Poll: Oprah tops Trump with likely voters in 2020 election

President Donald Trump was asked whether he would beat Oprah Winfrey in a presidential contest on Tuesday, to which he replied, "Yeah I'll beat Oprah. Oprah would be a lot of fun."

Despite the U.S. commander in chief's confidence, a new Rassmussen Reports poll suggests a hypothetical Winfrey bid could prove successful.

According to the latest Rasmussen Reports survey released on Wednesday, 48 percent of likely U.S. voters would choose Oprah -- an iconic entertainment mogul -- while 38 percent would opt for the current Republican president.

An additional 14 percent are "undecided" on the matchup, signaling Oprah -- who has no political or government experience to date -- could potentially gain or lose support if she decided to roll out a presidential platform.

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People who might run against Trump in 2020

Former Vice President Joe Biden

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Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.)

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.)

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Sen. Kamala Davis (D-Calif.)

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Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.)

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Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.)

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Facebook CEO and founder Mark Zuckerberg

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Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.)

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Former U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (D)

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Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.)

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Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper

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New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo

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Former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley

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Former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro

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Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.)

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Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.)

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Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio)

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Former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick

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New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio

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Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban

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Environmental activist Tom Steyer

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Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez

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Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton 

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Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe

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California Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom

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Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg

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Former first lady Michelle Obama

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Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz

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Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson

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Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii)

(Photo credit TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)

Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.)

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Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-N.Y)

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California Gov. Jerry Brown

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Media mogul Oprah Winfrey

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Former Sen. Russ Feingold (D-Wis.)

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Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean

(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Former Vice President Al Gore

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Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.)

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Former Sen. Jim Webb (D-Va.)

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Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti

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Rep. Seth Moulton (D-Mass.)

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New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu

Albin Lohr-Jones/Pool via Bloomberg

Sen. Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.)

(Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee

(Photo by Karen Ducey/Getty Images)


Oprah Winfrey's emotional speech at the Golden Globes on Sunday night immediately triggered a wave of pundit commentary surrounding what a bid from the billionaire would look like.

Brian Stelter of CNN reported on Monday that two "close friends" of Oprah's say she is "actively thinking" about a presidential bid, while Winfrey's own partner said the decision is "up to the people."

Polling outlets have surveyed Oprah's popularity in the past, and a March 2017 Quinnipiac poll found Oprah with a 52 percent favorability rating and massive 72 percent favorability rating with Democrats. The latest Rasmussen poll shows Oprah with a 55 percent general favorability, and 27 percent "very favorable" rating.

And yet despite that strong popularity return for the television personality, 69 percent of respondents to the March 2017 poll said she shouldn't run for president.

Among those who have weighed in on a hypothetical Oprah campaign is former Trump press secretary Sean Spicer, who said she doesn't have the "political infrastructure" necessary for a presidential candidate.

"We’ve seen this before in our history," Spicer continued. "Where people who have tried to pop in that are not in politics and have had a difficult time adjusting."

The Rasmussen Reports survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted January 8-9, 2018 and has a margin of sampling error of three percentage points.

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