Trump attacks his own 'deep state' Justice Department


President Trump began his first full day of 2018 by attacking the Department of Justice while relaying a new report about the handling of sensitive emails by Hillary Clinton’s top aide, who served on a campaign he vanquished more than a year ago.

“Crooked Hillary Clinton’s top aid Huma Abedin, has been accused of disregarding basic security protocols,” Trump tweeted on Tuesday. “She put Classified Passwords into the hands of foreign agents. Remember sailors pictures on submarine? Jail! Deep State Justice Dept must finally act? Also on Comey & others.”

Though Trump criticized the Justice Department for supposedly being part of the “deep state,” top officials in the department were selected by him, including Attorney General Jeff Sessions, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and FBI Director Christopher Wray.

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Rod Rosenstein through the years
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Rod Rosenstein through the years
Rod Rosenstein, nominee to be Deputy Attorney General, testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington March 7, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
UNITED STATES - OCTOBER 10: U.S. Attorney Rod Rosenstein speaks during a news conference in Washington D.C. Tuesday, October 10, 2006. Rosenstein and Deputy U.S. Attorney General Paul McNulty announced the formation of a National Procurement Fraud Task Force, an effort aimed at the detection, prevention and prosecution of procurement fraud associated with increased contracting activity for national security programs. (Photo by Carol T. Powers/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - OCTOBER 10: Deputy U.S. Attorney General Paul McNulty, center, speaks during a news conference with Alice Fisher, head of the criminal division of the U.S. Department of Justice, left, and U.S. Attorney Rod Rosenstein, during a news conference in Washington D.C. Tuesday, October 10, 2006. McNulty announced the formation of a National Procurement Fraud Task Force, an effort aimed at the detection, prevention and prosecution of procurement fraud associated with increased contracting activity for national security programs. (Photo by Carol T. Powers/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
SLUG: me/hornsby DATE: August 22, 2006 CREDIT: Ricky Carioti / TWP. United States Federal Courthouse in Greenbelt, Md. Federal prosecutors announce the indictment of former Prince George's County school superintendent Andre Hornsby. United States Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein, center, flanked by Francis Turner, left, of the United States Department of the Treasury and Assistant United States Attorney Michael Pauze announce the 16-count indictment of former Prince George's County Schools Superintendent Andre Hornsby during a press conference at federal court in Greenbelt on Tuesday. (Photo by Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images)
U.S. Attorney Rod Rosenstein talks about the sentencing of Thomas Bromwell Sr. and Mary Patricia Bromwell following their appearance in federal court in Baltimore, Maryland, Friday, November 16, 2007. (Photo by Kim Hairston/Baltimore Sun/MCT via Getty Images)
GREENBELT, MD JUNE 30:United States Attorney for the District of Maryland Rod J. Rosenstein talked with reporters after the Guilty plea of Prince Georges County Councilwoman Leslie Johnson the U.S. District Court on June 30, 2011 in Greenbelt, MD. To Rosenstein's left is Acting Special Agent in Charge Jeannine A. Hammett of the Internal Revenue Service and to his right is Special Agent in Charge Richard A. McFeely of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. (Photo by Mark Gail/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
BALTIMORE, MD - OCTOBER 24: Maryland U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein, on Friday, October 24, 2014 in Baltimore, Maryland. Rosenstein said Carl Lackl was scheduled to be a witness to the Larry Haynes murder but was killed when Patrick Byers plotted his murder from his jail cell. (Photo by Michel du Cille/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Rod Rosenstein, deputy attorney general nominee for U.S. President Donald Trump, listens during a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, March 7, 2017. The confirmation hearing for Rosenstein began with Republicans and Democrats squaring off over who should lead probes into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and potential contacts between Moscow and Trumps campaign team. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Rod Rosenstein, deputy attorney general nominee for U.S. President Donald Trump, swears in to a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, March 7, 2017. The confirmation hearing for Rosenstein began with Republicans and Democrats squaring off over who should lead probes into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and potential contacts between Moscow and Trumps campaign team. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Rod Rosenstein, deputy attorney general nominee for U.S. President Donald Trump, sits during a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, March 7, 2017. The confirmation hearing for Rosenstein began with Republicans and Democrats squaring off over who should lead probes into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and potential contacts between Moscow and Trumps campaign team. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 07: Deputy U.S. Attorney General nominee Rod Rosenstein arrives before the Senate Judiciary Committee for testimony March 7, 2017 in Washington, DC. During the hearing, Democratic senators pressed Rosenstein to appoint a special prosecutor in an ongoing federal inquiry into Russian influence in the U.S. presidential election. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Rod Rosenstein, nominee to be Deputy Attorney General, arrives to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington March 7, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
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On Monday, the Daily Caller reported that Abedin forwarded “sensitive” State Department emails to her personal Yahoo email account while Clinton was secretary of state from 2009 to 2013, based on an email disclosure brought forth by a lawsuit from the conservative group Judicial Watch.

The Daily Caller — and apparently Trump — connected the forwarded emails to the high-profile hacks that affected Yahoo email accounts in 2013 and 2014. The 2014 breach involved 500 million user accounts that U.S. officials later determined were stolen by four “state-sponsored” hackers, including two officers of the Russian Federal Security Service. It’s unclear whether Abedin’s account was one of the 500 million accessed by hackers in 2014. But the 2013 breach affected all Yahoo user accounts, or approximately 3 billion, although it’s unclear who was behind the 2013 hack.

Trump appeared to suggest that Abedin should be prosecuted for her reported mishandling of emails, comparing it to the case of a former Navy sailor who was sentenced to a year in prison in 2016 for taking photos inside a U.S. submarine. The sailor, Kristian Saucier, sought a pardon from Trump, who, as a candidate, used the incident to complain that Clinton was not charged with a crime for her use of a private email server.

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Hillary Clinton aide Huma Abedin
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Hillary Clinton aide Huma Abedin
Political aide Huma Abedin arrives for the "Glamour Women of the Year Awards" in the Manhattan borough of New York November 9, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Mayorial candidate Anthony Weiner and his wife Huma Abedin campaigning on W. 111 St. (Photo by Andrew Savulich/NY Daily News via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 11: Huma Abedin and Anthony Weiner attend the 2015 amfAR New York Gala at Cipriani Wall Street on February 11, 2015 in New York City. (Photo by Larry Busacca/Getty Images)
US Democratic presidential candidate Senator Hillary Clinton (D-NY) (R) walks with her traveling chief-of-staff Huma Abedin as they approach a group of police officers after cancelling a rally in Fort Worth, Texas February 22, 2008. A Dallas police officer was killed Friday when his motorcycle struck a pillar as he was escorting democratic presidential candidate Senator Clinton to a rally in Dallas. Clinton cancelled the rally in Forth Worth, saying it would be inappropriate to hold a rally in light of the tragic circumstances. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi (UNITED STATES) US PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAMPAIGN 2008 (USA)
COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA - MAY 27: Staffer Huma Abedin helps former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton decide what special treats to buy at Main Street Bakery in Columbia, South Carolina, Wednesday, May 27, 2015. Secretary Clinton left with around dozen cupcakes. (Photo by Melina Mara/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - JANUARY 09: Huma Abedin attends Ryan Piers Williams' 'Monsters And Landscapes' Exhibition - Opening Reception at The Garfield Building on January 9, 2015 in New York City. (Photo by Desiree Navarro/WireImage)
Huma Abedin attends 'The Beguiled' screening in New York City, U.S. June 22, 2017. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute Gala - Rei Kawakubo/Comme des Garcons: Art of the In-Between - Arrivals - New York City, U.S. - 01/05/17 - Huma Abedin. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Top aide Huma Abedin (C), and Senior Policy Advisor Jake Sullivan (R) listen to U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton (not pictured) at her concession speech to President-elect Donald Trump in New York, U.S.. November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
New York mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner and his wife Huma Abedin attend a news conference in New York, U.S. on July 23, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer/File Photo
U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton talks to staff members, including aide Huma Abedin (L), onboard her campaign plane in White Plains, New York, U.S. October 28, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Huma Abedin, aide to U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, looks on as Clinton makes a campaign stop to greet picketing Verizon workers who are out on strike in the Manhattan borough of New York April 13, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 15: Rory Tahari (L) and Huma Abedin attend the 'Crown Heights' New York premiere at Metrograph on August 15, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 15: Actor/producer Nnamdi Asomugha and Huma Abedin attend the 'Crown Heights' New York premiere at The Metrograph on August 15, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Gary Gershoff/WireImage)
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The commander in chief’s tweet also appeared to urge the Justice Department to “act” against former FBI Director James Comey. In July 2016, Comey decided to recommend no criminal charges against Clinton or her aides despite his conclusion that the former secretary of state was “extremely careless” in her handling of classified information.

Trump’s broadside against his own Justice Department comes amid the ongoing federal investigation into his campaign’s contacts with Russia. In an interview with the New York Times last week, Trump said repeatedly that there was no collusion between his campaign and the Kremlin, and expressed hope that special counselor Robert Mueller’s probe would treat him fairly.

Last month, former national security adviser Michael Flynn pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI about his contacts with Russian officials — and is cooperating with Mueller’s probe. A Trump campaign aide with a foreign policy portfolio, George Papadopoulos, also pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI and is similarly cooperating. Paul Manafort, who served as Trump’s campaign manager, and one of Manafort’s deputies have also been charged with various crimes, including money laundering, as a result of Mueller’s probe.

The president’s lawyers have assured him that the investigation will be wrapped up early this year, but as Yahoo News Chief Investigative Correspondent Michael Isikoff reported last month, sources familiar with the probe say that such a rapid conclusion is “fanciful.”

Those sources told Isikoff that Mueller and his team are “pursuing new leads, interrogating new witnesses and collecting a mountain of new evidence” — including subpoenaed bank records and thousands of emails from the campaign and the Trump transition.

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