Roy Moore refuses to concede day after losing to Democratic rival in Alabama Senate race

  • Roy Moore the Republican Alabama candidate who lost a Senate special election to a Democrat on Tuesday has not yet conceded.
  • Moore issued a video statement on Wednesday night saying he would wait for Alabama's secretary of state to certify the results.

Roy Moore released a YouTube video on Wednesday night refusing to concede the Alabama Senate election he lost to his Democratic rival Doug Jones one day earlier.

In the video, Moore insisted that the "the battle rages on," pointing to military ballots, among others, that have yet to be counted before the Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill officially certifies the results.

"In this race, we have not received the final count​ to include ​military and provisional ballots. This has been a very close race and we are awaiting certification by the secretary of state," Moore said Wednesday night.

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Roy Moore on Senate election day in Alabama
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Roy Moore on Senate election day in Alabama
Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Judge Roy Moore rides his horse after voting in Gallant, Alabama, U.S., December 12, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks to the media after he cast his ballot in Gallant, Alabama, U.S., December 12, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
"Make America Great Again" hats lie on a table at Republican U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore's election night party in Montgomery, Alabama, U.S. December 12, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks to the media after he cast his ballot in Gallant, Alabama, U.S., December 12, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
UNITED STATES - DECEMBER 11: Judge Roy Moore rides away on his horse after voting at the Gallant Volunteer Fire Department in Gallant, Ala., on Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
A saxophonist entertains the guests gathered for Republican U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore's election night party in Montgomery, Alabama, U.S. December 12, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
UNITED STATES - DECEMBER 11: Judge Roy Moore emerges to speak to the media after voting at the Gallant Volunteer Fire Department in Gallant, Ala., on Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
Supporters perform the Pledge of Allegiance at Republican U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore's election night party in Montgomery, Alabama, U.S. December 12, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Judge Roy Moore walks his horses after voting in Gallant, Alabama, U.S., December 12, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks to the media after he cast his ballot in Gallant, Alabama, U.S., December 12, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
UNITED STATES - DECEMBER 11: Judge Roy Moore ties his horse to a fence as he arrives to vote at the Gallant Volunteer Fire Department in Gallant, Ala., on Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
Roy Moore, Republican candidate for U.S. Senate from Alabama, arrives on horseback to a polling location in Gallant, Alabama, U.S., on Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017. Democrat Doug Jones and Moore made their election eve pitches to Alabama voters in settings that evoked the cultural and political divide that's come to define the two parties in modern America. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
MONTGOMERY, AL - DECEMBER 12: Mike Tate holds his son, Seth Tate, as he and his family await the arrival of Republican Senatorial candidate Roy Moore for his election night party in the RSA Activity Center on December 12, 2017 in Montgomery, Alabama. Mr. Moore is facing off against Democrat Doug Jones in the special election for the U.S. Senate. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Republican Senatorial candidate Roy Moore (L) and his wife Kayla ride their horses to the polling station to vote in Gallant, AL, on December 12, 2017. The state of Alabama holds a closely-watched special election for US Senate featuring Republican candidate Roy Moore, who is endorsed by President Donald Trump despite being accused of molesting teenaged girls. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Republican Senatorial candidate Roy Moore (C) departs on his horse, Sassy, at the polling station after voting in Gallant, AL, on December 12, 2017 The state of Alabama holds a closely-watched special election for US Senate featuring Republican candidate Roy Moore, who is endorsed by President Donald Trump despite being accused of molesting teenaged girls. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
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Twenty-fours earlier, Moore floated the possibility of a recount, but Secretary Merrill seemed to throw cold water on that, saying a recount was unlikely to change the outcome of the race, which ended with a 1.5% margin between Moore and Jones, with 100% of precincts reporting. At last count, Jones had earned 20,715 more votes than Moore.

"This particular race was watched not only by the people of this state, but by the entire nation, and many around the world," Moore said, adding that he believed the "heart and soul our country is at stake."

Moore went on to recite some of the key platforms of his campaign, and quoted heavily from Bible scripture. He did not explicitly say if, or when, he would concede. Jones said in a news conference earlier Wednesday that he had not received the traditional congratulatory phone call from Moore after Jones was projected the winner.

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SEE ALSO: Republicans will have only a one-seat majority in the Senate after Doug Jones' surprise victory in Alabama — here's what that means for 2018

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