Trump says there was no collusion, but even if there was it’s ‘not a crime’

President Trump told the New York Times on Thursday that there was no collusion between his campaign team and Russia, but said that even if there was, it is not a crime.

That information was reportedly gleaned by watching well-known lawyer Alan Dershowitz.

Trump recalled Dershowitz mention “the other day” that “No. 1, there is no collusion, No. 2, collusion is not a crime, but even if it was a crime, there was no collusion.”

“And he said that very strongly. He said there was no collusion,” the president further commented. “And he has studied this thing very closely. I’ve seen him a number of times.”

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Protester throws Russian flags at President Donald Trump
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Protester throws Russian flags at President Donald Trump
U.S. President Donald Trump gestures to reporters as Russian flags thrown from a protester fall in front of the president and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) as they arrive for the Republican policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., October 24, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. President Donald Trump gestures to reporters as miniature Russian flags thrown from a protester fall in front of the president as he arrives for the Republican policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., October 24, 2017.
Protester Ryan Clayton shouts at U.S. President Donald Trump (Not Pictured) as he is taken into custody after disrupting Trump's arrival for the Republican policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., October 24, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Protester Ryan Clayton is taken into custody after disrupting U.S. President Donald Trump's arrival for the Republican policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., October 24, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 24: Senate Majority Leader, Mitch McConnell (R-KY) walks with President Donald Trump to the Senate Republican Policy Luncheon as a protester throws Russian flags at Capitol Hill on Tuesday October 24, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
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Setting the collusion issue aside, there is precedent in trying people for obstruction of justice, notes The Hill.

What specific potential offenses special counsel Robert Mueller is looking into remains largely unknown, but he has already obtained two guilty pleas.

The Washington Post reports that former national security adviser Michael Flynn and former Trump campaign worker George Papadopoulos have pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI. 

Meanwhile, Paul Manafort, who served as Trump’s campaign chairman for a time, and his associate Rick Gates have been indicted on numerous counts.

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