Trump reportedly confident Russia probe will soon result in his exoneration

President Trump is reportedly confident that the Russia probe being conducted by special counsel Robert Mueller will soon result in his exoneration.

According to CNN, sources have described the president as being in a more positive state of mind regarding the matter. 

Some have also noted that he is under the belief that he will be given a letter that clears him of wrongdoing.

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Russia-linked ads shared on social media during 2016 election
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Russia-linked ads shared on social media during 2016 election
This graphic of Jesus and Hillary Clinton is an actual post shared by the Russian page “Army of Jesus,” released du… https://t.co/08ObFsWnkG
this Russian-bought ad presented without comment (except to say it's a Russian-bought ad) https://t.co/X4Atha4fil
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That is reportedly the impression Trump has been given by his legal team, and many in the White House are said to be fearful of what will happen if that does not come to pass. 

As Trump’s tensions about the investigation are allegedly relaxing, the anxieties of many appear to be moving in the opposite direction. 

A number of the president’s allies have raised alarms about the appearance of political bias in the investigation, notes Business Insider.

The emergence of unfavorable Trump texts sent by an FBI agent formerly involved in the Mueller probe has prompted a flurry of allegations that the entire investigation is corrupt.

Some have also asserted that the federal law enforcement agency is nothing more than a “shadow government” and should be the subject of an official examination. 

Meanwhile, news that Mueller has obtained thousands of Trump transition team emails was met with the attorney for that group calling the acquisition “unlawful conduct.”

Peter Carr, a spokesperson for Mueller, has refuted that claim, saying, “When we have obtained emails in the course of our ongoing criminal investigation, we have secured either the account owner’s consent or appropriate criminal process.” 

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President Trump delivers remarks on the national security strategy
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President Trump delivers remarks on the national security strategy
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a national security strategy speech at the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Dec. 18, 2017. The national security strategy, a document mandated by Congress, will describe the Trump administration's approach to a range of global challenges including North Korea's nuclear program, international terrorism, Russian aggression and China's rising influence. Photographer: Jim Lo Scalzo/Pool via Bloomberg
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a national security strategy speech at the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Dec. 18, 2017. The national security strategy, a document mandated by Congress, will describe the Trump administration's approach to a range of global challenges including North Korea's nuclear program, international terrorism, Russian aggression and China's rising influence. Photographer: Jim Lo Scalzo/Pool via Bloomberg
U.S. President Donald Trump pauses while speaking during a national security strategy speech at the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Dec. 18, 2017. The national security strategy, a document mandated by Congress, will describe the Trump administration's approach to a range of global challenges including North Korea's nuclear program, international terrorism, Russian aggression and China's rising influence. Photographer: Jim Lo Scalzo/Pool via Bloomberg
Ben Carson, U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, center, speaks with attendees before a national security strategy speech by U.S. President Donald Trump, not pictured, at the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Dec. 18, 2017. The national security strategy, a document mandated by Congress, will describe the Trump administration's approach to a range of global challenges including North Korea's nuclear program, international terrorism, Russian aggression and China's rising influence. Photographer: Zach Gibson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
U.S. President Donald Trump waves after speaking during a national security strategy speech at the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Dec. 18, 2017. The national security strategy, a document mandated by Congress, will describe the Trump administration's approach to a range of global challenges including North Korea's nuclear program, international terrorism, Russian aggression and China's rising influence. Photographer: Zach Gibson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Jared Kushner, senior White House adviser, arrives before a national security strategy speech by U.S. President Donald Trump, not pictured, at the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Dec. 18, 2017. The national security strategy, a document mandated by Congress, will describe the Trump administration's approach to a range of global challenges including North Korea's nuclear program, international terrorism, Russian aggression and China's rising influence. Photographer: Zach Gibson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Scott Pruitt, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, center, speaks with attendees before a national security strategy speech by U.S. President Donald Trump, not pictured, at the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Dec. 18, 2017. The national security strategy, a document mandated by Congress, will describe the Trump administration's approach to a range of global challenges including North Korea's nuclear program, international terrorism, Russian aggression and China's rising influence. Photographer: Zach Gibson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
U.S. Vice President Mike Pence speaks during a national security strategy speech at the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Dec. 18, 2017. The national security strategy, a document mandated by Congress, will describe the Trump administration's approach to a range of global challenges including North Korea's nuclear program, international terrorism, Russian aggression and China's rising influence. Photographer: Zach Gibson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
White House senior advisor Jared Kushner (C) chats with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (L) and Senator John Cornyn (R) as he arrives for a speech by US President Donald Trump at the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, DC on December 18, 2017. President Donald Trump rolled out his first 'National Security Strategy', a combative document designed to put meat on the bones of his 'America First' sloganeering. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Members of the military and national security staffs attend a speech by US President Donald Trump about his administration's National Security Strategy at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center in Washington, DC, December 18, 2017. President Donald Trump rolled out his first 'National Security Strategy', a combative document designed to put meat on the bones of his 'America First' sloganeering. / AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 18: U.S. President Donald Trump is introduced before delivering a speech at the Ronald Reagan Building December 18, 2017 in Washington, DC. The president was expected to outline a new strategy for U.S. foreign policy through the release of the periodic National Security Strategy, a document that aims to outline major national security concerns and the administration's plans to deal with them. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 18: U.S. President Donald Trump walks off the stage after delivering a speech at the Ronald Reagan Building December 18, 2017 in Washington, DC. The president was expected to outline a new strategy for U.S. foreign policy through the release of the periodic National Security Strategy, a document that aims to outline major national security concerns and the administration's plans to deal with them. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
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