Greek yogurt could be used to fuel jets

Greek Yogurt isn’t just good for your health. Turns out it may also help the environment! A new study published in Joule says Greek Yogurt creates food waste that could one day be used in jet-fuel.

The liquid whey that’s left behind can be transformed into bio-oil which could be used in biofuels or even as an additive in livestock feed.The bio-oil is made from caprioc and caprylic acid which is similar to the way bacteria in our bodies convert food into acid. 

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Gordon William shows discarded char powder at a charcoal depot in Dar es Salaam on March 10, 2015. ARTI Energy is a Tanzanian company providing clean energy products, produces charcoal briquettes produced entirely from biomass waste and discarded char powder. Not only good for the environment, it provides an economic benefit to locals who bring in char powder. The finished product is cheaper, less smoky, and burns hotter and longer than traditional charcoal. While using biomass, such as coconut shells and corn husks, for charcoal is not a new idea, community acceptance of a new product is difficult to achieve, says ARTI Energy Executive Director Potnis Nachiket. AFP PHOTO / Daniel Hayduk (Photo credit should read Daniel Hayduk/AFP/Getty Images)
A photo taken on March 10, 2015 shows charcoal at a depot in Dar es Salaam on March 10, 2015. ARTI Energy is a Tanzanian company providing clean energy products, produces charcoal briquettes produced entirely from biomass waste and discarded char powder. Not only good for the environment, it provides an economic benefit to locals who bring in char powder. The finished product is cheaper, less smoky, and burns hotter and longer than traditional charcoal. While using biomass, such as coconut shells and corn husks, for charcoal is not a new idea, community acceptance of a new product is difficult to achieve, says ARTI Energy Executive Director Potnis Nachiket. AFP PHOTO / Daniel Hayduk (Photo credit should read Daniel Hayduk/AFP/Getty Images)
Edgar Zacharia gathers char powder from a charcoal depot in Dar es Salaam on March 10, 2015. ARTI Energy is a Tanzanian company providing clean energy products, produces charcoal briquettes produced entirely from biomass waste and discarded char powder. Not only good for the environment, it provides an economic benefit to locals who bring in char powder. The finished product is cheaper, less smoky, and burns hotter and longer than traditional charcoal. While using biomass, such as coconut shells and corn husks, for charcoal is not a new idea, community acceptance of a new product is difficult to achieve, says ARTI Energy Executive Director Potnis Nachiket. AFP PHOTO / Daniel Hayduk (Photo credit should read Daniel Hayduk/AFP/Getty Images)
Men gather char powder from a charcoal depot in Dar es Salaam on March 10, 2015. ARTI Energy is a Tanzanian company providing clean energy products, produces charcoal briquettes produced entirely from biomass waste and discarded char powder. Not only good for the environment, it provides an economic benefit to locals who bring in char powder. The finished product is cheaper, less smoky, and burns hotter and longer than traditional charcoal. While using biomass, such as coconut shells and corn husks, for charcoal is not a new idea, community acceptance of a new product is difficult to achieve, says ARTI Energy Executive Director Potnis Nachiket. AFP PHOTO / Daniel Hayduk (Photo credit should read Daniel Hayduk/AFP/Getty Images)
Edgar Zacharia lifts a sack of char powder gathered at a charcoal depot in Dar es Salaam on March 10, 2015. ARTI Energy is a Tanzanian company providing clean energy products, produces charcoal briquettes produced entirely from biomass waste and discarded char powder. Not only good for the environment, it provides an economic benefit to locals who bring in char powder. The finished product is cheaper, less smoky, and burns hotter and longer than traditional charcoal. While using biomass, such as coconut shells and corn husks, for charcoal is not a new idea, community acceptance of a new product is difficult to achieve, says ARTI Energy Executive Director Potnis Nachiket. AFP PHOTO / Daniel Hayduk (Photo credit should read Daniel Hayduk/AFP/Getty Images)
Gordon William carries a sack of traditional charcoal at a charcoal depot in Dar es Salaam on March 10, 2015. ARTI Energy is a Tanzanian company providing clean energy products, produces charcoal briquettes produced entirely from biomass waste and discarded char powder. Not only good for the environment, it provides an economic benefit to locals who bring in char powder. The finished product is cheaper, less smoky, and burns hotter and longer than traditional charcoal. While using biomass, such as coconut shells and corn husks, for charcoal is not a new idea, community acceptance of a new product is difficult to achieve, says ARTI Energy Executive Director Potnis Nachiket. AFP PHOTO / Daniel Hayduk (Photo credit should read Daniel Hayduk/AFP/Getty Images)
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Experts believe the oil can eventually be refined into biofuels for jets. However, they say there is still a lot of work that needs to be done. For now, the acids in the bio-oil can be used as “green antimicrobials,” which could replace antibiotics in livestock.

Newsweek reports that the green antimicrobials could be key for the health of agricultural animals and preventing diseases from becoming resistant to drugs.

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