Steve Bannon out at Breitbart

Right wing firebrand Steve Bannon's rapid fall from grace continued Tuesday as he was removed from his post at the head of the Breitbart News media organization.

Breitbart CEO Larry Solov said in a statement on the organization's website: "Steve is a valued part of our legacy, and we will always be grateful for his contributions, and what he has helped us to accomplish."

Bannon, in the same post, said he was "proud of what the Breitbart team has accomplished in so short a period of time in building out a world-class news platform."

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Donald Trump and Steve Bannon

US President Donald Trump (L) congratulates Senior Counselor to the President Stephen Bannon during the swearing-in of senior staff in the East Room of the White House on January 22, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. President Donald Trump (L-R), is joined by Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, Vice President Mike Pence, senior advisor Steve Bannon, Communications Director Sean Spicer and National Security Advisor Michael Flynn, as he speaks by phone with Russia's President Vladimir Putin in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, U.S., January 28, 2017. Jonathan Ernst: "Very early in the Trump administration, weekends were as busy as weekdays. On Trump's second Saturday the official schedule said he would be making private phone calls to a number of world leaders including Russia's Vladimir Putin. I arrived early and, before sitting down at my desk walked up to Press Secretary Sean Spicer's office. He, too, was just taking his coat off. I gingerly made the suggestion that previous administrations had sometimes allowed photos of such phone calls through the Oval Office windows on the colonnade. To my mild shock, he didn't even think about it twice. "We'll do it!" he said. In truth, I really only expected the Putin call, but we were outside the windows multiple times throughout the day as the calls went on."

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

U.S. President Donald Trump talks to chief strategist Steve Bannon during a swearing in ceremony for senior staff at the White House in Washington, U.S. January 22, 2017.

(REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

Trump advisers Steve Bannon (L) and Jared Kushner (R) listen as U.S. President Donald Trump meets with members of his Cabinet at the White House in Washington, U.S., June 12, 2017.

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump (C) and campaign CEO Steve Bannon (R) listen to National Park Service Interpretive Park Ranger Caitlin Kostic (2nd R) on a brief visit to Gettysburg National Military Park in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. October 22, 2016.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

U.S. President Donald Trump (L-R), joined by Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, Vice President Mike Pence, senior advisor Steve Bannon, Communications Director Sean Spicer and National Security Advisor Michael Flynn, speaks by phone with Russia's President Vladimir Putin in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, U.S. January 28, 2017.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

U.S. President Donald Trump signs a memorandum to security services directing them to defeat the Islamic State in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, U.S. January 28, 2017. Pictured with him are White House senior advisor Steve Bannon (L-R), National Economic Council Director Gary Cohn, Vice President Mike Pence, Deputy National Security Advisor K. T. McFarland, National Security Advisor Michael Flynn, National Security Council Chief of Staff Keith Kellogg and senior advisor Kellyanne Conway.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Trump advisor Steve Bannon (L) watches as US President Donald Trump greets Elon Musk, SpaceX and Tesla CEO, before a policy and strategy forum with executives in the State Dining Room of the White House February 3, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

Senior Advisor Jared Kusher, White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon and President Donald Trump arrive at the start of a meeting with Senate and House legislators, in the Roosevelt Room at the White House, February 2, 2017 in Washington, DC. Lawmakers included in the meeting were Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT), Rep. Kevin Brady (R-TX), Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) and Rep. Richard Neal (D-MA).

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

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Just a year ago, Bannon was a newly installed senior adviser to then President-elect Trump, having joined Trump's campaign in the summer of 2016. He was characterized for much of the first few months of Trump's presidency as the brains behind the president, and was lampooned on Saturday Night Live as the grim reaper who told Trump what to do.

But that image of Bannon as the real president infuriated Trump, according to multiple reports, and undermined Bannon's influence in the White House. He left in August and immediately returned to Breitbart, which he first took over in 2012, not long after the death of its founder, Andrew Breitbart.

Bannon was regarded by the press as a powerful figure, and he moved quickly to demonstrate that he could have a real impact on events by throwing his support behind Alabama Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore.

Moore defeated Sen. Luther Strange in a late September special election primary, just days after Trump campaigned for Strange. And yet Bannon described himself as fighting to uphold and strengthen the Trump presidency.

Moore's candidacy, however, was the first major step in Bannon's undoing. Allegations of molesting teenage girls sunk the Republican, who lost to Democrat Doug Jones on Dec. 12.

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Steve Bannon campaigns with Roy Moore
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Steve Bannon campaigns with Roy Moore
Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Judge Roy Moore speaks during a campaign event in Fairhope, Alabama, U.S., December 5, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Judge Roy Moore and former White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon shake hands during a campaign event in Fairhope, Alabama, U.S., December 5, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
Buttons in support of Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Judge Roy Moore are seen before a campaign rally in Fairhope, Alabama, U.S., December 5, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
Former White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon campaigns for Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Judge Roy Moore during a rally in Fairhope, Alabama, U.S., December 5, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
Supporters attend a campaign event held for Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Judge Roy Moore in Fairhope, Alabama, U.S., December 5, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
Former White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon speaks during a campaign event for Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Judge Roy Moore in Fairhope, Alabama, U.S., December 5, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
Former White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon speaks during a campaign event for Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Judge Roy Moore in Fairhope, Alabama, U.S., December 5, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
Chu Green holds a sign during a campaign rally held for Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Judge Roy Moore in Fairhope, Alabama, U.S., December 5, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
Former White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon speaks during a campaign event for Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Judge Roy Moore in Fairhope, Alabama, U.S., December 5, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Judge Roy Moore kisses his wife Kayla Moore during a campaign rally in Fairhope, Alabama, U.S., December 5, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
Protesters stand outside of a campaign event held for Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Judge Roy Moore in Fairhope, Alabama, U.S., December 5, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
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And then last week Bannon's comments to author Michael Wolff leaked out ahead of the publication of Wolff's book. Trump was said to be incensed by Bannon's characterization of the 2016 meeting in Trump Tower between Trump campaignaides and family members, including Donald Trump Jr., and a representative of the Russian government, as "treasonous."

A few days afterward, Bannon's chief financial patron, Rebekah Mercer, announced that she and her family were no longer providing money to Bannon. "My family and I have not communicated with Steve Bannon in many months and have provided no financial support to his political agenda, nor do we support his recent actions and statements," she said.

Rumors of Bannon's ouster from Breitbart began circulating not long after.

Bannon did not respond to a question, sent by text message, about his future plans.

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