio’s White House correspondent April Ryan, cut him off.

“I’ve grown up in church so let’s be clear!” Ryan said, which got a “praise God” from Pastor Mark Burns.

“A man who does not take care of his own home, his own home, their own people, is worse than an infidel,” the televangelist stated, paraphrasing a Bible verse. “We have somehow forgotten that in America.”

Once scripture was brought up, Ryan and Burns were competing to get their points across. Ryan brought up another famous verse from the Bible, “love thy neighbor as thyself.”

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U.S. President Donald Trump holds a bipartisan meeting with legislators on immigration reform at the White House in Washington, U.S. January 9, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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U.S. President Donald Trump, flanked by U.S. Representative Martha McSally (R-AZ) and Senator Dick Durbin (D-IL), holds a bipartisan meeting with legislators on immigration reform at the White House in Washington, U.S. January 9, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump holds a bipartisan meeting with legislators on immigration reform at the White House in Washington, U.S. January 9, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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U.S. President Donald Trump, center, listens while U.S. House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, a Democrat from Maryland, right, speaks during a meeting with bipartisan members of Congress on immigration in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018. Trump�indicated he's willing to split contentious immigration proposals into two stages, providing protections for young immigrants known as dreamers and increasing border security first, leaving tougher negotiations on comprehensive legislation for later. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 09: Republican and Democrat members of Congress, including Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR), Sen. Michael Bennet (D-CO), Sen. Mazie Hirono (D-HI) and others join President Donald Trump for a meeting on immigration in the Cabinet Room at the White House January 9, 2018 in Washington, DC. In addition to seeking bipartisan solutions to immigration reform, Trump advocated for the reintroduction of earmarks as a way to break the legislative stalemate in Congress. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
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“Pastor, please,” host Erin Burnett said before turning to CNN analyst Kirsten Nelson.

“What you just were quoting was about the government,” Nelson stated.

“We’re talking about the people coming over. What you’re basically saying is if you come from a sh**hole country that you’re a sh**hole person. That’s not correct.”

“This country is filled with people who came from terrible countries, terrible governments and they fled here and they came here,” the analyst went on.

“That’s the exact kind of people I think a pastor would be saying, we would want them to come to the country, and they’ve been major contributors to this country.”

Pastor Mark Burns was forced to admit that as a church leader, it is his job to help the poor and the homeless.

“But don’t let them into your home, God forbid,” Burnett said sarcastically.

Watch the exchange for yourself below. 

The post CNN panel erupts after black televangelist Pastor Mark Burns gives biblical defense for Trump appeared first on theGrio.

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