The kitchen stoves of Thomas Jefferson's enslaved chef have been unearthed

The remains of the stoves used by one of the most masterful chefs around during the early days of the United States have been unearthed.

Those stoves belonged to James Hemings who was the cook for future President Thomas Jefferson. Hemings was also a slave. 

Hemings was taught in kitchens in France and introduced meringues, creme brûlée and macaroni and cheese to American cooking, according to the Thomas Jefferson Foundation. 

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Monticello -- home of Thomas Jefferson
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Monticello -- home of Thomas Jefferson

Charlottesville, VA

Monticello, home of Thomas Jefferson is working to more fully integrate the stories of the enslaved at the historic plantation, Monday, February 6, 2017.

(Photo by Norm Shafer/ For The Washington Post via Getty Images).

Charlottesville, VA

Visitors to Monticello take a slavery tour Monday, February 6, 2017 at Monticello. At left is t. servant's house a dwelling for an enslaved family. The Hemings family were likely residents of the cabin.

(Photo by Norm Shafer/ For The Washington Post via Getty Images).

Charlottesville, VA

Crystal Ptacek, Archaeological Field Research Manager at Monticello and Craig Kelley, Senior Archeological Field Assistant work on excavating the first kitch, part of the South Dependency at Monticello, Monday, February 6, 2017.

(Photo by Norm Shafer/ For The Washington Post via Getty Images).

Charlottesville, VA

Allison Mueller, an archeologist field assistant sifts dirt looking for artifacts along the south dependency at Monticello, Monday, February 6, 2017 at Monticello.

(Photo by Norm Shafer/ For The Washington Post via Getty Images).

Charlottesville, VA

Gardens flank Mulberry Row, the industrial hub of Jeffersons Monticello.

(Photo by Norm Shafer/ For The Washington Post via Getty Images).

Charlottesville, VA

Niya Bates, Public Historian of Slavery and African American Life in front of t. servant's house a dwelling for an enslaved family at Monticello, Monday, February 6, 2017.

(Photo by Norm Shafer/ For The Washington Post via Getty Images).

Charlottesville, VA

Fragments of Chinese porcelain are displayed on a sifting screen, Monday, February 6, 2017 at Monticello. They were found in an excavation being done of the first kitchen, part of the South Dependency at Monticello.

(Photo by Norm Shafer/ For The Washington Post via Getty Images).

Charlottesville, VA

Various artigacts are displayed Monday, February 6, 2017 at Monticello. They were found in an excavation being done of the first kitchen, part of the South Dependency at Monticello.

(Photo by Norm Shafer/ For The Washington Post via Getty Images).

Charlottesville, VA

Joshua DuBois, Values Partnership Initiative, Brandon Andrews, Values Partnership Initiative and Crystal Ptacek, Archaeological Field Research Manager at Monticello listen to Fraser D. Neiman, Director of Archaeology at Monticello in the South Wing where archeological excavations are being done to learn more about the lives of the enslaved people at Monticello, Monday, February 6, 2017.

(Photo by Norm Shafer/ For The Washington Post via Getty Images).

Charlottesville, VA

This room, part of the South Dependency of Monticello is going to be restored as the residence of Sally Hemings. Monticello is currently working to more fully integrate the stories of the enslaved at the historic plantation, Tuesday February 6, 2017.

(Photo by Norm Shafer/ For The Washington Post via Getty Images).

Former U.S. President Barack Obama and French President Francois Hollande tour the outside of the Virginia residence of Thomas Jefferson with Leslie Greene Bowman, president and CEO of the Thomas Jefferson foundation, at Monticello in Charlottesville, February 10, 2014. Jefferson was one of the United States' earliest envoys to France.

(REUTERS/Larry Downing)

Former U.S. President Barack Obama and French President Francois Hollande tour the Virginia residence of Thomas Jefferson with Leslie Greene Bowman, president and CEO of the Thomas Jefferson foundation, at Monticello in Charlottesville, February 10, 2014. Jefferson was one of the United States' earliest envoys to France.

(REUTERS/Larry Downing)

Charlottesville VA,

April 23, 2011

President Thomas Jefferson's home, Monticello, with tulips in foreground.

(marcnorman via Getty Images)

Charlottesville, VA - February 6: This room, part of the South Dependency of Monticello is going to be restored as the residence of Sally Hemings. Monticello is currently working to more fully integrate the stories of the enslaved at the historic plantation, Tuesday February 6, 2017. (Photo by Norm Shafer/ For The Washington Post via Getty Images).
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The director of archeology at Monticello, where Jefferson lived, said it’s one of the "really rare instances where we can associate a workspace and artifact with a particular enslaved individual whose name we know."

It’s possible that the stew stoves were part of a kitchen upgrade by Jefferson once Hemings came back from France. 

Hemings was technically a free man while in Paris, but it is believed he returned to America to be with his family in Virginia. 

Hemings did strike a deal with Jefferson to become a free man in 1796. He would return to the Monticello kitchen in 1801, when Jefferson became president, before apparently committing suicide in Baltimore shortly after he left.

Of the 600 people Jefferson owned, he only freed two of them. 

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