North Korea says the US is 'begging for nuclear war' as stealth fighters begin training on the peninsula

  • North Korea's Foreign Ministry said the US has "nuclear war mania," in a statement read on state TV on the weekend. 
  • The statement came as US stealth fighters moved onto the Korean Peninsula for a US-South Korea aerial drill, the largest in history.
  • The air exercise, dubbed "Vigilant Ace" began on Monday. 


Tensions escalated along the Korean Peninsula over the weekend as US stealth fighters prepared for a joint military drill with South Korea, and North Korea criticized the US for its "nuclear war mania."

North Korea made several statements about actions taken by the US over the weekend. 

North Korea's Foreign Ministry said in a statement read on state TV that President Donald Trump and his administration are "begging for nuclear war" by engaging in what the statement referred to as an "extremely dangerous nuclear gamble," reported CNN

The statement also said that if the Korean peninsula and the world were to be pushed to nuclear war, the US would be "fully responsible" because of its "reckless nuclear war mania." 

RELATED: North Korea's November 2017 missile launch

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North Korea's November 2017 missile launch
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North Korea's November 2017 missile launch
A man looks at a street monitor showing a news report about North Korea's missile launch, in Tokyo, Japan, November 29, 2017. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
EAST COAST, SOUTH KOREA - NOVEMBER 29: In this handout photo released by the South Korean Defense Ministry, South Korea's missile system firing Hyunmu-2 missiles into the East Sea during a missile drill aimed to counter North Korea's missile test on November 29, 2017 in Seoul, South Korea. In spite of US President Trump's warnings, North Korea fired an intercontinental ballistic missile early today for the first time in four months. The Pentagon has said that the missile had flown for about 1,000km (620 miles) before falling into the Sea of Japan. (Photo by South Korean Defense Ministry via Getty Images)
A man looks at a street monitor showing a news report about North Korea's missile launch, in Tokyo, Japan, November 29, 2017. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
People watch a television broadcast of a news report on North Korea firing what appeared to be an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) that landed close to Japan, in Seoul, South Korea, November 29, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
A woman walks past a street monitor showing North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un in a news report about North Korea's missile launch, in Tokyo, Japan, November 29, 2017. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
A woman walks past a street monitor showing a news report about North Korea's missile launch, in Tokyo, Japan, November 29, 2017. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
A man walks past a street monitor showing North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un in a news report about North Korea's missile launch, in Tokyo, Japan, November 29, 2017. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
A woman walks past a television broadcast of a news report on North Korea firing what appeared to be an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) that landed close to Japan, in Seoul, South Korea, November 29, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
EAST COAST, SOUTH KOREA - NOVEMBER 29: In this handout photo released by the South Korean Defense Ministry, South Korea's missile system firing Hyunmu-2 missiles into the East Sea during a missile drill aimed to counter North Korea's missile test on November 29, 2017 in Seoul, South Korea. In spite of US President Trump's warnings, North Korea fired an intercontinental ballistic missile early today for the first time in four months. The Pentagon has said that the missile had flown for about 1,000km (620 miles) before falling into the Sea of Japan. (Photo by South Korean Defense Ministry via Getty Images)
EAST COAST, SOUTH KOREA - NOVEMBER 29: In this handout photo released by the South Korean Defense Ministry, South Korea's missile system firing Hyunmu-2 missiles into the East Sea during a missile drill aimed to counter North Korea's missile test on November 29, 2017 in Seoul, South Korea. In spite of US President Trump's warnings, North Korea fired an intercontinental ballistic missile early today for the first time in four months. The Pentagon has said that the missile had flown for about 1,000km (620 miles) before falling into the Sea of Japan. (Photo by South Korean Defense Ministry via Getty Images)
A man walks past a television screen showing a file video footage of North Korea's missile launch, at a railway station in Seoul on November 29, 2017. North Korea test fired what appeared to be an intercontinental ballistic missile on November 29, in a major challenge to US President Donald Trump after he slapped fresh sanctions on Pyongyang and declared it a state sponsor of terrorism. / AFP PHOTO / JUNG Yeon-Je (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)
A pedestrian walks in front of a television screen displaying file news footage of a North Korean missile launch, in Tokyo on November 29, 2017, following a new missile launch. Japan's prime minister said on November 29 that the latest North Korean missile launch was a 'violent act' that 'can never be tolerated' after the ICBM splashed down in its exclusive economic zone (EEZ). / AFP PHOTO / KAZUHIRO NOGI (Photo credit should read KAZUHIRO NOGI/AFP/Getty Images)
EAST SEA, SOUTH KOREA - NOVEMBER 29: In this handout image provided by South Korean Defense Ministry, South Korean Navy destroyer launching a missile during a exercise on November 29, 2017 in East Sea, South Korea. In spite of US President Trump's warnings, North Korea fired an intercontinental ballistic missile early today for the first time in four months. The Pentagon has said that the missile had flown for about 1,000km (620 miles) before falling into the Sea of Japan. (Photo by South Korean Defense Ministry via Getty Images)
A pedestrian walks in front of a television screen displaying a map of Japan (R) and the Korean Peninsula in Tokyo on November 29, 2017, following a North Korean missile launch. Japan's prime minister said on November 29 that the latest North Korean missile launch was a 'violent act' that 'can never be tolerated' after the ICBM splashed down in its exclusive economic zone (EEZ). / AFP PHOTO / KAZUHIRO NOGI (Photo credit should read KAZUHIRO NOGI/AFP/Getty Images)
EAST COAST, SOUTH KOREA - NOVEMBER 29: In this handout photo released by the South Korean Defense Ministry, South Korea's missile system firing Hyunmu-2 missiles into the East Sea during a missile drill aimed to counter North Korea's missile test on November 29, 2017 in Seoul, South Korea. In spite of US President Trump's warnings, North Korea fired an intercontinental ballistic missile early today for the first time in four months. The Pentagon has said that the missile had flown for about 1,000km (620 miles) before falling into the Sea of Japan. (Photo by South Korean Defense Ministry via Getty Images)
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Then on Sunday, commentary run by state TV called this week's US-South Korea joint air exercises are a "dangerous provocation" pushing the region "to the brink of a nuclear war," according to CNN. North Korean media regularly threatens the US and its allies and blames the US for tensions on the peninsula.

The US and its ally South Korea began their largest cooperative air exercise in history, dubbed "Vigilant Ace," on Monday

The US Air Force said in a statement that F-22 and F-35 stealth jets had moved into South Korea over the weekend in preparation for the joint drill. Around 230 aircraft and 12,000 US personnel are be participating in the week-long exercise which will include more stealth jets than ever before.

According to the US Air Force, the move is designed to boost the "combat effectiveness" of the alliance.

White House national security adviser HR McMaster said on Saturday that the chances for nuclear war on the peninsula are continuing to grow, CNN reported

"I think it's increasing every day, which means that we are in a race, really, we are in a race to be able to solve this problem," McMaster said in a conference in California, when asked whether North Korea's intercontinental ballistic missile launch last week had increased the chance of war. 

McMaster also said that North Korea represents the "the greatest immediate threat to the United States."

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