'Evil twin' who plotted to kill sister may soon be released

A woman in California, who police dubbed the "evil twin" after she plotted to kill her sister, may be released from prison soon.

Jeen Han, from South Korea, has spent the past 19 years at the Central California Women's Facility in Chowchilla after she was convicted in the 1996 attack on her identical twin sister, Sunny Han.

After nearly two decades behind bars, Han may soon be a free woman.

See photos from the case: 

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'Evil twin' Jeen Han, who plotted to murder sister, may soon be released from prison
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'Evil twin' Jeen Han, who plotted to murder sister, may soon be released from prison
Jeen Han arrives in Orange County Superior Court in handcuffs November 3 in Santa Ana, where she is charged with conspiring to kill her twin sister Sunny. A prosecutor in the so-called "Good twin; Evil twin" trial said November 6 that Jeen Han wanted revenge against the sibling she blamed for having her jailed. TWINS
Jeen Han, who is accused of conspiracy to murder her twin sister Sunny, enters court on November 10 during a hearing to determine if the defense may access Sunny Han's medical records following her overdose on sleeping pills November 4. The "Good Twin-Evil Twin" case took a spin when Sunny Han was unable to testify after swallowing 30 sleeping pills following a fight with her boyfriend. CRIME TWINS
Sunny Han is supported by helping hands in Orange County Superior Court November 4 in Santa Ana after she arrived late to testify against her twin sister, Jeen, who is accused of plotting to kill her. A prosecutor in the so-called "Good twin; Evil twin" trial said on November 6 that Jeen Han wanted revenge against the sibling she blamed for having her jailed. TWINS
Sunny Han, whose twin sister Jeen is accused of plotting her murder, sits on the stand in court November 10 during a hearing to determine if the defence may access her medical records following her overdose on sleeping pills on November 4. The "Good Twin-Evil Twin" case took a spin when Sunny Han was unable to testify after swallowing 30 sleeping pills following a fight with her boyfriend. CRIME TWINS
Judge Eileen C. Moore, Orange County Superior Court, Santa Ana, looks at a booking photo of Archie Bryant, November 6, one of three defendants in the case of Jeen Han who is accused of plotting to kill her twin sister Sunny Han. Jeen Han and two 17-year-olds, John Sayarth and Archie Bryant, are charged with conspiracy to murder Sunny Han. If convicted, they face 25 years to life in prison. Authorities at first suggested Jeen, 23, wanted to kill her sister to assume her identity. But during a preliminary hearing in March, a picture of sibling rivalry emerged. TWINS
Jeen Han (R) breaks down in court in front of her attorney Roger Alexander (L) after being found guilty of conspiracy to committ murder on her twin sister Sunny, November 20 in Santa Ana,California. Han faces a sentence of 45 years to life for conspiracy charges, as well as burglary and committing a felony with a gun. CRIME TWINS
John Sararath (L) and Archie Bryant hang their heads after being found guilty of conspiracy to commit murder on Sunny Han in the "Evil Twin" trial, November 20 in Santa Ana,California. "Evil Twin" Jeen Han faces 45 years to life for conspiracy charges, as well as burglary and committing a felony with a gun. CRIME TWINS
Jeen Han, 24, convicted of plotting with two teen-agers to kill her identical twin sister was sentenced on May 8 to 26 years in prison. Han, shown in file photo, was found guilty last November of plotting to kill her twin sister Sunny. The jury also found her guilty of two counts of burglary, firearms possession and two counts of false imprisonment. VM/WS
Sunny Han, 22, leaves Harbor Municipal Court for a break after giving testimony in the case against her twin sister Jeen Young Han. Jeen Young Han faces charges of attempted murder. (Photo by Rick Loomis/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
Jeen Young Han is photographed at her arraignment at Harbor Municipal Court in Newport Beach on charges she conspired to kill her twin sister. TIMES (Photo by Robert Lachman/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
Sunny Han, 22, pauses to speak with a reporter after a break in court at Harbor Municipal Court where her twin sister Jeen Young Han faces charges of attempted murder. Sunny Han had given testimony during the morning court session. (Photo by Rick Loomis/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
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According to the Los Angeles Times, the state's Board of Parole recommended the now 43-year-old be released.

Under California law, Gov. Jerry Brown will decide whether to uphold the parole or reject it.

The Orange County District Attorney's Office is hoping Brown denies Han parole, the Orange County Register reports, claiming she has not addressed her mental health issues and is still a risk to the public.

Deputy District Attorney Nikki Chambers said in a letter to Brown that Han is manipulative and has received letters from several men offering her money, a job and a place to stay if she's released. One man in England reportedly sent Han $100,000.

"This manipulative ability is not surprising, given her extreme intelligence coupled with an untreated personality disorder," Chambers wrote. "The fact remains that she is still flexing the manipulation muscles that she used when she recruited two young men to murder her sister."

Han was accused of enlisting the help of 16-year-old Archie Bryant and 15-year-old John Sayarath to murder her sister, with whom she had a strained relationship.

The two teens posed as magazine salesmen to gain entry into Sunny's Irvine apartment. When Sunny heard her roommate, Helen Kim, struggling with the men, she called 911.

Bryant and Sayarath bound and gagged the women before police arrived minutes later.

Han and the teens were convicted of conspiracy to commit murder. Han was sentenced to 26 years in prison. Bryant got 16 years and Sayarath was sentenced to eight.

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