US cities sue military over gun background-check system

(Reuters) - The cities of New York, San Francisco and Philadelphia have sued the U.S. Department of Defense to make it fix its system for reporting conviction records to a database used for background checks on gun buyers.

The lawsuit was filed on Friday in federal court in Alexandria, Virginia and came after the U.S. Air Force revealed it failed to report the criminal record of the man who in November killed 26 people and wounded 20 others in a shooting at a Texas church.

The complaint, announced on Tuesday, said it sought an injunction to prevent future "senseless carnage" by requiring the Defense Department to locate all records in its possession that should be reported in order to fix "deadly gaps" in the background check database.

25 PHOTOS
States with the toughest gun laws
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States with the toughest gun laws

24. Indiana

Grade: D-

Source: gunlawscorecard.org

(Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)

T-23. North Carolina

Grade: D-

Source: gunlawscorecard.org

(Chuck Liddy/Raleigh News & Observer/MCT via Getty Images)

T-23. New Hampshire

Grade: D

Source: gunlawscorecard.org

(Photo credit should read DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)

T-21. Virginia

Grade: D

Source: gunlawscorecard.org

(Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

T-21. Ohio

Grade: D

Source: gunlawscorecard.org

(Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

20. Nebraska

Grade: D

Source: gunlawscorecard.org

(Photo via Getty Images)

19. Wisconsin

Grade: C-

Source: gunlawscorecard.org

(Photo by John Gress/Corbis via Getty Images)

18. Nevada

Grade: C-

Source: gunlawscorecard.org

(Photo via Getty Images)

T-16. Michigan

Grade: C

Source: gunlawscorecard.org

(Photo via Getty Images)

T-16. Iowa

Grade: C

Source: gunlawscorecard.org

(Photo by Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

15. Oregon

Grade: C

Source: gunlawscorecard.org

(Photo via REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson)

14. Colorado

Grade: C

Source: gunlawscorecard.org

(Photo via REUTERS/Rick Wilking/File Photo)

13. Pennsylvania

Grade: C

Source: gunlawscorecard.org

(Photo credit should read DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)

12. Minnesota

Grade: C+

Source: gunlawscorecard.org

(Photo via AOL)

11. Delaware

Grade: B

Source: gunlawscorecard.org

(Photo via Getty Images)

10. Washington

Grade: B

Source: gunlawscorecard.org

(Photo via Getty Images)

9. Rhode Island

Grade: B+

Source: gunlawscorecard.org

(Photo by Kenneth C. Zirkel via Getty Images)

8. Illinois

Grade: B+

Source: gunlawscorecard.org

(Photo via REUTERS/Jim Young)

7. Hawaii

Grade: A-

Source: gunlawscorecard.org

(Photo via Getty Images)

T-5. New York

Grade: A-

Source: gunlawscorecard.org

(Photo via REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton)

T-5. Maryland

Grade: A-

Source: gunlawscorecard.org

(Photo credit BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

4. Massachusetts

Grade: A-

Source: gunlawscorecard.org

(Photo via Getty Images)

3. New Jersey

Grade: A-

Source: gunlawscorecard.org

(Photo by Mark Makela for The Washington Post via Getty Images)

2. Connecticut

Grade: A-

Source: gunlawscorecard.org

(Photo via Getty Images)

1. California

Grade: A

Source: gunlawscorecard.org

(Photo credit MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)

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"New York City is joining Philadelphia and San Francisco to stand up to the Department of Defense and demand they comply with the law and repair their drastically flawed system," New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said in a statement.

The three cities are led by Democrats, some of whom have advocated stricter gun controls.

The Defense Department said that it did not comment on pending litigation.

Former Airman Devin Kelley - who opened fire in the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, on Nov. 5 - was convicted five years ago by a general court-martial on two charges of domestic assault against his wife and stepson.

The Air Force said that information was not entered into the National Criminal Information Center database, which the Federal Bureau of Investigation oversees and uses to run required background check requests from gun dealers before a sale.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions has since ordered the Justice Department to undertake a review of the system to help plug potential reporting gaps.

The Department of Defense Inspector General earlier this month released a report that found that all military services "consistently" failed to submit fingerprint data for 24 percent of the convicted offenders reviewed.

9 PHOTOS
9 foods that are harder to buy than a gun
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9 foods that are harder to buy than a gun

The cronut, or croissant doughnut, was first created by pastry wizard Dominique Ansel in New York City in 2013. And ever since then people have been waiting in line for hours to get their hands on one. Besides purchasing a cronut on the black market, the only way taste the sweet pastry is to stand in line, rain or shine. Some eager customers have waited out by the bakery as 5:30 in the morning to be a first customer in line when the doors opens at 8 a.m. 

You don't have to wait in line to purchase a gun. As Mic previously reported, certain states don't require a license or a permit to purchase a firearm. Many states implement rules that would allow virtually anyone to purchase a gun and still have enough time to wait in a cronut line.

Source: Tri Vo/Mic

Beloved Pappy Van Winkle whiskey is extremely hard to acquire. Approximately 7,000 bottles of the booze are released each fall, Fortune reported. To get a swig or two, you'd have to know the right people and be willing to spend hundreds of dollars on a single bottle of the liquor. 

By contrast, there is an abundant supply of guns in the United States. In 2013 alone, U.S. gunmakers produced nearly 11 million guns, according to the the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and explosives. The year before that, manufacturers made nearly 9 million guns, according to a graph published by NPR.

Source: Tri Vo/Mic

To get a martini — one of the most basic cocktails in the book — customers at any law-abiding bar in the country have to show a government approved form of identification to prove that they are at least 21 years of age. Anyone younger will technically be denied (unless they live in one of these states). 

Conversely, it's possible to own a rifle or a shotgun as a child in 30 states, the Washington Postnoted. While a thirteen year old cannot lawfully purchase a gun on their own, their parent can ostensibly purchase one and gift it to them, for their birthday, Christmas or just as a special treat. 

Source: Tri Vo/Mic

While you can't technically eat food stamps, they are the means by which 46.5 million Americansget access to food, and the process of registering for the federal aid program takes 30 days on average, according to the Daily Beast.

To get a gun in many states, a simple background check that can happen in a matter of minutes will do, the publication added. 

Source: Tri Vo/Mic

It's legal in only 13 states to sell raw milk in stores. In other states, the dairy product must undergo the pasteurization process before it can be sold.

Guns, on the other hand, are legal in each and every state, and aren't required to undergo any specific process before they are sold. 

Source: Tri Vo/Mic

These cherished cookies sold by Girl Scouts are not available in store or online and can only be purchased six to eight weeks out of the year, according to the official website. The season during which they are available depends on when individual local troops sell the cookies, but the only way to pick up a pack is by ordering through a troop member.

Guns are available not only year around, but at most hours of the day, every day of the week. And buying one doesn't require tracking down a 12-year-old to place an order. GunTV even makes it possible for night owls to shop for firearms while the sun rises.

Source: Tri Vo/Mic

1938 law banned thee delightful chocolaty Kinder Surprise Eggs from being sold in the states, and it is illegal to sell or buy them on U.S. soil. The treat features a plastic package in the middle that holds a toy and the government is worried that it is a choking hazard for young children,BuzzFeed reported.

There have been at least seven reported deaths due to choking on this product since 1989. By comparison, an average of seven U.S. children or teens are killed by guns — which are not banned in the states — every day in America, the Everytown For Gun Safety Support Fund noted. 

Source: Tri Vo/Mic

 The Scottish delicacy haggis, which is made from a sheep stomach or lung, stuffed with diced sheep liver, heart and more lung, as well as oatmeal and onion and seasonings, is technically illegal in the U.S. The United States Department of Agriculture banned any foods containing lungs out of concerns over food safety in 1971, BuzzFeed noted. So to get any properly, legally made haggis, interested parties must travel to Scotland.

A gun can be purchased online from the comfort of your very own bed, the Washington Post wrote. 

Source: Tri Vo/Mic

The sale and farming of the popular seafood option is now heavily regulated by the American government because of overfishing. Only certified Chilean sea bass fishing boats can harvest and sell the fish, HG.org noted

Pretty much anyone can sell a gun. The online gun marketplace makes it especially easy to sell guns on the internet, said the Washington Post

Source: Tri Vo/Mic

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(Reporting by Nate Raymond in Boston; Editing by Andrew Hay)

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