Rohingya widows find safe haven in Bangladesh camp

COX'S BAZAR, Dec 8 (Reuters) - Dawn hues of pink and purple reveal a dusty valley in Bangladesh's southern hills quilted with a dense settlement of red tents home to more than 230 women and children grieving for lost husbands and fathers.

They are among more than 625,000 Rohingya Muslims who have fled to Bangladesh since late August, following a crackdown by the Myanmar military in response to attacks on security forces by Rohingya militants.

Roshid Jan, who walked for 10 days with her five children to Bangladesh after soldiers burnt their village, wept when she spoke about her missing husband.

He was accused of being a member of the Rohingya militants and arrested with four other villagers 11 months ago, she said.

24 PHOTOS
Rohingya widows find safe haven in Bangladesh camp
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Rohingya widows find safe haven in Bangladesh camp
Roshid Jan, a Rohingya refugee who said she is not sure about her age, cries holding her son Muhammad Gyab at their shelter at the camp for widows and orphans inside the Balukhali camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, December 5, 2017. Roshid Jan, who walked for 10 days with her five children to Bangladesh after soldiers burnt their village, wept when she spoke about her missing husband. The religious leader in their Phansi village in Myanmar's Rakhine state was accused of being a member of the Rohingya militants and arrested 11 months ago, she said. She had not seen him or heard about his fate since then. Now she lives with her five children and more than 230 others at camp for Rohingya widows and orphans. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj SEARCH "ROHINGYA WIDOWS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A Rohingya refugee child cries at the camp for widows and orphans inside the Balukhali camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, December 5, 2017. More than 230 women and children live at a so-called widows camp built by fellow refugees with the help of donor funds for Rohingya widows and orphans to offer them better protection and shelter. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj SEARCH "ROHINGYA WIDOWS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A Rohingya refugee child stands on a hill above the camp for widows and orphans inside the Balukhali camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, December 5, 2017. More than 230 women and children live at a so-called widows camp built by fellow refugees with the help of donor funds for Rohingya widows and orphans to offer them better protection and shelter. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj SEARCH "ROHINGYA WIDOWS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A Rohingya refugee child sweeps in between tents in the camp for widows and orphans inside the Balukhali camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, December 5, 2017. More than 230 women and children live at a so-called widows camp built by fellow refugees with the help of donor funds for Rohingya widows and orphans to offer them better protection and shelter. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj SEARCH "ROHINGYA WIDOWS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Rohingya refugees share a light moment as they cook dinner at the camp for widows and orphans inside the Balukhali camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, December 5, 2017. More than 230 women and children live at a so-called widows camp built by fellow refugees with the help of donor funds for Rohingya widows and orphans to offer them better protection and shelter. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj SEARCH "ROHINGYA WIDOWS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A Rohingya refugee child cries at the camp for widows and orphans inside the Balukhali camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh December 5, 2017. More than 230 women and children live at a so-called widows camp built by fellow refugees with the help of donor funds for Rohingya widows and orphans to offer them better protection and shelter. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj SEARCH "ROHINGYA WIDOWS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Roshid Jan, a Rohingya refugee who said she is not sure about her age, sits with her children at their shelter at the camp for widows and orphans inside the Balukhali camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, December 5, 2017. Roshid Jan, who walked for 10 days with her five children to Bangladesh after soldiers burnt their village, wept when she spoke about her missing husband. The religious leader in their Phansi village in Myanmar's Rakhine state was accused of being a member of the Rohingya militants and arrested 11 months ago, she said. She had not seen him or heard about his fate since then. Now she lives with her five children and more than 230 others at camp for Rohingya widows and orphans. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj SEARCH "ROHINGYA WIDOWS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Gol Bahar, a 45-year-old Rohingya refugee poses for a picture with her grandchild at her shelter in the camp for widows and orphans inside the Balukhali camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, December 5, 2017. Gol Bahar, from Labadug village in Buthidaung township, said her husband, who was collecting wood as the area came under attack from Myanmar military, is among many missing Rohingya men from their village. Gol Bahar now lives with her two daughters and more than 230 others at the camp for Rohingya widows and orphans. Two of her other, married daughters, also found shelter with their families at Balukhali camp and she sometimes takes care of their children. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj SEARCH "ROHINGYA WIDOWS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Zi Porbin, a 14-year-old Rohingya orphan, is photographed at her shelter in the camp for widows and orphans inside the Balukhali camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, December 5, 2017. Zi Porbin, whose mother died of illness two years ago, said she fled Sindi Prang village, Buthidaung township with other Rohingya as it was attacked by Mynamar military three days before Eid al-Adha in September this year. She was told by other villagers that her father was killed in the attack. Zi Porbin and her younger sister now live with their aunt whose husband was also killed the same day, and more than 230 others in the camp for Rohingya widows and orphans. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj SEARCH "ROHINGYA WIDOWS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Aisha Begum, a-19 year-old Rohingya refugee, holds her daughter and cries as she tells her story at the camp for widows and orphans inside the Balukhali camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, December 5, 2017. Aisha Begum said her husband was killed by Myanmar soldiers as their band of refugees headed for Bangladesh. "I was sitting there by his body and just crying, crying, crying," she said. "He was caught and killed with knives. I found his body by the road. It was in three pieces," she cried, recounting the events that brought her to the camp. Aisha Begum now lives with her two children and more than 230 others at the camp for Rohingya widows and orphans. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj SEARCH "ROHINGYA WIDOWS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Rabiya Khatun, a 22-year-old Rohingya refugee, poses for a picture at her shelter at the camp for Rohingya widows and orphans inside the Balukhali camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, December 5, 2017. Rabiya Khatun, from Buthidaung township, said she was told by a village leader, a Rakhine Buddist, that her husband and other Rohingya were killed by Myanmar soldiers while working in forest five days before Eid al-Adha holiday this year. Soon after that they decided to leave for Bangladesh with other villagers, she said. Rabiya Khatun now lives with her son and more than 230 others at the camp for widows and orphans. "For those with no protection, a camp like this is much safer," said Khatun. "No man can enter that easily. Also, the rooms are bigger and we have more chances of receiving some aid." REUTERS/Damir Sagolj SEARCH "ROHINGYA WIDOWS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Rohingya refugees gather around a water pump in the camp for widows and orphans inside the Balukhali camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, December 5, 2017. More than 230 women and children live at a so-called widows camp built by fellow refugees with the help of donor funds for Rohingya widows and orphans to offer them better protection and shelter. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj SEARCH "ROHINGYA WIDOWS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A Rohingya refugee child poses in between tents in the camp for widows and orphans inside the Balukhali camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, December 5, 2017. More than 230 women and children live at a so-called widows camp built by fellow refugees with the help of donor funds for Rohingya widows and orphans to offer them better protection and shelter. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj SEARCH "ROHINGYA WIDOWS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Rohingya refugees pass the time at the kitchen of the camp for widows and orphans inside the Balukhali camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, December 5, 2017. More than 230 women and children live at a so-called widows camp built by fellow refugees with the help of donor funds for Rohingya widows and orphans to offer them better protection and shelter. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj SEARCH "ROHINGYA WIDOWS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Rohingya refugees look from inside a kitchen of the camp for widows and orphans inside the Balukhali camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, December 4, 2017. More than 230 women and children live at a so-called widows camp built by fellow refugees with the help of donor funds for Rohingya widows and orphans to offer them better protection and shelter. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj SEARCH "ROHINGYA WIDOWS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Roshid Jan, a Rohingya refugee who said she is not sure about her age, cries holding her son Muhammad Gyab at their shelter at the camp for widows and orphans inside the Balukhali camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, December 5, 2017. Roshid Jan, who walked for 10 days with her five children to Bangladesh after soldiers burnt their village, wept when she spoke about her missing husband. The religious leader in their Phansi village in Myanmar's Rakhine state was accused of being a member of the Rohingya militants and arrested 11 months ago, she said. She had not seen him or heard about his fate since then. Now she lives with her five children and more than 230 others at camp for Rohingya widows and orphans. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj SEARCH "ROHINGYA WIDOWS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A makeshift mosque is seen on a hill near the camp for widows and orphans at the Balukhali camp for Rohingya refugees near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, December 5, 2017. More than 230 women and children live at a so-called widows camp built by fellow refugees with the help of donor funds for Rohingya widows and orphans to offer them better protection and shelter. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj SEARCH "ROHINGYA WIDOWS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Rihana Begum, a 30-year-old Rohingya refugee and mother of five, is photographed at their shelter at the camp for widows and orphans inside the Balukhali camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, December 5, 2017. Rihana Begum said she fled her village of Supa Rang in Myanmar after it was attacked and burnt by military three days after Eid al-Adha holiday is September this year. Her husband was shot while trying to escape from the village that was under attack, she added. "I'm so afraid that I will never go back to Myanmar," Rihana Begum said. "I would rather die here." She lives with her five children in a room that is bare except for a few tomatoes, some religious books and clothes at the camp for widows and orphans. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj SEARCH "ROHINGYA WIDOWS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Rohingya refugees look from inside their shelter as food ration cards are distributed at the camp for widows and orphans inside the Balukhali camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, December 5, 2017. More than 230 women and children live at a so-called widows camp built by fellow refugees with the help of donor funds for Rohingya widows and orphans to offer them better protection and shelter. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj SEARCH "ROHINGYA WIDOWS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A Rohingya refugee looks from inside a kitchen of the camp for widows and orphans inside the Balukhali camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, December 5, 2017. More than 230 women and children live at a so-called widows camp built by fellow refugees with the help of donor funds for Rohingya widows and orphans to offer them better protection and shelter. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj SEARCH "ROHINGYA WIDOWS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A Rohingya refugee child washes dishes in muddy waters outside the camp for widows and orphans inside the Balukhali camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, December 5, 2017. More than 230 women and children live at a so-called widows camp built by fellow refugees with the help of donor funds for Rohingya widows and orphans to offer them better protection and shelter. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj SEARCH "ROHINGYA WIDOWS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Rohingya refugees build a well in the camp for widows and orphans inside the Balukhali camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, December 5, 2017. More than 230 women and children live at a so-called widows camp built by fellow refugees with the help of donor funds for Rohingya widows and orphans to offer them better protection and shelter. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj SEARCH "ROHINGYA WIDOWS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Rohingya refugees build a well in the camp for widows and orphans inside the Balukhali camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, December 5, 2017. More than 230 women and children live at a so-called widows camp built by fellow refugees with the help of donor funds for Rohingya widows and orphans to offer them better protection and shelter. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj SEARCH "ROHINGYA WIDOWS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
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She had not seen him or heard about his fate since then.

Aisha Begum, a 19-year-old widow, said her husband was killed by Myanmar soldiers as their band of refugees headed for Bangladesh.

"I was sitting there by his body and just crying, crying, crying," she said.

"He was caught and killed with knives. I found his body by the road. It was in three pieces," she cried, recounting the events that brought her to the camp.

Most Rohingya are stateless and seen as illegal immigrants by Buddhist-majority Myanmar.

The United Nations and United States have described the military's actions as ethnic cleansing, and rights groups have accused the security forces of atrocities, including rape, arson and killings.

Myanmar's government has denied most of the claims, and the army has said its own probe found no evidence of wrongdoing by troops.

There are 50 tents and no men in the camp for widows and orphans, the biggest of three sites built with donor funds from Muslim-majority Pakistan in the refugee settlement of Balukhali not far from Bangladesh's resort town of Cox's Bazar.

Two makeshift kitchens provide space for cooking in small holes in the ground, a new well is being dug to supplement a water pump, and a big tent serves for prayers.

19 PHOTOS
Tragic scenes from the Bangladesh-Myanmar border
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Tragic scenes from the Bangladesh-Myanmar border
Nur Kabir, 5, a Rohingya refugee boy stands in the rain as he waits to receive permission from the Bangladeshi army to continue his way after crossing the Bangladesh-Myanmar border, at a port in Teknaf, Bangladesh, October 31, 2017. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
A Rohingya refugee woman protects her son from rain as she looks towards the beach after crossing the Bangladesh-Myanmar border, at a port in Teknaf, Bangladesh October 31, 2017. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
People look at a boat that capsized with a group of Rohingya refugees in it at Bailakhali, near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, October 31, 2017. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
Rohingya refugees, who crossed from Myanmar, walk to a registration centre in Teknaf, Bangladesh, October 31, 2017. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
Rohingya refugees, who crossed from Myanmar, walk to a registration centre in Teknaf, Bangladesh, October 31, 2017. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
Lalu Begum, 45, a Rohingya refugee is carried by her son Hasim as they walk towards the registration point after crossing the Bangladesh-Myanmar border, at a port in Teknaf, Bangladesh, October 31, 2017. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
A Rohingya refugee boy, who crossed from Myanmar, walks to a registration centre in Teknaf, Bangladesh, October 31, 2017. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
A Rohingya refugee girl carries her belongings as she walks towards the registration point after crossing the Bangladesh-Myanmar border, at a port in Teknaf, Bangladesh October 31, 2017. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi
A Rohingya refugee child smiles whilst sheltering from the rain as they wait to receive permission from the Bangladeshi army to continue their way after crossing the Bangladesh-Myanmar border, at a port in Teknaf, Bangladesh, October 31, 2017. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
ATTENTION EDITORS - VISUAL COVERAGE OF SCENES OF INJURY OR DEATH Ali Johar, 35, holds the hand of his daughter Minara, 4, who died after a boat with Rohingya refugees fleeing from Myanmar capsized, at a hospital in Shamlapur near Cox?s Bazar, Bangladesh October 31, 2017. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi TEMPLATE OUT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
ATTENTION EDITORS - VISUAL COVERAGE OF SCENES OF INJURY OR DEATH Minara, 4, who died after a boat with Rohingya refugees fleeing from Myanmar capsized, lies in a hospital in Shamlapur near Cox?s Bazar, Bangladesh October 31, 2017. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi TEMPLATE OUT
A Rohingya refugee woman holds Fatema Khatun, 20, who is suffering from fever, as they wait to receive permission from the Bangladeshi army to continue their way after crossing the Bangladesh-Myanmar border, at a port in Teknaf, Bangladesh October 31, 2017. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi
A Rohingya refugee boy cries as he waits to receive permission from the Bangladeshi army to continue his way after crossing the Bangladesh-Myanmar border, at a port in Teknaf, Bangladesh, October 31, 2017. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
Rohingya refugees wait to receive permission from the Bangladeshi army to continue their way after crossing the Bangladesh-Myanmar border, at a port in Teknaf, Bangladesh, October 31, 2017. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
ATTENTION EDITORS - VISUAL COVERAGE OF SCENES OF INJURY OR DEATH Ali Johar, 35, holds his daughter Minara's, 4, head, who died after a boat with Rohingya refugees fleeing from Myanmar capsized, at a hospital in Shamlapur near Cox?s Bazar, Bangladesh October 31, 2017. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi TEMPLATE OUT
A man holds an umbrella as he stands on a boat, which capsized with a group of Rohingya refugees at Bailakhali, near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, October 31, 2017. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
Rohingya refugees, who were on a boat travelling from Myanmar that capsized at Bailakhali beach, wait to transported to a refugee camp from the beach, near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, October 31, 2017. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
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"For those who can't pray, we have learning sessions on Monday and Friday in a special room," said 20-year-old Suwa Leha, who serves as the camp's unofficial leader.

Praying and reading the Muslim holy book, the Koran, was one of two conditions for admittance set by religious and group leaders, Suwa said. The other was that widows and orphans be selected from among the most vulnerable and needy.

The camp is marooned amid ponds and streams of dirty water left by the washing of clothes and dishes. Behind are thousands of dwellings in a vast refugee camp that sprang up during the crisis.

Still, the women are relieved to have their own space.

"For those with no protection, a camp like this is much safer," said 22-year-old Rabiya Khatun, who lives there with her son. "No man can enter that easily. Also, the rooms are bigger and we have more chances of receiving some aid."

Women and girls number about 51 percent of the distressed and traumatized Rohingya population in the Cox's Bazar camps, the U.N. Women agency said in October.

"Women and children are also at heightened risk of becoming victims of human trafficking, sexual abuse or child and forced marriage," it added.

Women and adolescent girls aged between 13 and 20 arriving from Myanmar typically had two to four children each, it said, with some of them pregnant.

29 PHOTOS
Children impacted by Rohingya crisis in Myanmar
See Gallery
Children impacted by Rohingya crisis in Myanmar
Rohingya refugees, who crossed the border from Myanmar two days earlier, walk after they received permission from the Bangladesh army to continue their way to the Kutupalong refugee camp, in Balukhali near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 19, 2017. REUTERS/ Zohra Bensemra
Rohingya refugee sits with her baby while waiting to receive humanitarian aid after arriving at Kutupalong refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Rohingya refugee baby, who crossed the border from Myanmar two days earlier, sleeps on his mother's shoulder while waiting to receive humanitarian aid after arriving at Kutupalong refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Rohingya refugees, who crossed the border from Myanmar two days earlier, queue to receive humanitarian aid while arriving at Kutupalong refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
A Rohingya refugee girl, who crossed the border from Myanmar two days earlier, waits to receive humanitarian aid at Kutupalong refugee camp, near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 19, 2017. REUTERS/ Zohra Bensemra
A Rohingya refugee girl who crossed the border from Myanmar two days before, crawls under a barbed wire during her walk to the Kotupalang refugee camp near Cox's Bazar in Bangladesh October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Rohingya refugees, who crossed the border from Myanmar two days earlier, rest while they wait to receive humanitarian aids at Kutupalong refugees camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
Rohingya refugees, who crossed the border from Myanmar two days earlier, rest while they wait to receive humanitarian aids at Kutupalong refugees camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 19, 2017. REUTERS/ Zohra Bensemra
A Rohingya refugee boy sits on the ground at Tang Khali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 18, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
A Rohingya refugee girl poses with a chicken at Balukhali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar in Bangladesh October 17, 2017. Picture taken October 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Mohamed Hares, an 8-month-old Rohingya refugee, receives treatment for a lung infection at the Red Cross emergency hospital near Kotupalang refugee camp, near Cox's Bazar in Bangladesh October 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A still unnamed four-days-old Rohingya refugee baby who crossed the border from Myanmar a day before, waits with his mother to receive permission from the Bangladeshi army to continue their way to the refugee camps, in Palang Khali, Bangladesh October 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A Rohingya refugee baby who crossed the border from Myanmar a day before, sleeps with his mother on a field as they wait to receive permission from the Bangladeshi army to continue their way to the refugee camps, in Palang Khali, Bangladesh October 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Rohingya refugees who crossed the border from Myanmar a day before, sleep on a field as they wait to receive permission from the Bangladeshi army to continue their way to the refugee camps, in Palang Khali, Bangladesh October 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Rohingya refugees arrive to the Bangladeshi side of the Naf river after crossing the border from Myanmar, in Palang Khali, Bangladesh October 16, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Rohingya refugees who fled from Myanmar wait to be let through after they were forced to walk back by Bangladesh border guards, in Palang Khali, Bangladesh October 16, 2017. REUTERS/ Zohra Bensemra
A 7 months old, malnourished Rohingya child cries as she lies on the floor at her family shelter in Kutupalong, refugees camp in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, October 15, 2017. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
Hamida, 65, a Rohingya refugee, who fled from Myanmar a day before, reacts after she along with other newly arrived refugees, spent a night waiting to be allowed to walk to a relief centre in Teknaf, near Cox's Bazar in Bangladesh, October 13, 2017. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
A Rohingya refugee girl queues to receive food at a camp near Teknaf, Bangladesh October 12, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Rohingya refugees who crossed the border last night ride on the back of the truck that takes them to a camp near Teknaf, Bangladesh October 12, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
A Rohingya refugee child lines up to receive an oral cholera vaccine, distributed by the World Health Organisation (WHO) with the help of volunteers and local NGO's, in a refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 11, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
A Rohingya refugee child gets an oral cholera vaccine, distributed by the World Health Organisation (WHO) with the help of volunteers and local NGO's, in a refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 11, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
A Rohingya refugee child gets an oral cholera vaccine, distributed by the World Health Organisation (WHO) with the help of volunteers and local NGO's, in a refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 11, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
A daughter of Ansar Ullah, a Rohingya refugee who fled with his family from Myanmar a day before, is carried in a basket by her father after thousands of newly arrived refugees spent a night by the road between refugee camps near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 10, 2017. Ansar Ullah, who said his village in Buthidaung region was attacked by Myanmar military, carried his two daughters in baskets for eight days as he and other refugees were making their way to Bangladesh. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Nd Rashid, a 28-year-old Rohingya refugee who fled with his family from Myanmar a day before, waits for medical attention after spending the night by the road between refugee camps near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 10, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Rohingya refugees walk in a rice field after crossing the border in Palang Khali, Bangladesh October 9, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
A Rohingya refugee man hols his child as he swims to cross Myanmar-Bangladesh border in Palang Khali, Bangladesh, October 9, 2017. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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No relief agencies officially run the camp for the widows and orphans but aid groups and individuals help out.

Rihana Begum lives with her five children in a room that is bare except for a few tomatoes, some religious books and clothes. On a thin mat lies her daughter, ill with fever, but fear of missing food handouts keeps them away from the doctor.

"I'm afraid to miss aid distribution. I can't afford to miss it," she said on the day ration cards from the World Food Program were distributed in the camp.

This week, Myanmar said it was finalizing terms for a joint working group with Bangladesh to launch the process of safe and voluntary return of the Rohingya refugees within two months.

That may not be enough to allay Rihana Begum's fears.

"I'm so afraid that I will never go back to Myanmar," she said. "I would rather die here."

(Reporting by Damir Sagolj; Writing by Clarence Fernandez; Editing by Darren Schuettler)

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