Judge drops all charges against Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy over 'flagrant prosecutorial misconduct'

A federal judge has dropped all charges against Cliven Bundy and three others involved in the Bundy ranch standoff over cattle grazing rights in 2014.

According to AZ Central News, Bundy was accused of leading an armed rebellion against federal agents to block a roundup of his cattle from public lands.

However, district judge Gloria Navarro has dropped the charges, citing "flagrant prosecutorial misconduct," and she says her court found a violation of the "universal sense of justice," and found the prosecutor's actions "outrageous" and said they "violated due process rights" of the defendants.  

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Rancher Cliven Bundy looks out over his 160 acre ranch in Bunkerville, Nevada May 3, 2014. When the U.S. government declared the Mojave desert tortoise an endangered species in 1989, it effectively marked the cattle ranchers of Nevada's Clark County for extinction. Bundy once had neighbors on the range: when the tortoise was listed, there were about 50 cattle-ranching families in the county. Some of them fought court battles to stay, rejecting the idea their cattle posed a danger to the tortoises. But, one by one, they slowly gave up and disappeared. Picture taken May 3, 2014. To match Insight USA-RANCHERS/NEVADA-TORTOISES/ REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CRIME LAW ENVIRONMENT)
BUNKERVILLE, NV - APRIL 24: Rancher Cliven Bundy speaks during a news conference near his ranch in Bunkerville, Nevada. The Bureau of Land Management and Bundy have been locked in a dispute for a couple of decades over grazing rights on public lands. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)
Cliven Bundy is pictured in this undated booking handout image provided by the Multnomah County Sheriff's Office, February 11, 2016. Bundy was arrested on Wednesday when he arrived at Portland International Airport on his way to the wildlife refuge to support the militants, according to the Oregonian newspaper. REUTERS/Multnomah County Sheriff's Office/Handout via Reuters ATTENTION EDITORS - FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
BUNKERVILLE, NV - APRIL 24: Rancher Cliven Bundy speaks during a news conference along the Virgin River near his ranch on April 24, 2014 in Bunkerville, Nevada. The Bureau of Land Management and Bundy have been locked in a dispute for a couple of decades over grazing rights on public lands. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)
Rancher Cliven Bundy stands near a metal gate on his 160 acre ranch in Bunkerville, Nevada May 3, 2014. When the U.S. government declared the Mojave desert tortoise an endangered species in 1989, it effectively marked the cattle ranchers of Nevada's Clark County for extinction. Bundy once had neighbors on the range: when the tortoise was listed, there were about 50 cattle-ranching families in the county. Some of them fought court battles to stay, rejecting the idea their cattle posed a danger to the tortoises. But, one by one, they slowly gave up and disappeared. Picture taken May 3, 2014. To match Insight USA-RANCHERS/NEVADA-TORTOISES/ REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CRIME LAW ENVIRONMENT)
BUNKERVILLE, NV - APRIL 24: Rancher Cliven Bundy (R) leaves the podium with body guards after a news conference near his ranch on April 24, 2014 in Bunkerville, Nevada. Bundy and the Bureau of Land Management have been locked in a dispute for a couple of decades over grazing rights on public lands. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)
BUNKERVILLE, NV - APRIL 24: Carol Cox points out her buttons as she supports her cousin, rancher Cliven Bundy, before a news conference on April 24, 2014 in Bunkerville, Nevada. Bundy and the Bureau of Land Management have been locked in a dispute for a couple of decades over grazing rights on public lands. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)
BUNKERVILLE, NV - APRIL 24: American flags flies near a highway sign alerting motorists of possible cattle along Nevada Highway 170 on April 24, 2014 in Bunkerville, Nevada. Rancher Cliven Bundy and the Bureau of Land Management have been locked in a dispute for a couple of decades over grazing rights on public lands. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)
BUNKERVILLE, NV - APRIL 24: A Cliven Bundy exits a portable toliet before a news conference on April 24, 2014 in Bunkerville, Nevada. Rancher Cliven Bundy and the Bureau of Land Management have been locked in a dispute for a couple of decades over grazing rights on public lands. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)
BUNKERVILLE, NV - APRIL 24: American flags flies along Nevada Highway 170 near rancher Cliven Bundy's ranch on April 24, 2014 in Bunkerville, Nevada. Bundy and the Bureau of Land Management have been locked in a dispute for a couple of decades over grazing rights on public lands. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)
BUNKERVILLE, NV - APRIL 24: Rancher Cliven Bundy (2nd R) speaks during a news conference along the Virgin River near his ranch on April 24, 2014 in Bunkerville, Nevada. The Bureau of Land Management and Bundy have been locked in a dispute for a couple of decades over grazing rights on public lands. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)
MESQUITE, NV - APRIL 11: People mill around the outside of rancher Cliven Bundy ranch house on April 11, 2014 west of Mesquite, Nevada. Bureau of Land Management officials are rounding up Cliven Bundy's cattle, he has been locked in a dispute with the BLM for a couple of decades over grazing rights. (Photo by George Frey/Getty Images
MESQUITE, NV - APRIL 10: Protesters hang signs along US. highway 170 protesting the closure of thousands of acres of Bureau of Land Management land that has been temporarily closed to round-up illegal cattle that are grazing south of Mesquite Nevada on April 10, 2014 in Mesquite, Nevada. BLM officials are rounding up ranchers Cliven Bundy's cattle, who has been locked in a dispute with the BLM for a couple of decades over grazing rights. (Photo by George Frey/Getty Images
MESQUITE, NV - APRIL 10: Protest signs are posted along US. highway 170 protesting the closure of thousands of acres of Bureau of Land Management land that has been temporarily closed to round-up illegal cattle that are grazing south of Mesquite Nevada on April 10, 2014 in Mesquite, Nevada. BLM officials are rounding up ranchers Cliven Bundy's cattle, who has been locked in a dispute with the BLM for a couple of decades over grazing rights. (Photo by George Frey/Getty Images
MESQUITE, NV - APRIL 10: Protesters hang signs on a fence along US. highway 170 protesting the closure of thousands of acres of Bureau of Land Management land that has been temporarily closed to round-up illegal cattle that are grazing south of Mesquite Nevada on April 10, 2014 in Mesquite, Nevada. BLM officials are rounding up ranchers Cliven Bundy's cattle, who has been locked in a dispute with the BLM for a couple of decades over grazing rights. (Photo by George Frey/Getty Images
Cliven Bundy is pictured in this undated booking handout image provided by the Multnomah County Sheriff's Office, February 11, 2016. Bundy was arrested on Wednesday when he arrived at Portland International Airport on his way to the wildlife refuge to support the militants, according to the Oregonian newspaper. REUTERS/Multnomah County Sheriff's Office/Handout via Reuters ATTENTION EDITORS - FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
Rancher Cliven Bundy stands in front of his two-bedroom house on his 160 acre ranch in Bunkerville, Nevada May 3, 2014. When the U.S. government declared the Mojave desert tortoise an endangered species in 1989, it effectively marked the cattle ranchers of Nevada's Clark County for extinction. Bundy once had neighbors on the range: when the tortoise was listed, there were about 50 cattle-ranching families in the county. Some of them fought court battles to stay, rejecting the idea their cattle posed a danger to the tortoises. But, one by one, they slowly gave up and disappeared. Picture taken May 3, 2014. To match Insight USA-RANCHERS/NEVADA-TORTOISES/ REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CRIME LAW ENVIRONMENT)
Buttons with images of Cliven Bundy's son Ammon Bundy and slain Arizona rancher LaVoy Finicum, are shown outside the federal courthouse in Las Vegas, Nevada U.S., November 7, 2017.REUTERS/Las Vegas Sun/Steve Marcus
KANAB, UT - FEBRUARY 5: Cliven Bundy rides a horse after attending the funeral of of fellow rancher Robert 'LaVoy' Finicum on February 5, 2016 in Kanab, Utah. Finicum who was part of the Burns, Oregon standoff with federal officials was shot and killed by FBI agents when they tried to detain him at a traffic stop on February 27, 2016. ( Photo by George Frey/Getty Images
KANAB, UT - FEBRUARY 5: Cliven Bundy, center, rides a horse after attending the funeral of of fellow rancher Robert 'LaVoy' Finicum on February 5, 2016 in Kanab, Utah. Finicum who was part of the Burns, Oregon standoff with federal officials was shot and killed by FBI agents when they tried to detain him at a traffic stop on February 27, 2016. ( Photo by George Frey/Getty Images
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A month ago, she declared a mistrial when she found that prosecutors had withheld evidence from the defense. At that time, she said: "Failure to turn over such evidence violates due process A fair trial at this point is impossible."

The judge dismissed the case with prejudice, which means that the men cannot face trial for the charges again.

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