It looks like North Korea doctored the pictures of its latest missile launch

  • North Korea appears to have doctored photos from its latest missile launch.
  • The launch demonstrated North Korea's most capable-ever missile, but they're known to exaggerate.
  • Always take North Korean media with a grain of salt.

North Korea is no stranger to stretching the truth in its official media releases, but analysts with keen eyes have picked up on what looks like their latest act of fakery.

Marco Langbroek, an archaeologist by trade and a space expert who tracks North Korea's missile program, picked up on an issue with pictures of the country's Hwasong-15 intercontinental ballistic missile launching on November 29.

Essentially, North Korea's claims about the source of their images don't match with the stars visible in the pictures. Langbroek suggested the images may have been composites, because they picture star constellations that should not appear next to each other.

"You should see constellations that are opposites in the sky. That is not the case," Langbroek told CNN.

RELATED: North Korea's November 2017 missile launch

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North Korea's November 2017 missile launch
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North Korea's November 2017 missile launch
A man looks at a street monitor showing a news report about North Korea's missile launch, in Tokyo, Japan, November 29, 2017. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
EAST COAST, SOUTH KOREA - NOVEMBER 29: In this handout photo released by the South Korean Defense Ministry, South Korea's missile system firing Hyunmu-2 missiles into the East Sea during a missile drill aimed to counter North Korea's missile test on November 29, 2017 in Seoul, South Korea. In spite of US President Trump's warnings, North Korea fired an intercontinental ballistic missile early today for the first time in four months. The Pentagon has said that the missile had flown for about 1,000km (620 miles) before falling into the Sea of Japan. (Photo by South Korean Defense Ministry via Getty Images)
A man looks at a street monitor showing a news report about North Korea's missile launch, in Tokyo, Japan, November 29, 2017. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
People watch a television broadcast of a news report on North Korea firing what appeared to be an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) that landed close to Japan, in Seoul, South Korea, November 29, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
A woman walks past a street monitor showing North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un in a news report about North Korea's missile launch, in Tokyo, Japan, November 29, 2017. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
A woman walks past a street monitor showing a news report about North Korea's missile launch, in Tokyo, Japan, November 29, 2017. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
A man walks past a street monitor showing North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un in a news report about North Korea's missile launch, in Tokyo, Japan, November 29, 2017. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
A woman walks past a television broadcast of a news report on North Korea firing what appeared to be an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) that landed close to Japan, in Seoul, South Korea, November 29, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
EAST COAST, SOUTH KOREA - NOVEMBER 29: In this handout photo released by the South Korean Defense Ministry, South Korea's missile system firing Hyunmu-2 missiles into the East Sea during a missile drill aimed to counter North Korea's missile test on November 29, 2017 in Seoul, South Korea. In spite of US President Trump's warnings, North Korea fired an intercontinental ballistic missile early today for the first time in four months. The Pentagon has said that the missile had flown for about 1,000km (620 miles) before falling into the Sea of Japan. (Photo by South Korean Defense Ministry via Getty Images)
EAST COAST, SOUTH KOREA - NOVEMBER 29: In this handout photo released by the South Korean Defense Ministry, South Korea's missile system firing Hyunmu-2 missiles into the East Sea during a missile drill aimed to counter North Korea's missile test on November 29, 2017 in Seoul, South Korea. In spite of US President Trump's warnings, North Korea fired an intercontinental ballistic missile early today for the first time in four months. The Pentagon has said that the missile had flown for about 1,000km (620 miles) before falling into the Sea of Japan. (Photo by South Korean Defense Ministry via Getty Images)
A man walks past a television screen showing a file video footage of North Korea's missile launch, at a railway station in Seoul on November 29, 2017. North Korea test fired what appeared to be an intercontinental ballistic missile on November 29, in a major challenge to US President Donald Trump after he slapped fresh sanctions on Pyongyang and declared it a state sponsor of terrorism. / AFP PHOTO / JUNG Yeon-Je (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)
A pedestrian walks in front of a television screen displaying file news footage of a North Korean missile launch, in Tokyo on November 29, 2017, following a new missile launch. Japan's prime minister said on November 29 that the latest North Korean missile launch was a 'violent act' that 'can never be tolerated' after the ICBM splashed down in its exclusive economic zone (EEZ). / AFP PHOTO / KAZUHIRO NOGI (Photo credit should read KAZUHIRO NOGI/AFP/Getty Images)
EAST SEA, SOUTH KOREA - NOVEMBER 29: In this handout image provided by South Korean Defense Ministry, South Korean Navy destroyer launching a missile during a exercise on November 29, 2017 in East Sea, South Korea. In spite of US President Trump's warnings, North Korea fired an intercontinental ballistic missile early today for the first time in four months. The Pentagon has said that the missile had flown for about 1,000km (620 miles) before falling into the Sea of Japan. (Photo by South Korean Defense Ministry via Getty Images)
A pedestrian walks in front of a television screen displaying a map of Japan (R) and the Korean Peninsula in Tokyo on November 29, 2017, following a North Korean missile launch. Japan's prime minister said on November 29 that the latest North Korean missile launch was a 'violent act' that 'can never be tolerated' after the ICBM splashed down in its exclusive economic zone (EEZ). / AFP PHOTO / KAZUHIRO NOGI (Photo credit should read KAZUHIRO NOGI/AFP/Getty Images)
EAST COAST, SOUTH KOREA - NOVEMBER 29: In this handout photo released by the South Korean Defense Ministry, South Korea's missile system firing Hyunmu-2 missiles into the East Sea during a missile drill aimed to counter North Korea's missile test on November 29, 2017 in Seoul, South Korea. In spite of US President Trump's warnings, North Korea fired an intercontinental ballistic missile early today for the first time in four months. The Pentagon has said that the missile had flown for about 1,000km (620 miles) before falling into the Sea of Japan. (Photo by South Korean Defense Ministry via Getty Images)
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Jonathan McDowell, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, pointed out to CNN that the stars in the photo looked too clear for a picture capturing a missile's rapid ascent.

"They looked so crisp, that just didn't seem right to me," McDowell said.

Additionally, Trey Menefee, a photographer and open-source imagery analyst, found irregularities in the images that indicate doctoring.

North Korea's latest image drop also took longer than usual.

It's unclear if the changes in photography reflect any substantive changes, like making the rocket appear bigger and more capable than it really is.

However, the doctored photos again reinforce the need to take all media from North Korea with a grain of salt.

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