Roy Moore loses a key Republican vote in the Alabama special election

 

  • Alabama Sen. Richard Shelby told reporters on Monday that he did not vote for Roy Moore, the embattled senate candidate facing multiple allegation of sexual misconduct with teen girls.
  • Those misconduct accusations, which allegedly happened while Moore was in his 30s have nearly derailed his election campaign.
  • Moore has largely lost the support of the national Republican Party apparatus, but President Donald Trump the Alabama state GOP are among those who continue to support him.


Sen. Richard Shelby of Alabama said on Monday that he did not vote for Roy Moore, the Republican candidate for an Alabama Senate seat that has become a political and cultural flashpoint in the last few weeks.

"I didn't vote for him," Shelby told reporters on Monday according to The Hill. "I voted for a distinguished Republican write-in."

Shelby said previously that he would "absolutely not" vote for Moore. His words — along with those of Attorney General Jeff Sessions who once occupied the Alabama Senate seat, and the words of Ivanka Trump — were included in a campaign ad for Moore's Democratic challenger, Doug Jones.

RELATED: Women who have accused Roy Moore of sexual assault

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Women who have accused Roy Moore of sexual assault
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Women who have accused Roy Moore of sexual assault
Beverly Nelson (L) shows a school year book with attorney Gloria Allread during a news conference announcing new allegations of sexual misconduct against Alabama Republican congressional candidate Roy Moore, in New York, November 13, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
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Gloria Deason
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Gloria Deason
Accuser Beverly Young Nelson, reacts while reading a statement claiming that Alabama senate candidate Roy Moore sexually harassed her when she was 16, in New York, U.S., November 13, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Attorney Gloria Allred stands with accuser Beverly Young Nelson, holding a sketch of herself made when she was 16 after reading a statement claiming that Alabama senate candidate Roy Moore sexually harassed her when she was 16, in New York, U.S., November 13, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Beverly Nelson (L) reacts as she reads a statement to reporters with attorney Gloria Allred during a news conference announcing new allegations of sexual misconduct against Alabama Republican congressional candidate Roy Moore, in New York, November 13, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 13: Beverly Young Nelson (L) speaks to the media with her lawyer Gloria Allred, at a news conference where she has accused Alabama Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore of sexually abusing her when she was 16 on November 13, 2017 in New York City. Moore, a controversial politician who recently won a run-off against Luther Strange for Alabama's Senate seat, is currently fighting accusations alleging that he pursued sexual relationships with teenagers -- including a 14-year-old -- when he was in his 30s. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
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Moore is accused of engaging in sexual misconduct with teen girls when he was in his 30s. Though he has denied the claims, the multiple allegations have thrown a wrench into his election campaign. Moore has largely lost the backing of the national Republican Party fundraising apparatus. He has faced — and rejected — calls to drop out of the race. His communications director quit the campaign last week.

Despite that, President Donald Trump has endorsed Moore, citing his interest in securing the votes needed to bring the party's tax bill over the finish line. The Alabama state GOP also said it would stand behind MooreHe has lost some support since the sexual harassment allegations surfaced, but that has not stopped some Republican Party officials from considering drastic measures should Moore win the Alabama special election on December 12.

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