Mitt Romney unloads on Roy Moore the same day Trump endorses him, says he would be a 'stain on the GOP'

  • Mitt Romney issued one of the harshest rebukes of Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore by a prominent Republican. 
  • Romney, who is reportedly considering a Utah Senate bid, said electing Moore would "stain" the GOP and the nation. 
  • Moore, who is facing multiple allegations of sexual misconduct with teenagers, fired back, arguing that Romney "has lost his courage" or "doesn’t care about truth anymore." 

Mitt Romney, the former Massachusetts governor and Republican presidential nominee, issued one of the harshest rebukes by a prominent Republican of Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore, who is facing multiple allegations of sexual misconduct with teenagers. 

"Roy Moore in the US Senate would be a stain on the GOP and on the nation. Leigh Corfman and other victims are courageous heroes," he wrote. "No vote, no majority is worth losing our honor, our integrity."

Moore fired back at Romney minutes later, suggesting that the former GOP standard-bearer is a member of the elite and should be purged from the party. 

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Women who have accused Roy Moore of sexual assault
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Women who have accused Roy Moore of sexual assault
Beverly Nelson (L) shows a school year book with attorney Gloria Allread during a news conference announcing new allegations of sexual misconduct against Alabama Republican congressional candidate Roy Moore, in New York, November 13, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Gloria Deason
Wendy Miller
Gloria Deason
Wendy Miller
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Accuser Beverly Young Nelson, reacts while reading a statement claiming that Alabama senate candidate Roy Moore sexually harassed her when she was 16, in New York, U.S., November 13, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Attorney Gloria Allred stands with accuser Beverly Young Nelson, holding a sketch of herself made when she was 16 after reading a statement claiming that Alabama senate candidate Roy Moore sexually harassed her when she was 16, in New York, U.S., November 13, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Beverly Nelson (L) reacts as she reads a statement to reporters with attorney Gloria Allred during a news conference announcing new allegations of sexual misconduct against Alabama Republican congressional candidate Roy Moore, in New York, November 13, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 13: Beverly Young Nelson (L) speaks to the media with her lawyer Gloria Allred, at a news conference where she has accused Alabama Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore of sexually abusing her when she was 16 on November 13, 2017 in New York City. Moore, a controversial politician who recently won a run-off against Luther Strange for Alabama's Senate seat, is currently fighting accusations alleging that he pursued sexual relationships with teenagers -- including a 14-year-old -- when he was in his 30s. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
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"Either @MittRomney has lost his courage or he doesn’t care about truth anymore. Sad day! America’s reawakening was led by @realDonaldTrump, not you Mitt. #DefeatTheElite #DrainTheSwamp," Moore wrote.

Romney, who is reportedly considering a Utah Senate bid, also spoke out against Moore last month

"Innocent until proven guilty is for criminal convictions, not elections. I believe Leigh Corfman. Her account is too serious to ignore. Moore is unfit for office and should step aside," Romney tweeted.

Romney's statement came just hours after President Donald Trump officially endorsed Moore.  

"Democrats refusal to give even one vote for massive Tax Cuts is why we need Republican Roy Moore to win in Alabama," he tweeted. "We need his vote on stopping crime, illegal immigration, Border Wall, Military, Pro Life, V.A., Judges 2nd Amendment and more."

Moore broadcasted the president's endorsement on Monday afternoon, claiming Trump gave him his "full support."

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Donald Trump and Mitt Romney meet
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Donald Trump and Mitt Romney meet
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 29: (L to R) President-elect Donald Trump and Mitt Romney dine at Jean Georges restaurant, November 29, 2016 in New York City. President-elect Donald Trump and his transition team are in the process of filling cabinet and other high level positions for the new administration. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney speaks after a dinner meeting with U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at Jean-Georges inside of the Trump International Hotel & Tower in New York, U.S., November 29, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 29: (L to R) President-elect Donald Trump and Mitt Romney dine at Jean Georges restaurant, November 29, 2016 in New York City. President-elect Donald Trump and his transition team are in the process of filling cabinet and other high level positions for the new administration. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
US President-elect Donald Trump (L) dines with Mitt Romney (R) at Jean-Georges restaurant at Trump International Hotel and Tower, Tuesday, November 29, 2016 in New York. Romney, a favorite among establishment Republicans for being named Secretary of State, met with Trump for their second face-to-face meeting in 10 days. / AFP / Bryan R. Smith (Photo credit should read BRYAN R. SMITH/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President-elect Donald Trump sits at a table for dinner with former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney (R) and his choice for White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus (L) at Jean-Georges at the Trump International Hotel & Tower in New York, U.S., November 29, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
U.S. President-elect Donald Trump sits at a table for dinner with former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney (R) and his choice for White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus (L) at Jean-Georges at the Trump International Hotel & Tower in New York, U.S., November 29, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
U.S. President-elect Donald Trump sits at a table for dinner with former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney (R) and his choice for White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus (L) at Jean-Georges at the Trump International Hotel & Tower in New York, U.S., November 29, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
U.S. President-elect Donald Trump sits at a table for dinner with former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney (R) at Jean-Georges inside of the Trump International Hotel & Tower in New York, U.S., November 29, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney speaks after a dinner meeting with U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at Jean-Georges inside of the Trump International Hotel & Tower in New York, U.S., November 29, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
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"'Go get 'em, Roy!' - President Trump," he wrote. "Just got off the phone with President Trump who offered his full support and said he needs a fighter to help him in the US Senate. I look forward to fighting alongside the President to #MAGA!"

Moore has enjoyed continued support from Steve Bannon, Trump's former top White House strategist, who is helping recruit and support far-right candidates in the 2018 midterm elections. 

Other Republican leaders, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, have appeared to reverse course over whether Moore should drop out of the Senate race. Despite calling for the GOP nominee to step aside last month, saying that he believed the women's stories, McConnell refused to say on Sunday whether Moore belonged in the Senate. 

"I'm going to let the people of Alabama make the call," McConnell said. "The election's been going on a long time, there's been a lot of discussion about it. They're going to make the decision a week from Tuesday."

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See Also:

SEE ALSO: Trump tweets to vote for Roy Moore or risk hurting 'our great Republican agenda'

SEE ALSO: Mitch McConnell reverses call for Roy Moore to drop out of Alabama Senate race

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