A growing chorus of Democratic Senators are calling on Trump to resign over sexual misconduct allegations

  • Sen. Bernie Sanders said President Donald Trump should consider resigning over sexual misconduct allegations made against him.
  • Several Senate Democrats have called for the president to resign in recent days, though they have stopped short of calling for his impeachment.
  • They spoke up after Democratic Sen. Al Franken of Minnesota resigned over his own sexual harassment accusations.


Sen. Bernie Sanders said on Sunday that he thinks President Donald Trump should consider stepping down over his sexual misconduct allegations.

In an interview on "Meet The Press," Sanders noted that Sen. Al Franken of Minnesota resigned after several women accused him of sexual harassment.

"Al Franken felt it proper for him to resign," Sanders said. "Here you have a president who has been accused by many women of assault, who says on a tape that he assaulted women. He might want to think about doing the same."

The Vermont Senator this week joined a number of Democratic Senators who have called for the president to step aside in the wake of Franken's resignation, citing the numerous allegations of sexual misconduct against Trump as well as the president's own boasts about grabbing women without their permission.

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Women who have accused Donald Trump of inappropriate sexual behavior
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Women who have accused Donald Trump of inappropriate sexual behavior
- JULY 23: Ninni Laaksonen Miss Finland attends Miss Universe Post Pageant VIP Party hosted by Chuck Nabit, Dave Geller, Ed St. John, Greg Barnhill, Freddie Wyatt, Rob Striker at The Standard Downtown on July 23, 2006. (Photo by Patrick McMullan/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images)
Karena Virginia, along with attorney Gloria Allred, speaks at a news conference October 20, 2016 in New York. Virginia, a yoga teacher and life coach from New York, came forward for the first time on October 20, 2016 to accuse Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump of engaging in inappropriate sexual conduct which occured in 1998. / AFP / DON EMMERT (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
Summer Zervos, a former contestant on the TV show The Apprentice, reacts next to lawyer Gloria Allred (L) while speaking about allegations of sexual misconduct against Donald Trump during a news conference in Los Angeles, California, U.S. October 14, 2016. REUTERS/Kevork Djansezian
EXCLUSIVE: Woman says Trump reached under her skirt and groped her in early 1990s - The Washington Post https://t.co/aUMLUvDi2z

Donald Trump's ex-wife Ivana Trump

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Jill Harth

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Temple Taggart McDowell

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Natasha Stoynoff

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Miss Washington USA 2013, Cassandra Searles

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Actress Tasha Dixon

(Photo by Paul Archuleta/FilmMagic)

Jessica Drake speaks to reporters about allegations of sexual misconduct against Donald Trump, alongside lawyer Gloria Allred (L) during a news conference in Los Angeles, California, U.S. October 22, 2016. REUTERS/Kevork Djansezian
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - OCTOBER 29: Jennifer Hawkins poses at the Myer Marquee on Derby Day at Flemington Racecourse on October 29, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images for the VRC)
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In an interview with Vice News last week, Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey suggested that the president should follow Franken's example and step down.

"I just watched Al Franken do the honorable thing and resign," Booker said. "My question is — why isn't Donald Trump doing the same thing? Who has more serious allegations against him, with more women who have come forward?"

On Thursday, Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon similarly called on Alabama GOP candidate Roy Moore and the president to step aside, pointing to the allegations of harassment against both men.

"The president should resign because he certainly has a track record with more than 17 women of horrific conduct," Merkley told "Meet The Press Daily."

For his part, Trump has never made any indication that he would resign willingly before the end of his term, and plans to run for reelection.

The president has repeatedly denied all harassment allegations against him, and has asked Democratic leaders who will run against him in 2020. The New York Times reported on Saturday that Trump told the leaders that Sanders would run "even if he’s in a wheelchair."

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People who might run against Trump in 2020
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People who might run against Trump in 2020

Former Vice President Joe Biden

(Photo by Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.)

(Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images)

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.)

(Photo by Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

Sen. Kamala Davis (D-Calif.)

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.)

(Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)

Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.)

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Facebook CEO and founder Mark Zuckerberg

(Photo by David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.)

(Photo by Jason LaVeris/FilmMagic)

Former U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (D)

(Photo by: REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes)

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.)

(Photo by: Lloyd Bishop/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images)

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo

(Photo credit MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)

Former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley

(Photo credit NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

Former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro

(Photo by Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.)

(Photo by Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.)

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Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio)

(Photo credit ZACH GIBSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick

(Photo by Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio

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Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban

(Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Environmental activist Tom Steyer

(Photo by David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez

(Photo by Taylor Hill/FilmMagic)

Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton 

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Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

California Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom

(Photo by Yichuan Cao/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg

(Photo credit FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images)

Former first lady Michelle Obama

(Photo by Gerardo Mora/Getty Images)

Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz

(Photo credit should read JASON REDMOND/AFP/Getty Images)

Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson

(Photo by Donna Ward/Getty Images)

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii)

(Photo credit TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)

Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.)

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-N.Y)

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

California Gov. Jerry Brown

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Media mogul Oprah Winfrey

(Photo by Moeletsi Mabe/Sunday Times/Gallo Images/Getty Images)

Former Sen. Russ Feingold (D-Wis.)

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean

(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Former Vice President Al Gore

(Photo credit DAVID MCNEW/AFP/Getty Images)

Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.)

(Photo by Katherine Frey/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Former Sen. Jim Webb (D-Va.)

(Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti

(Photo by Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images,)

Rep. Seth Moulton (D-Mass.)

(Photo by Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu

Albin Lohr-Jones/Pool via Bloomberg

Sen. Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.)

(Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee

(Photo by Karen Ducey/Getty Images)

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Though 58 Democrats in the House of Representatives voted to impeach Trump this week, Democratic leadership and many Senate Democrats like Sanders have largely avoided the issue. Sanders said he's not prepared to support impeaching Trump yet.

"I don't think we're there right now," Sanders said on Sunday, saying special prosecutor Robert Mueller's probe into Russian meddling in the 2016 election was working to uncover the Trump campaign's role. "That's what the Mueller investigation is all about."

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