Climbing Mount Everest is cool, but it can also make you temporarily insane

While climbing Mount Everest can be one of the coolest things you do in your life, it can apparently also make you go completely insane. 

Published in the journal Psychological Medicine, researchers found that mountaineers traveling at extreme altitudes can experience psychosis, with symptoms including hallucinations and delusions.  

In 2008, one climber reported hiking the Himalayas all day with a hallucinated man named Jimmy who spoke words of encouragement to him and then vanished, according to Fox News. 

11 PHOTOS
Striking photos of Mount Everest expeditions
See Gallery
Striking photos of Mount Everest expeditions
(GERMANY OUT) Mount Everest Massiv, Flug von Lhasanach KathmanduLuftaufnahme- 1996 (Photo by Mei�er/ullstein bild via Getty Images)
L.de la FERRIERE TRIES TO CLIMB EVEREST WITHOUT OXYGEN (Photo by John van Hasselt/Sygma via Getty Images)
L.de la FERRIERE TRIES TO CLIMB EVEREST WITHOUT OXYGEN (Photo by John van Hasselt/Sygma via Getty Images)
NEPAL - UNSPECIFIED DATE: Pierre Mazeaud during the ascent of Mount Everest, he is the first Frenchman to have climbed Mount Everest, in 1978 in Nepal. (Photo by EVEREST 78/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)
Some alpinists of the expedition organized to reach the top of the Mount Everest walking on the glaciers. Nepal, 1953. (Photo by Mondadori Portfolio via Getty Images)
Two alpinists roped together on the Mount Everest. Nepal, 1953. (Photo by Mondadori Portfolio via Getty Images)
A climber jumps a crevasse on Mount Everest. (Photo by Galen Rowell/Corbis via Getty Images)
A climber ascends an icy slope on Mount Everest. (Photo by Galen Rowell/Corbis via Getty Images)
EVEREST HIMALAYAN RANGE, NEPAL - MAY: Climbers on Mount Everest in Nepal. (Photo by Tap RICHARDS/Mallory-Irvine/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)
Ice formations just above the Walking with the Wounded team's Everest base camp in Nepal.
Captain Francis Atkinson, a member of the Walking with the Wounded team, climbs out of Khumjung on the way to summit Everest in Nepal.
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

This new degree of altitude sickness dubbed “isolated high-altitude psychosis” may be its own medical condition. 

However researchers aren’t really sure what actually causes it and say it may be just as much a result of climbing alone as it could be related to high altitudes.

The symptoms occur once mountaineers reach heights greater than 22,965 feet but seemingly disappear completely once they get out of that danger zone. 

The research could help further advancement on temporary psychosis in general. 

Read Full Story