Top Democrat: Trump's 's---hole countries' comment reveals he really wants the US to be a 'white society'

  • Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California said President Donald Trump's "shithole countries" comment is proof he wants the US to be a "white society."
  • "If the president can’t control himself and lead this country with the authority, dignity and leadership it requires, then he shouldn’t be the president," she said in a Friday statement.
  • "There’s no room for racism in the Oval Office."

Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California said in a Friday statement that President Donald Trump's comment referring to what he perceived to be "shithole countries" revealed that he would prefer to see the US be a "homogeneous, white society."

The comments, which Trump seemed to deny but Democratic and Republican senators have confirmed, have sparked an international firestorm since The Washington Post first reported on them Thursday. The Post reported that Trump asked why the US accepts immigrants from "shithole countries," such as Haiti, El Salvador, and African nations during an Oval Office meeting with lawmakers earlier in the day.

"Why are we having all these people from shithole countries come here?" Trump said.  

Trump added that the US should instead accept more immigrants from countries such as Norway, whose prime minister he had met the previous day.

10 PHOTOS
Politicians, pundits sound off on Trump's reported 's---hole' comment
See Gallery
Politicians, pundits sound off on Trump's reported 's---hole' comment
President Trump reportedly used the word 'shithole' to describe African nations. Pundits and politicians were quick to respond ...
The anniversary of the devastating earthquake 8 years ago is a day to remember the tragedy, honor the resilient peo… https://t.co/58mOD3wtR8
It’s not how a president should speak. It’s not how a president should behave. Most of all, it’s not what a preside… https://t.co/9XqCQfB056
.@realDonaldTrump, your mouth is the foulest shithole in the world. With what authority do you proclaim who’s welco… https://t.co/4iGagdJPk3
If the president can’t control himself and lead this country with the authority, dignity and leadership it requires… https://t.co/1otyo1CJh6
SHAME ON TRUMP! The world is witnessing a new low today with this #ShitholeNations remark! totally unacceptable! un… https://t.co/m4YxbnHaxz
Trump Administration leading a race to the bottom on refugees and immigrants that is a betrayal of America’s future… https://t.co/PpSsf2iBRR
#NBONYCdaily Worth noting though what @POTUS thinks of #Africa ..direct flights to a s*******. Cartoon for… https://t.co/R6ocsCAJV6
President @realDonaldTrump has called Africa a shithole. How America elected a narcissist, racist, white supremacis… https://t.co/KdATPCFq24
Paul Ryan on Trump’s remark: “First thing that came to my mind is, ‘Very unfortunate. Unhelpful.’” Then, he thought… https://t.co/FZfWMvfzwm
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

"The president’s expressed desire to see more immigrants from countries like Norway must be called out for what it is: an effort to set this country back generations by promoting a homogeneous, white society," Feinstein said. "The president’s words make the jobs of Americans stationed all over the world harder — soldiers, diplomats and businesses. Hate crimes against Muslims, Jews, LGBT individuals and other minorities have increased over the past two years. White nationalism, which led to the death of a peaceful protester in August, is on the rise."

"We all need to stop pretending that there are no consequences when the most powerful person in the world espouses racist views and gives a wink and a nod to the darkest elements in our society," she added. "If the president can’t control himself and lead this country with the authority, dignity and leadership it requires, then he shouldn’t be the president. There’s no room for racism in the Oval Office."

Earlier on Friday, Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois, who was in the Thursday Oval Office meeting, said Trump made the "hate-filled, vile, and racist" remarks that were reported.

"You've seen the comments in the press — I have not read one of them that's inaccurate," he said. To no surprise, the president started tweeting this morning denying that he using those words. It is not true. He said these hate-filled things, and he said them repeatedly."

23 PHOTOS
Senator Dianne Feinstein through the years
See Gallery
Senator Dianne Feinstein through the years
San Francisco's mayor Dianne Feinstein smiling and reviewing a document in her city hall office.
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 11: Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., talks with reporters before a Senate Judiciary Committee markup in Dirksen Building on the 'Amy, Vicky, and Andy Child Pornography Victim Assistance Act of 2017' and judicial nominations on January 11, 2018. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
San Francisco Mayor & Dem. gubernatorial hopeful Dianne Feinstein speaking on telephone in private box during NFL game between San Francisco 49ers & Seattle Seahawks; looking at aide. (Photo by Kim Komenich/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)
California Governor Gray Davis (L) chats with Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) on his campaign plane during a three-day tour of California, October 4, 2003. Davis faces a recall election October 7. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson LN/GAC
Democratic Senator Dianne Feinstein is chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee. Her staff is responsible for spearheading the 6,000-page report set to be released Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014, on the interrogation tactics used by the CIA during the George W. Bush years, which President Obama and others have labeled as torture.
US President 's first Supreme Court nominee, Ruth Bader Ginsburg (left) is greeted by the first two women to serve on the Senate Judicary Committee - Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) and Carol Moseley-Braun (D-IL), right - on July 20 prior to the opening of Ginsburg's confirmati on hearings on Capitol Hill
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 20: Committee Chairman Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) administers the oath for Acting Director at the National Counterterrorism Center Nicholas Rasmussen during his confirmation hearing before the Senate (Select) Intelligence Committee on November 20, 2014 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. Rasmussen has been nominated to lead the National Counterterrorism Center and he will become the next director if confirmed by the Senate. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) (L) welcomes U.S. Supreme Court nominee Judge Neil Gorsuch (R) in her office on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., February 6, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Senator Dianne Feinstein, a Democrat from California, talks to reporters after a private meeting the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Nov. 13, 2014. U.S. Senate Democrats plan to elevate first-term Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren to their leadership ranks on an expanded communications and policy committee led by third-ranking Democrat Charles Schumer. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 12: U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein gets off a escalator at the U.S. Capitol building November 12, 2014 in Washington, DC. Congress returned to work today following last week's mid-term election break. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Ranking Member Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) speaks with Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) during a meeting of the Senate Judiciary Committee to discuss the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., U.S., April 3, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 05: Committee chairman Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) (L) listens to an aide during a hearing before the Senate (Select) Intelligence Committee June 5, 2014 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. The hearing was focused on 'Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) Reforms' and H.R.3361 the 'USA FREEDOM Act.' (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Ranking member Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) and Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-IA) preside over the Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch (not pictured) on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., March 20, 2017. REUTERS/James Lawler Duggan
Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) speaks to reporters after the Senate approved $15.25 billion in aid for areas affected by Hurricane Harvey along with measures that would fund the federal government and raise its borrowing limit on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Senate Judiciary Committee ranking member Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) speaks during FBI Director James Comey's appearance before a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on "Oversight of the Federal Bureau of Investigation" on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., May 3, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
President Bill Clinton holds hands with US. Senator Dianne Feinstein (L) and California Democratic Governor Candidate Kathleen Brown (R) November 4 at a Democratic party rally on the steps of Los Angeles City Hall. Clinton urged voters to elect Brown and re-elect Fienstein, saying he needs them on his team
California State Assemblyman and Democratic Party Congressional candidate Mike Honda raises his arm along with California Senator Dianne Feinstein (D/CA) (L) at a campaign rally at Honda headquarters in San Jose, California, on November 1, 2000. Honda is locked in a tight race with Republican Party candidate Jim Cunneen to represent California's 15th Congressional District. The seat is being vacated by Republican Representative Tom Campbell who is running for the U.S. Senate against Feinstein. LD
Senator Dianne Feinstein addresses supporters November 7 at a pre-election day rally at her campaign headquarters
U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) laughs during an election party in San Francisco, California, November 7, 2006. REUTERS/Kimberly White (UNITED STATES)
(Original Caption) San Diego: On the end of a two-day, 5-city campaign tour, former San Francisco Mayor Dianne Feinstein announces her intention to seek the Democratic nomination for California governor in the June 5th primary election. Speaking to the San Diego media on the issues, she challenged opponent Calif. Atty. Gen. John Van de Kamp to a series of 6 debates.
MEET THE PRESS -- Pictured: (l-r) Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) appears on 'Meet the Press' in Washington, D.C., Sunday, Dec. 3, 2017. (Photo by: William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 6: (L to R) Committee chairman Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-IA), ranking member Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), and Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) talk with each other during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing concerning firearm accessory regulation and enforcing federal and state reporting to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) on Capitol Hill, December 6, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Senator Dianne Feinstein, a Democrat from California and ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, listens during a hearing with Jeff Sessions, U.S. attorney general, not pictured, in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. Sessions�told senators he won't answer questions about his conversations with President�Donald Trump�over the firing of FBI Director�James Comey. Photographer: Zach Gibson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

The group of bipartisan lawmakers were negotiating immigration legislation with the hope of resolving the fate of young immigrants protected from deportation by the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which the administration is phasing out. Earlier this week, the administration announced it would end Temporary Protected Status for 200,000 Salvadorans, 45,000 Haitians, and 2,500 Nicaraguans.

Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, also in the meeting, confirmed Trump's comments to fellow South Carolina Republican Sen. Tim Scott, who told The Post & Courier that the remarks which were reported were "basically accurate," according to Graham.

Trump sought to knock down the onslaught of negative attention in a series of Friday tweets. Trump said he used "tough" language in the meeting but suggested the vulgar remark reported was "not the language used."

Republican Sens. David Perdue of Georgia and Tom Cotton of Arkansas, both close allies of Trump, said in a statement that they did "not recall" Trump making the remark during the Thursday meeting.

Earlier this week, Trump went after Feinstein for unilaterally releasing an interview transcript from Fusion GPS's testimony to the Senate Judiciary Committee, on which Feinstein is the top Democrat. Fusion GPS is the firm that commissioned the dossier containing allegations of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russian officials.

"The fact that Sneaky Dianne Feinstein, who has on numerous occasions stated that collusion between Trump/Russia has not been found, would release testimony in such an underhanded and possibly illegal way, totally without authorization, is a disgrace," he tweeted. "Must have tough Primary!"

NOW WATCH: Here's how the map of the United States has changed in 200 years

See Also:

SEE ALSO: 'Washington almost always gives people a second chance': Everyone's wondering what Steve Bannon will do next after his stunning downfall

Read Full Story