'Neo-Nazi' teen charged with killing girlfriend's parents after they reported him


A 17-year-old Virginia teen was charged with two counts of murder Saturday after he allegedly murdered his girlfriend’s parents. 

Scott Fricker, 48, and his wife Buckley Kuhn-Fricker, 43, were shot and killed in their home in Reston, Virginia, on Friday according to Fairfax County police. The teenager, who is not named due to his minor status, shot the Frickers after getting into their home. Police indicate that the teen also suffered from a self-inflicted gunshot wound and is currently in critical condition. 

The teen was dating the Frickers’ teenage daughter, but the parents pushed the young couple to break up. Kuhn-Fricker’s mother, Janet Kuhn, told ABC 7 that her daughter tried to separate the teens because they considered the boy to be dangerous and a white supremacist.

“They kept a tight eye on her and they disapproved of all the time she was spending with him, hours on the phone,” Kuhn told ABC.

Kuhn-Fricker alerted the principal of the teen’s high school to concerning social media posts from the boy and called him an “outspoken Neo-Nazi” in messages to friends, the Washington Post reports. She flagged social media posts where the boy lauded Hitler, supported Nazi book burnings and called for a “white revolution,” according to the Post. 

“I would feel a little bad reporting him if his online access was to basically be a normal teen, but he is a monster, and I have no pity for people like that,” Kuhn-Fricker wrote in an email obtained by the Post. “He made these choices. He is spreading hate.”

After staging an intervention, the family believed their daughter had come to the realization that a breakup was in her best interest. But around 5 a.m. on Friday morning, Kuhn-Fricker and Fricker heard a noise and discovered the teenage boy in their daughter’s bedroom. The teen shot and killed the parents before inflicting a wound on himself, but none of the other four family members in the house were injured. 

The unnamed teen is under police guard and will be served his warrants depending on his medical condition, police say. 

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A member of the Ku Klux Klan gestures as he marches during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. A Ku Klux Klan chapter and an African-American group planned overlapping demonstrations on Saturday outside the South Carolina State House, where state officials removed the Confederate battle flag last week. REUTERS/Chris Keane
A member of a white supremacy group gives the fascist salute during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES) REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A member of a white supremacy group shouts during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A member of a white supremacy group stands behind a flag with a swastika during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A member of the Ku Klux Klan who says his name is Gary Munker poses for a photo during an interview with AFP in Hampton Bays, New York on November 22, 2016. Munker says his local branch of the KKK, which has recently placed recruitment flyers on car windshields on Long Island, has seen around 1,000 enquiries from people interested in joining since the election of Donald Trump. / AFP / William EDWARDS (Photo credit should read WILLIAM EDWARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
Members of a white supremacy group give the fascist salute during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A supporter of the Ku Klux Klan is seen with his tattoos during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Keane
A member of the Ku Klux Klan gestures as he listens to the crowd while carrying a Confederate flag during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Keane
A member of the Ku Klux Klan yells during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. A Ku Klux Klan chapter and an African-American group planned overlapping demonstrations on Saturday outside the South Carolina State House, where state officials removed the Confederate battle flag last week.REUTERS/Chris Keane
Members of the Ku Klux Klan yell as they fly Confederate flags during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. A Ku Klux Klan chapter and an African-American group planned overlapping demonstrations on Saturday outside the South Carolina State House, where state officials removed the Confederate battle flag last week. REUTERS/Chris Keane? TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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  • This article originally appeared on HuffPost.
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