School homework asks kids to give 3 'good' reasons for slavery

A private Christian school in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin, is under fire after asking fourth-graders to lay out three “good” reasons for slavery as part of a homework assignment.

On Monday, the students at Our Redeemer Lutheran School were handed a social studies worksheet that told them to “give 3 ‘good’ reasons for slavery and 3 bad reasons.”

Trameka Brown-Berry, who has a 9-year-old son in the class, told Fox 6 that she was in “shock” over the “highly offensive and insensitive” assignment.

RELATED: Countries with highestpercent of population in slavery

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Countries with highest percent of population in slavery
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Countries with highest percent of population in slavery

T-6. Central African Republic

Population: 4,900,000
Estimated number in modern slavery: 55,400

Estimated percent in modern slavery: 1.130

(Photo by Tony Wheeler via Getty Images)

T-6. Libya

Population: 6,278,000
Estimated number in modern slavery: 70,900

Estimated percent in modern slavery: 1.130

(Photo via Getty Images)

T-6. Somalia

Population: 10,787,000
Estimated number in modern slavery: 121,900

Estimated percent in modern slavery: 1.130

(Photo via Getty Images)

T-6. South Sudan

Population: 12,340,000
Estimated number in modern slavery: 139,400

Estimated percent in modern slavery: 1.130

(Photo by Figula Photography via Getty Images)

T-6. Syria

Population: 22,769,000
Estimated number in modern slavery: 257,300

Estimated percent in modern slavery: 1.130

(Photo by Andrew Pistolesi via Getty Images)

T-6. Yemen

Population: 26,832,000
Estimated number in modern slavery: 303,200

Estimated percent in modern slavery: 1.130

(Photo by Mohannad Khatib via Getty Images)

T-6. Afghanistan

Population: 32,527,000
Estimated number in modern slavery: 367,600

Estimated percent in modern slavery: 1.130

(Photo via Getty Images)

T-6. Iraq

Population: 35,730,000
Estimated number in modern slavery: 403,800

Estimated percent in modern slavery: 1.130

(Photo by Michael Runkel via Getty Images)

T-6. Sudan

Population: 40,235,000
Estimated number in modern slavery: 454,700

Estimated percent in modern slavery: 1.130

(Photo by Reinhard Dirscherl via Getty Images)

T-6. Democratic Republic of the Congo

Population: 77,267,000
Estimated number in modern slavery: 873,100

Estimated percent in modern slavery: 1.130

(Photo by Roger de la Harpe via Getty Images)

T-6. Pakistan

Population: 188,925,000
Estimated number in modern slavery: 2,134,900

Estimated percent in modern slavery: 1.130

(Photo by Paul Williams via Getty Images)

5. Qatar

Population: 2,235,000
Estimated number in modern slavery: 30,300

Estimated percent in modern slavery: 1.356

(Photo by Allan Baxter via Getty Images)

4. India

Population: 1,311,051,000
Estimated number in modern slavery: 18,354,700

Estimated percent in modern slavery: 1.4000

(Photo by David Freund via Getty Images)

3. Cambodia

Population: 15,578,000
Estimated number in modern slavery: 256,800

Estimated percent in modern slavery: 1.648

(Photo via Getty Images)

2. Uzbekistan

Population: 31,125,000
Estimated number in modern slavery: 1,236,600

Estimated percent in modern slavery: 3.973

(Photo by Rosmarie Wirz via Getty Images)

1. North Korea

Population: 25,155,000
Estimated number in modern slavery: 1,100,000

Estimated percent in modern slavery: 4.373

(Photo by Berthold Trenkel via Getty Images)

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“I couldn’t believe they sent something like that home,” Brown-Berry said. “Not only was my son in an awful position, but the students who weren’t black ― that’s what keeps racism going.”

She posted a photo of the homework on Facebook.

“I feel there is no good reason for slavery that’s why I did not write,” her son answered, as shown in the post.

Principal Jim Van Dellen sent a letter to parents with an apology and said that the teacher didn’t properly describe the task to students, according to the station WISN

“We understand that, as presented, the words used showed a lack of sensitivity and were offensive,” Van Dellen wrote. “The purpose of the assignment was not, in any way, to have students argue that ANY slavery is acceptable ― a concept that goes against our core values and beliefs about the equality and worth of people of all races.”

The assignment was intended to spark debate in the class, he told Fox 6, adding that it has been pulled from the curriculum.

Brown-Berry shared an update on Facebook stating that she met with the principal and that he agreed to mandate “cultural diversity/cultural competency inservice [training for faculty] to prevent this from happening again.”

Our Redeemer Lutheran School did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

RELATED: White supremacy in America

11 PHOTOS
White supremacy in America
See Gallery
White supremacy in America
A member of the Ku Klux Klan gestures as he marches during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. A Ku Klux Klan chapter and an African-American group planned overlapping demonstrations on Saturday outside the South Carolina State House, where state officials removed the Confederate battle flag last week. REUTERS/Chris Keane
A member of a white supremacy group gives the fascist salute during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES) REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A member of a white supremacy group shouts during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A member of a white supremacy group stands behind a flag with a swastika during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A member of the Ku Klux Klan who says his name is Gary Munker poses for a photo during an interview with AFP in Hampton Bays, New York on November 22, 2016. Munker says his local branch of the KKK, which has recently placed recruitment flyers on car windshields on Long Island, has seen around 1,000 enquiries from people interested in joining since the election of Donald Trump. / AFP / William EDWARDS (Photo credit should read WILLIAM EDWARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
Members of a white supremacy group give the fascist salute during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A supporter of the Ku Klux Klan is seen with his tattoos during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Keane
A member of the Ku Klux Klan gestures as he listens to the crowd while carrying a Confederate flag during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Keane
A member of the Ku Klux Klan yells during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. A Ku Klux Klan chapter and an African-American group planned overlapping demonstrations on Saturday outside the South Carolina State House, where state officials removed the Confederate battle flag last week.REUTERS/Chris Keane
Members of the Ku Klux Klan yell as they fly Confederate flags during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. A Ku Klux Klan chapter and an African-American group planned overlapping demonstrations on Saturday outside the South Carolina State House, where state officials removed the Confederate battle flag last week. REUTERS/Chris Keane? TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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  • This article originally appeared on HuffPost.
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