Israeli archaeologists find 2,700-year-old "governor of Jerusalem" seal impression

JERUSALEM, Jan 1 (Reuters) - Israeli archaeologists unveiled on Monday a 2,700-year-old clay seal impression which they said belonged to a biblical governor of Jerusalem.

The artifact, inscribed in an ancient Hebrew script as "belonging to the governor of the city," was likely attached to a shipment or sent as a souvenir on behalf of the governor, the most prominent local position held in Jerusalem at the time, the Israel Antiquities Authority said.

The impression, the size of a small coin, depicts two standing men, facing each other in a mirror-like manner and wearing striped garments reaching down to their knees. It was unearthed near the plaza of Judaism's Western Wall in the Old City of Jerusalem.

Related: Take a closer look at the seal

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Israel's 2700-year-old seal
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Israel's 2700-year-old seal
A conservator shows a 2,700-year-old clay seal impression which archaeologists from the Israel Antiquities Authority say belonged to a biblical governor of Jerusalem and was unearthed in excavations in the Western Wall plaza in Jerusalem's Old City January 1, 2018. REUTERS/Nir Elias
A conservator shows a 2,700-year-old clay seal impression which archaeologists from the Israel Antiquities Authority say belonged to a biblical governor of Jerusalem and was unearthed in excavations in the Western Wall plaza in Jerusalem's Old City January 1, 2018. REUTERS/Nir Elias
A conservator shows a 2,700-year-old clay seal impression which archaeologists from the Israel Antiquities Authority say belonged to a biblical governor of Jerusalem and was unearthed in excavations in the Western Wall plaza in Jerusalem's Old City January 1, 2018. REUTERS/Nir Elias
A 2,700-year-old clay seal impression which archaeologists from the Israel Antiquities Authority say belonged to a biblical governor of Jerusalem and was unearthed in excavations in the Western Wall plaza in Jerusalem's Old City January 1, 2018. REUTERS/Nir Elias
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"It supports the Biblical rendering of the existence of a governor of the city in Jerusalem 2,700 years ago," an Antiquities Authority statement quoted excavator Shlomit Weksler-Bdolah as saying.

Governors of Jerusalem, appointed by the king, are mentioned twice in the Bible, in 2 Kings, which refers to Joshua holding the position, and in 2 Chronicles, which mentions Masseiah in the post during the reign of Josiah.

The Antiquities Authority's announcement came several weeks after U.S. President Donald Trump recognized Jerusalem as Israel's capital, a decision that overturned a decades-old policy on the status of the city and stirred Palestinian protests and international concern. (Writing by Jeffrey Heller; Editing by Adrian Croft)

Related: Protests against Trump's recognition of the capital

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Arabs, Muslims protest Trump's Jerusalem decision
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Arabs, Muslims protest Trump's Jerusalem decision
Demonstrators pray during a protest against U.S. President Donald Trump's decision that the United States recognizes Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, near the U.S. Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey, December 6, 2017. REUTERS/Osman Orsal TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Palestinians react during a protest against U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to recognise Jerusalem as Israel's capital, in Khan Younis in the southern Gaza Strip December 6, 2017. REUTERS/Ibraheem Abu Mustafa
Palestinian demonstrators burn posters of the US president in Bethlehem's Manger Square in protest to him declaring Jerusalem as Israel's capital on December 6, 2017. Abbas said the United States can no longer play the role of peace broker after Donald Trump's decision on Wednesday to recognise Jerusalem as Israel's capital. / AFP PHOTO / Musa AL SHAER (Photo credit should read MUSA AL SHAER/AFP/Getty Images)
A Palestinian refugee family watches a televised broadcast of U.S. President Donald Trump delivering an address where he is expected to announce that the United States recognises Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, at Al-Baqaa Palestinian refugee camp, near Amman, Jordan December 6, 2017. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed
Palestinian refugee family watches a televised broadcast of U.S. President Donald Trump delivering an address where he is expected to announce that the United States recognises Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, at Al-Baqaa Palestinian refugee camp, near Amman, Jordan December 6, 2017. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed
Palestinian refugee family watches a televised broadcast of U.S. President Donald Trump delivering an address where he is expected to announce that the United States recognises Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, at Al-Baqaa Palestinian refugee camp, near Amman, Jordan December 6, 2017. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed
A Palestinian refugee watches a televised broadcast of U.S. President Donald Trump delivering an address where he is expected to announce that the United States recognises Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, at Al-Baqaa Palestinian refugee camp, near Amman, Jordan December 6, 2017. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed
A Palestinian refugee family watches a televised broadcast of U.S. President Donald Trump delivering an address where he is expected to announce that the United States recognises Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, at Al-Baqaa Palestinian refugee camp, near Amman, Jordan December 6, 2017. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed
U.S. President Donald Trump and ?Vice President Mike Pence? arrive for Trump to deliver remarks recognizing Jerusalem as the capital of Israel at the White House in Washington, U.S. December 6, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Palestinians react during a protest against U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to recognise Jerusalem as Israel's capital, in Khan Younis in the southern Gaza Strip December 6, 2017. REUTERS/Ibraheem Abu Mustafa
Palestinians react during a protest against U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to recognise Jerusalem as Israel's capital, in Khan Younis in the southern Gaza Strip December 6, 2017. REUTERS/Ibraheem Abu Mustafa
Palestinians react during a protest against U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to recognise Jerusalem as Israel's capital, in Khan Younis in the southern Gaza Strip December 6, 2017. REUTERS/Ibraheem Abu Mustafa TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Palestinians prepare to burn a representation of an Israeli flag during a protest against U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to recognise Jerusalem as Israel's capital, in Khan Younis in the southern Gaza Strip December 6, 2017. REUTERS/Ibraheem Abu Mustafa
Hamas supporters stage a protest against the possible U.S. decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital, in Gaza City , Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017. President Donald Trump is forging ahead with plans to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital despite intense Arab, Muslim and European opposition to a move that would upend decades of U.S. policy and risk potentially violent protests. (Photo by Ezz al-Zanoun/NurPhoto(
Hamas Chief Ismail Haniyeh during a protest against the possible U.S. decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital, in Gaza City , Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017. President Donald Trump is forging ahead with plans to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital despite intense Arab, Muslim and European opposition to a move that would upend decades of U.S. policy and risk potentially violent protests. (Photo by Ezz al-Zanoun/NurPhoto(
Hamas supporters stage a protest against the possible U.S. decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital, in Gaza City , Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017. President Donald Trump is forging ahead with plans to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital despite intense Arab, Muslim and European opposition to a move that would upend decades of U.S. policy and risk potentially violent protests. (Photo by Ezz al-Zanoun/NurPhoto(
Hamas Chief Ismail Haniyeh during a protest against the possible U.S. decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital, in Gaza City , Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017. President Donald Trump is forging ahead with plans to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital despite intense Arab, Muslim and European opposition to a move that would upend decades of U.S. policy and risk potentially violent protests. (Photo by Ezz al-Zanoun/NurPhoto(
A woman holds a sign during a demonstration against the US and Israel at Fatih Mosque in Istanbul on December 6, 2017. Hundreds of people staged protests in Istanbul angrily denouncing the US president's move to recognise Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. / AFP PHOTO / YASIN AKGUL (Photo credit should read YASIN AKGUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Palestinian demonstrators stand on posters of the US president in Bethlehem's Manger Square in protest to him declaring Jerusalem as Israel's capital on December 6, 2017. Abbas said the United States can no longer play the role of peace broker after Donald Trump's decision on Wednesday to recognise Jerusalem as Israel's capital. / AFP PHOTO / Musa AL SHAER (Photo credit should read MUSA AL SHAER/AFP/Getty Images)
Palestinian demonstrators burn posters of the US president in Bethlehem's Manger Square in protest to him declaring Jerusalem as Israel's capital on December 6, 2017. Abbas said the United States can no longer play the role of peace broker after Donald Trump's decision on Wednesday to recognise Jerusalem as Israel's capital. / AFP PHOTO / Musa AL SHAER (Photo credit should read MUSA AL SHAER/AFP/Getty Images)
Protesters wave Palestinian flags and chant slogans during a demonstration against the US and Israel in front of the US consulate in Istanbul on December 6, 2017. Hundreds of people staged a protest outside the US consulate in Istanbul angrily denouncing the US president's move to recognise Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. Around 1,500 people gathered outside the well-protected compound close to the Bosphorus which was sealed off by police with barricades, an AFP correspondent said. / AFP PHOTO / OZAN KOSE (Photo credit should read OZAN KOSE/AFP/Getty Images)
ISTANBUL, TURKEY - DECEMBER 06: Protesters wave flags and shout slogans outside the U.S. Consulate on December 6, 2017 in Istanbul, Turkey. People gathered to protest after U.S President Donald Trump declared recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. President Trump went ahead with the announcement despite warnings from Middle East leaders and the Pope condemning the decision. The announcement which breaks decades of U.S. policy threatens to bring further instability to the region. (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)
ISTANBUL, TURKEY - DECEMBER 06: Protesters wave flags and shout slogans outside the U.S. Consulate on December 6, 2017 in Istanbul, Turkey. People gathered to protest after U.S President Donald Trump declared recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. President Trump went ahead with the announcement despite warnings from Middle East leaders and the Pope condemning the decision. The announcement which breaks decades of U.S. policy threatens to bring further instability to the region. (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)
ISTANBUL, TURKEY - DECEMBER 06: Protesters wave flags and shout slogans outside the U.S. Consulate on December 6, 2017 in Istanbul, Turkey. People gathered to protest after U.S President Donald Trump declared recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. President Trump went ahead with the announcement despite warnings from Middle East leaders and the Pope condemning the decision. The announcement which breaks decades of U.S. policy threatens to bring further instability to the region. (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)
ISTANBUL, TURKEY - DECEMBER 06: Protesters wave flags and shout slogans outside the U.S. Consulate on December 6, 2017 in Istanbul, Turkey. People gathered to protest after U.S President Donald Trump declared recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. President Trump went ahead with the announcement despite warnings from Middle East leaders and the Pope condemning the decision. The announcement which breaks decades of U.S. policy threatens to bring further instability to the region. (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)
ISTANBUL, TURKEY - DECEMBER 06: Protesters wave flags and shout slogans outside the U.S. Consulate on December 6, 2017 in Istanbul, Turkey. People gathered to protest after U.S President Donald Trump declared recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. President Trump went ahead with the announcement despite warnings from Middle East leaders and the Pope condemning the decision. The announcement which breaks decades of U.S. policy threatens to bring further instability to the region. (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)
GAZA CITY, GAZA - DECEMBER 6: Head of the Political Bureau of Hamas, Ismail Haniyeh (4th L) attends a protest against US President Donald Trumps recognition of Jerusalem as Israels capital, in Gaza City, Gaza on December 6, 2017. (Photo by Ali Jadallah/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
GAZA CITY, GAZA - DECEMBER 6: Head of the Political Bureau of Hamas, Ismail Haniyeh attends a protest against US President Donald Trumps recognition of Jerusalem as Israels capital, in Gaza City, Gaza on December 6, 2017. (Photo by Ali Jadallah/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Protesters chant slogans and hold a poster with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Egypt's former president Mohamed Morsi and placards reading 'There is no you or me, there is Jerusalem- Killer Israel get out of Palestine' during a demonstration against the US and Israel at Fatih Mosque in Istanbul on December 6, 2017. Hundreds of people staged protests in Istanbul angrily denouncing the US president's move to recognise Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. / AFP PHOTO / YASIN AKGUL (Photo credit should read YASIN AKGUL/AFP/Getty Images)
A protester burns an Israeli flag printed on a piece of paper during a demonstration against the US and Israel in front of the US consulate in Istanbul on December 6, 2017. Hundreds of people staged a protest outside the US consulate in Istanbul angrily denouncing the US president's move to recognise Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. Around 1,500 people gathered outside the well-protected compound close to the Bosphorus which was sealed off by police with barricades, an AFP correspondent said. / AFP PHOTO / OZAN KOSE (Photo credit should read OZAN KOSE/AFP/Getty Images)
Protesters chant slogans and raise their fingers during a demonstration against the US and Israel in front of the US consulate in Istanbul on December 6, 2017. Hundreds of people staged a protest outside the US consulate in Istanbul angrily denouncing the US president's move to recognise Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. Around 1,500 people gathered outside the well-protected compound close to the Bosphorus which was sealed off by police with barricades, an AFP correspondent said. / AFP PHOTO / OZAN KOSE (Photo credit should read OZAN KOSE/AFP/Getty Images)
A protester wearing a niqab waves a flag during a demonstration against the US and Israel in front of the US consulate in Istanbul on December 6, 2017. Hundreds of people staged a protest outside the US consulate in Istanbul angrily denouncing the US president's move to recognise Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. Around 1,500 people gathered outside the well-protected compound close to the Bosphorus which was sealed off by police with barricades, an AFP correspondent said. / AFP PHOTO / OZAN KOSE (Photo credit should read OZAN KOSE/AFP/Getty Images)
ISTANBUL, TURKEY - DECEMBER 06: Protesters wave flags and shout slogans outside the U.S. Consulate on December 6, 2017 in Istanbul, Turkey. People gathered to protest after U.S President Donald Trump declared recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. President Trump went ahead with the announcement despite warnings from Middle East leaders and the Pope condemning the decision. The announcement which breaks decades of U.S. policy threatens to bring further instability to the region. (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)
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