Clinton rape accuser Juanita Broaddrick explains why she supported Trump


A woman who accuses former President Bill Clinton of raping her during his 1978 campaign for Arkansas governor spoke out on Monday about her support for President Donald Trump. 

Juanita Broaddrick, who was a volunteer on Clinton's campaign when the alleged rape occurred, came out of relative obscurity last year during 2016 presidential campaign alongside Trump.

"Constantly asked about allegations against Pres. Trump. My reply "All allegations of sexual assault should be respectfully heard and given a fair assessment. I can only speak to my situation because I was there and lived it," Broaddrick wrote in a tweet on Monday. 

"Why did I support President Trump? I was raped by Bill Clinton & threatened by Hillary Clinton," she continued in a follow-up tweet. "I supported the one person who I believed had the chance of preventing my rapist and his enabler from being sent to the White House and back in the seat of power."

Her comments came hours after three different women who have accused Trump of misconduct spoke out during an interview with Megyn Kelly on Monday, revealing specific details of the ways in which he allegedly forced himself on or otherwise ogled the women in professional settings. 

“I just felt so gross,” one accused explained. "Just looking me over like I was a piece of meat.”

The recent flurry of sexual assault allegations have brought all claims and figures like Broaddrick's back into the spotlight, as figures from NBC News anchor Matt Lauer to Minnesota Senator Al Franken have been forced out of their jobs over allegations of sexual misconduct and harassment.

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Juanita Broaddrick speaks in the spin room after the the town hall debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Kathleen Willey and Juanita Broaddrick (L-R) sit at the presidential town hall debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Kathleen Willey, Juanita Broaddrick and Kathy Shelton (L-R) are seated at the second U.S. presidential debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
Juanita Broaddrick arrives for the second presidential debate between Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic contender Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri on October 9, 2016. / AFP / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Kathleen Willey arrives for the second presidential debate between Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic contender Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri on October 9, 2016. / AFP / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Kathy Shelton speaks in the spin room after the the town hall debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Kathy Shelton arrives for the second presidential debate between Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic contender Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri on October 9, 2016. / AFP / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Bill Clinton accuser Juanita Broaddrick (L) chats with rape victim Kathy Shelton as they take their seats for the second presidential debate between Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic contender Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri on October 9, 2016. / AFP / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Kathleen Willey, Juanita Broaddrick and Kathy Shelton (L-R) are seated at the start of the second U.S. presidential town hall debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
ST LOUIS, MO - OCTOBER 09: (L-R) Kathleen Willey, Juanita Broaddrick, Kathy Shelton, a guest, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's daughters-in-law Lara Trump and Vanessa Trump and daughter Tiffany Trump sit before the town hall debate at Washington University on October 9, 2016 in St Louis, Missouri. This is the second of three presidential debates scheduled prior to the November 8th election. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
ST LOUIS, MO - OCTOBER 09: (L-R) Kathleen Willey, Juanita Broaddrick and Kathy Shelton sit before the town hall debate at Washington University on October 9, 2016 in St Louis, Missouri. This is the second of three presidential debates scheduled prior to the November 8th election. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
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Broaddrick has also criticized TIME magazine for its coverage of the so-called "Silence Breakers," naming the alleged victims who've spoken out about sexual harassment and misconduct in the workplace as the "Person of the Year" for the impact they have had. 

According to Broaddrick, she was initially interviewed for TIME's coverage but did not see any of her quotes or contributions make the final coverage. 

"Time magazine asked to interview me re:  movement. The comments I gave were deemed of no value. I'd like to know why. Could it be I didn't fit in their liberal victim mold," she said in a tweet last week. 
 

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