Trump taunts woman who accused Roy Moore of sexual assault

President Trump taunted one of Roy Moore’s accusers on Friday at a rally where he urged supporters to vote for the embattled Senate candidate.

Just four days before the special election, Trump held a rally in Pensacola, Florida, and discredited Beverly Nelson, who accused Moore of sexually assaulting her when he was a district attorney.

Last month, Nelson produced a high school yearbook from 1977 with an inscription that read, “To a sweeter more beautiful girl I could not say Merry Christmas. Christmas 1977. Love, Roy Moore, DA. 12-22-77 Olde HIckory House.”

On Friday, Nelson said that while Moore wrote and signed the message, she added the date and “Olde Hickory House” — the name of the restaurant where she was a 16-year-old waitress at the time.

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President Trump holds a rally in Pensacola, Florida
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President Trump holds a rally in Pensacola, Florida
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at a rally in Pensacola, Florida, U.S., December 8, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
U.S. President Donald Trump gestures as he departs a rally in Pensacola, Florida, U.S., December 8, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at a rally in Pensacola, Florida, U.S., December 8, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
A supporter dressed as Uncle Sam walks around before U.S. President Donald Trump addresses a rally in Pensacola, Florida, U.S., December 8, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
U.S. President Donald Trump gestures as he arrives for a rally in Pensacola, Florida, U.S., December 8, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
U.S. President Donald Trump arrives for a rally in Pensacola, Florida, U.S., December 8, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks about protesters carrying signs at a rally in Pensacola, Florida, U.S., December 8, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
U.S. President Donald Trump arrives for a rally in Pensacola, Florida, U.S., December 8, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
U.S. President Donald Trump uses his famous "You're fired" line at a rally in Pensacola, Florida, U.S., December 8, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
A supporter holds up a sign as U.S. President Donald Trump holds a rally in Pensacola, Florida U.S. December 8, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump holds a rally in Pensacola, Florida, U.S. December 8, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump holds a rally in Pensacola, Florida, U.S. December 8, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Attendees listen as the U.S. National Anthem is played during a campaign rally with U.S. President Donald Trump in Pensacola, Florida, U.S., on Friday, Dec. 8, 2017. Trump�gave his most full-throated endorsement yet of Alabama Senate candidate�Roy Moore, casting aside calls for to shun the former judge whos been accused of sexual misconduct while seizing on reports that questioned the credibility of his accuser.�Photographer: Nicole Craine/Bloomberg via Getty Images
U.S. President Donald Trump applauds as he speaks during a rally in Pensacola, Florida, U.S., on Friday, Dec. 8, 2017. Trump�gave his most full-throated endorsement yet of Alabama Senate candidate�Roy Moore, casting aside calls for to shun the former judge whos been accused of sexual misconduct while seizing on reports that questioned the credibility of his accuser.�Photographer: Nicole Craine/Bloomberg via Getty Images
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a rally in Pensacola, Florida, U.S., on Friday, Dec. 8, 2017. Trump�gave his most full-throated endorsement yet of Alabama Senate candidate�Roy Moore, casting aside calls for to shun the former judge whos been accused of sexual misconduct while seizing on reports that questioned the credibility of his accuser.�Photographer: Nicole Craine/Bloomberg via Getty Images
An attendee holds a sign reading 'CNN. MSNBC. Fake News.' during a campaign rally with U.S. President Donald Trump in Pensacola, Florida, U.S., on Friday, Dec. 8, 2017. Trump�gave his most full-throated endorsement yet of Alabama Senate candidate�Roy Moore, casting aside calls for to shun the former judge whos been accused of sexual misconduct while seizing on reports that questioned the credibility of his accuser.�Photographer: Nicole Craine/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A supporter cheers as US President Donald Trump speaks during a rally at the Pensacola Bay Center on December 8, 2017 in Pensacola, Florida. / AFP PHOTO / Nicholas Kamm (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
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While lawyer Gloria Allred said at a press conference on Friday that a handwriting analyst confirmed the signature was indeed Moore’s, Trump seized on Nelson’s comments.

“Did you see what happened today? You know, the yearbook? Did you see that? There was a little mistake made,” Trump said, shifting to a sing-songy voice. “She started writing things in the yearbook.”

Trump then attacked Allred, who has also represented women accusing the president of sexual harassment and assault.

“Anytime you see her, you know something’s gone wrong," Trump said.

Trump also told the crowd, “Get out and vote for Roy Moore. Do it. Do it.”

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Women who have accused Roy Moore of sexual assault
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Women who have accused Roy Moore of sexual assault
Beverly Nelson (L) shows a school year book with attorney Gloria Allread during a news conference announcing new allegations of sexual misconduct against Alabama Republican congressional candidate Roy Moore, in New York, November 13, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Gloria Deason
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Gloria Deason
Wendy Miller
Gloria Deason
Accuser Beverly Young Nelson, reacts while reading a statement claiming that Alabama senate candidate Roy Moore sexually harassed her when she was 16, in New York, U.S., November 13, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Attorney Gloria Allred stands with accuser Beverly Young Nelson, holding a sketch of herself made when she was 16 after reading a statement claiming that Alabama senate candidate Roy Moore sexually harassed her when she was 16, in New York, U.S., November 13, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Beverly Nelson (L) reacts as she reads a statement to reporters with attorney Gloria Allred during a news conference announcing new allegations of sexual misconduct against Alabama Republican congressional candidate Roy Moore, in New York, November 13, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 13: Beverly Young Nelson (L) speaks to the media with her lawyer Gloria Allred, at a news conference where she has accused Alabama Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore of sexually abusing her when she was 16 on November 13, 2017 in New York City. Moore, a controversial politician who recently won a run-off against Luther Strange for Alabama's Senate seat, is currently fighting accusations alleging that he pursued sexual relationships with teenagers -- including a 14-year-old -- when he was in his 30s. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
MEGYN KELLY TODAY -- Pictured: Tina Johnson and Megyn Kelly on Friday, November 17, 2017 -- (Photo by: Nathan Congleton/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images)
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“We cannot afford, the future of this country cannot afford to lose the seat,” Trump said, referring to his party’s razor-thin 52-48 advantage in that chamber of Congress.

Earlier Friday, White House spokesman Raj Shah told reporters on board Air Force One, “It’s not that he’s not going to Alabama. It’s that he is going to Pensacola.”

But the location — so close to the Alabama state line and feeding its television markets — stoked speculation that it was a backdoor way for the president to boost Moore’s campaign without actually setting foot in the state.

Shah said the president and White House have made clear that the Moore allegations are “troubling and concerning” and “should be taken seriously.” He also noted that Moore has maintained his innocence, and said that should be considered as well.

If the White House was trying to maintain some distance with Moore, Trump made it abundantly clear that he endorsed the candidate, who has been dogged by multiple allegations of sexual misconduct.

Trump, who formally backed the former Alabama judge this week, bashed Moore’s opponent Doug Jones on Twitter, writing that a “Liberal Democrat” is the “LAST thing the Make America Great AGain Agenda needs.”

Moore tweeted that he agreed with Trump.

“You’re right Mr. President! We can’t Make America Great Again with another radical liberal in the US Senate,” he said. “I look forward to working with you to pass the America First Agenda!”

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Roy Moore and his wife, Kayla, through the years
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Roy Moore and his wife, Kayla, through the years
GALLANT, AL - SEPTEMBER 26: Alabama Republican U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore on Sassy and wife Kayla on Sundance ride their horses to the Gallant Fire Hall to vote in today's GOP runoff election September 26, 2017 in Gallant, Alabama. Moore is running against Sen. Luther Strange (R-AL) to fill Jeff Session's seat. (Photo by Hal Yeager/Getty Images)
Republican Roy Moore, along with his wife Kayla, arrive at the RSA Activity Center in Montgomery, Alabama, U.S. September 26, 2017, during the runoff election for the Republican nomination for Alabama's U.S. Senate seat vacated by Attorney General Jeff Sessions. REUTERS/Marvin Gentry
Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore and his wife Kayla arrive at state Supreme Court in Montgomery, Alabama, November 13, 2003. Moore, whose refusal to obey a U.S. order to move a Ten Commandments monument fueled a national debate over the place of God in public life, was stripped of his office by a state judicial panel on Thursday. REUTERS/Bob Ealum BE/SV
Suspended Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore (R) exits the Alabama Supreme Court chamber with his wife Kayla following the reading of the verdict of the Alabama Court of the Judiciary at the Alabama Judicial Building in Montgomery, Alabama, November 13, 2003. Moore, whose refusal to obey a U.S. order to move a Ten Commandments monument fueled a national debate over the place of God in public life, was stripped of his office by a state judicial panel on Thursday. REUTERS/Mickey Welsh /Advertiser/POOL MW/SV
Ex-Trump adviser Sebastian Gorka (L) campaigns for U.S. Senate candidate Judge Roy Moore, with his wife Kayla Moore (R), at the Historic Union Station Train Shed in Montgomery, Alabama, U.S. September 21, 2017. REUTERS/Tami Chappell
Judge Roy Moore's wife Kayla participates in the Mid-Alabama Republican Club's Veterans Day Program in Vestavia Hills, Alabama, U.S., November 11, 2017. REUTERS/Marvin Gentry
BIRMINGHAM, AL - NOVEMBER 16: Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Judge Roy Moore speaks as his wife Kayla Moore looks on during a news conference with supporters and faith leaders, November 16, 2017 in Birmingham, Alabama. Moore refused to answer questions regarding sexual harassment allegations and pursuing relationships with underage women. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
BIRMINGHAM, AL - NOVEMBER 16: Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Judge Roy Moore and his wife Kayla Moore exit a news conference with supporters and faith leaders, November 16, 2017 in Birmingham, Alabama. Moore refused to answer questions regarding sexual harassment allegations and pursuing relationships with underage women. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
MONTGOMERY, AL - SEPTEMBER 26: Republican candidate for the U.S. Senate in Alabama, Roy Moore and his wife Kayla greet supporters at an election-night rally on September 26, 2017 in Montgomery, Alabama. Moore, former chief justice of the Alabama supreme court, defeated incumbent Luther Strange in a primary runoff election for the seat vacated when Jeff Sessions was appointed U.S. Attorney General by President Donald Trump. Moore will now face Democratic candidate Doug Jones in the general election in December. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
GALLANT, AL - SEPTEMBER 26: Alabama Republican U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore and wife Kayla leave the Gallant Fire Hall after voting in today's GOP runoff election September 26, 2017 in Gallant, Alabama. Moore is running against Sen. Luther Strange (R-AL) to fill Jeff Session's seat. (Photo by Hal Yeager/Getty Images)
MONTGOMERY, AL - SEPTEMBER 26: Republican candidate for the U.S. Senate in Alabama, Roy Moore and his wife Kayla greet supporters at an election-night rally on September 26, 2017 in Montgomery, Alabama. Moore, former chief justice of the Alabama supreme court, defeated incumbent Luther Strange in a primary runoff election for the seat vacated when Jeff Sessions was appointed U.S. Attorney General by President Donald Trump. Moore will now face Democratic candidate Doug Jones in the general election in December. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
GALLANT, AL - SEPTEMBER 26: Alabama Republican U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore, mother Evelyn Ridgeway (L), and wife Kayla (R) prepare to vote at the Gallant Fire Hall in today's GOP runoff election September 26, 2017 in Gallant, Alabama. Moore is running against Sen. Luther Strange (R-AL) to fill Jeff Session's seat. (Photo by Hal Yeager/Getty Images)
Ex-Trump adviser Sebastian Gorka (L) applauds as he campaigns for U.S. Senate candidate Judge Roy Moore with his wife Kayla Moore (R) at the Historic Union Station Train Shed in Montgomery, Alabama, U.S., September 21, 2017. REUTERS/Tami Chappell TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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