Guatemala to move embassy to Jerusalem, backing Trump

GUATEMALA CITY (Reuters) - Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales said on Sunday he had given instructions to move the Central American country's embassy in Israel to Jerusalem, a few days after his government backed the United States in a row over the city's status.

In a short post on his official Facebook account, Morales said he decided to move the embassy from Tel Aviv after talking to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Sunday.

This month U.S. President Donald Trump recognized Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, reversing decades of U.S. policy and upsetting the Arab world and Western allies. 

RELATED: Check out the latest, and largest, U.S. embassy in London: 

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Inside the new United States embassy in London
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Inside the new United States embassy in London

The new United States embassy building is seen during a press preview near the River Thames in London, Britain December 13, 2017.

REUTERS/Stefan Rousseau/Pool

The consular and visa section at the new United States embassy building is seen during a press preview near the River Thames in London, Britain December 13, 2017.

REUTERS/Stefan Rousseau/Pool

The logo and seal of the Department of the Treasury is seen inside the new United States embassy building is seen during a press preview near the River Thames in London, Britain December 13, 2017.

REUTERS/Alastair Grant/Pool

A bar is seen inside the new United States embassy building near the River Thames in London, Britain December 13, 2017.

REUTERS/Alistair Grant/Pool

A general view of a corridor in the Consular section with a photograph of the Winfield House garden, the official residence of the United States ambassador to the UK is seen at the new United States embassy building is seen during a press preview near the River Thames in London, Britain December 13, 2017.

REUTERS/Alastair Grant/Pool

The view from the new United States embassy building is seen during a press preview near the River Thames in London, Britain December 13, 2017.

REUTERS/Stefan Rousseau/Pool

Boxes sits on desks in the consular section inside the new United States embassy building near the River Thames in London, Britain December 13, 2017.

REUTERS/Alistair Grant/Pool

The consular lobby with a sculpture by British artist Rachel Whiteread, which depicts the typical home in 1950's America is seen inside the new United States embassy building is seen during a press preview near the River Thames in London, Britain December 13, 2017.

REUTERS/Stefan Rousseau/Pool

The consular and visa section at the new United States embassy building is seen during a press preview near the River Thames in London, Britain December 13, 2017.

REUTERS/Alastair Grant/Pool

The consular and visa section at the new United States embassy building is seen during a press preview near the River Thames in London, Britain December 13, 2017.

REUTERS/Alastair Grant/Pool

The consular lobby with a sculpture by British artist Rachel Whiteread, which depicts the typical home in 1950's America is seen inside the new United States embassy building is seen during a press preview near the River Thames in London, Britain December 13, 2017.

REUTERS/Alastair Grant/Pool

The new United States embassy building is seen during a press preview near the River Thames in London, Britain December 13, 2017.

REUTERS/Stefan Rousseau/Pool

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On Thursday, 128 countries defied Trump by backing a non-binding U.N. General Assembly resolution calling for the United States to drop its recognition of Jerusalem.

Guatemala was one of only a handful of countries to join the United States and Israel in voting against the resolution.

The United States is an important source of assistance to Guatemala, and Trump had threatened to cut off financial aid to countries that voted in favor of the U.N. resolution.

(Reporting by Bill Barreto; Editing by Susan Thomas)

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