South Florida snake hunters catch a 17-foot python

If you’ve ever seen the film Anaconda, you know that snakes can be a huge problem. 

The Florida Everglades apparently has a similar issue, with a trio of snake hunters setting a South Florida record for catching the largest one yet.

Three snake hunters caught a 17-foot long Burmese python as part of the South Florida Water Management Districts python elimination program. 

Jason Leon who helped catch the snake told local news, "that snake could pretty much kill any full-grown man."

16 PHOTOS
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
See Gallery
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
Nicholas Delrossi, 63, works a hissing, snapping Burmese python into a bag during a Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission "python patrol" training class in West Palm Beach, Florida February 1, 2015. Florida wildlife officials have opened a new front in the seemingly endless war on invasive snakes and are recruiting the general public to take part in so-called ?python patrols? teaching them how to identify and even capture some of the snakes. REUTERS/Zachary Fagenson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
Mark Tamblyn, 50, prepares to secure a large Burmese python in a storage bag during a Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission "python patrol" training class in West Palm Beach, Florida February 1, 2015. Florida wildlife officials have opened a new front in the seemingly endless war on invasive snakes and are recruiting the general public to take part in so-called ?python patrols? teaching them how to identify and even capture some of the snakes. REUTERS/Zachary Fagenson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
Billy Gallagher, 40, captures a Burmese python during a Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission "python patrol" training class in West Palm Beach, Florida February 1, 2015. Florida wildlife officials have opened a new front in the seemingly endless war on invasive snakes and are recruiting the general public to take part in so-called ?python patrols? teaching them how to identify and even capture some of the snakes. REUTERS/Zachary Fagenson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
A U.S. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission officer holds a burmese python during a training with Soul River group at the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refugee in Boynton Beach, Florida on June 19, 2017. Founded by war veteran Chad Brown, Soul River is an non profit organization aimed to bring together veterans dealing with PTSD and challenged inner city youth, and take them to the outdoors to help them reduce stress and find healing through nature. / AFP PHOTO / Javier GALEANO / TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Leila MACOR, 'War vets, inner city youth join to trap Florida pythons' (Photo credit should read JAVIER GALEANO/AFP/Getty Images)
Tyrell Hall and a U.S. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission staff holds a burmese python during a training with a Soul River group at the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refugee in Boynton Beach, Florida on June 19, 2017. Founded by war veteran Chad Brown, Soul River is an non profit organization aimed to bring together veterans dealing with PTSD and challenged inner city youth, and take them to the outdoors to help them reduce stress and find healing through nature. / AFP PHOTO / Javier GALEANO / TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Leila MACOR, 'War vets, inner city youth join to trap Florida pythons' (Photo credit should read JAVIER GALEANO/AFP/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JANUARY 29: Edward Mercer, a Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission non-native Wildlife Technician, holds a North African Python during a press conference in the Florida Everglades about the non-native species on January 29, 2015 in Miami, Florida. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission along with the Everglades Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (ECISMA), Miami-Dade County, National Park Service, South Florida Water Management District, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, United States Geological Survey, University of Florida were surveying an area for the Northern African pythons (also called African rock pythons) and the Burmese Python in western Miami-Dade County. The teams of snake hunters were checking the levees, canals and marsh on foot for the invasive species of reptile. Many of the non-native snakes have been introduced in to the wild when people release pet snakes after they grow to large to keep. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JANUARY 29: Edward Mercer, a Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission non-native Wildlife Technician, holds a North African Python during a press conference in the Florida Everglades about the non-native species on January 29, 2015 in Miami, Florida. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission along with the Everglades Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (ECISMA), Miami-Dade County, National Park Service, South Florida Water Management District, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, United States Geological Survey, University of Florida were surveying an area for the Northern African pythons (also called African rock pythons) and the Burmese Python in western Miami-Dade County. The teams of snake hunters were checking the levees, canals and marsh on foot for the invasive species of reptile. Many of the non-native snakes have been introduced in to the wild when people release pet snakes after they grow to large to keep. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JANUARY 29: Edward Mercer, a Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission non-native Wildlife Technician, holds a Burmese Python during a press conference in the Florida Everglades about the non-native species on January 29, 2015 in Miami, Florida. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission along with the Everglades Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (ECISMA), Miami-Dade County, National Park Service, South Florida Water Management District, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, United States Geological Survey, University of Florida were surveying an area for the Northern African pythons (also called African rock pythons) and the Burmese Python in western Miami-Dade County. The teams of snake hunters were checking the levees, canals and marsh on foot for the invasive species of reptile. Many of the non-native snakes have been introduced in to the wild when people release pet snakes after they grow to large to keep. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JANUARY 29: Jenny Ketterlin Eckles (L) a non-native Wildlife Biologist, and Edward Mercer, non-native Wildlife Technician, both with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission hold a North African Python during a press conference in the Florida Everglades about the non-native species on January 29, 2015 in Miami, Florida. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission along with the Everglades Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (ECISMA), Miami-Dade County, National Park Service, South Florida Water Management District, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, United States Geological Survey, University of Florida were surveying an area for the Northern African pythons (also called African rock pythons) and the Burmese Python in western Miami-Dade County. The teams of snake hunters were checking the levees, canals and marsh on foot for the invasive species of reptile. Many of the non-native snakes have been introduced in to the wild when people release pet snakes after they grow to large to keep. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
FORT LAUDERDALE, FL - JANUARY 22: Liz Barraco, exotic pet amnesty coordinator for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission shows off a red-footed tortoise and ball python during a call for people who own exotic pets like these to turn them in during the Exotic Pet Amnesty Program on January 22, 2014 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.The program scheduled for Saturday is an effort to reduce the number of nonnative species being released into the wild by pet owners who can no longer care for their pets or no longer wish to keep them. Amnesty Day events are held around the state to provide the opportunity for people to surrender their nonnative pets free of charge with no penalties. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
FORT LAUDERDALE, FL - JANUARY 22: Liz Barraco, exotic pet amnesty coordinator for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission shows off a red-footed tortoise and ball python during a call for people who own exotic pets like these to turn them in during the Exotic Pet Amnesty Program on January 22, 2014 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.The program scheduled for Saturday is an effort to reduce the number of nonnative species being released into the wild by pet owners who can no longer care for their pets or no longer wish to keep them. Amnesty Day events are held around the state to provide the opportunity for people to surrender their nonnative pets free of charge with no penalties. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
NOAA's Teacher at Sea, Amy Orchard of Tucson, Ariz., shows off the invasive lionfish caught by scientists from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) in the Dry Tortugas. (Cammy Clark/Miami Herald/MCT via Getty Images)
FORT LAUDERDALE, FL - JANUARY 22: A hedgehog is seen during a press conference by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to encourage people who own exotic pets like the hedgehog to turn them in during the Exotic Pet Amnesty Program on January 22, 2014 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.The program scheduled for Saturday is an effort to reduce the number of nonnative species being released into the wild by pet owners who can no longer care for their pets or no longer wish to keep them. Amnesty Day events are held around the state to provide the opportunity for people to surrender their nonnative pets free of charge with no penalties. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
WEST PALM BEACH, FL - APRIL 03: A 2-year-old Florida panther is released into the wild by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) on April 3, 2013 in West Palm Beach, Florida. The panther and its sister had been raised at the White Oak Conservation Center since they were 5 months old. The FWC rescued the two panthers as kittens in September 2011 in northern Collier County after their mother was found dead. The panther is healthy and has grown to a size that should prepare him for life in the wild. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
WEST PALM BEACH, FL - APRIL 03: A 2-year-old Florida panther is released into the wild by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) on April 3, 2013 in West Palm Beach, Florida. The panther and its sister had been raised at the White Oak Conservation Center since they were 5 months old. The FWC rescued the two panthers as kittens in September 2011 in northern Collier County after their mother was found dead. The panther is healthy and has grown to a size that should prepare him for life in the wild. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

The Miami Herald says that Leon spotted the python, then grabbed it and shot it in the head. 

He told local news that the python’s voracious appetite is hurting the wildlife population, eating "pretty much everything out there."

Hunters for the elimination group get paid $8.10 an hour, but also get $50 for a 4-foot snake and $25 for each additional foot. 

This snake will reportedly fetch Leon and the two other hunters $375.

Read Full Story