Brutal images show how the Rohingya people are being slaughtered and forced to flee Myanmar

They've been called "the most persecuted minority in the world."

Subjected to rape, killings, and the destruction of their villages, more than 600,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled to Bangladesh from Myanmar since August.

“The situation seems a textbook example of ethnic cleansing,” Zeid Ra‘ad al-Hussein, the chief of the UN's Human Rights Council, said in September.

The Rohingya, who live in Rakhine state in Buddhist-dominated Myanmar, have been in the country since the 8th century. But the government considers them illegal immigrants, not citizens. A recent Amnesty International report even labeled their treatment as apartheid.

While they've faced such persecution for decades, the Rohingya's situation dramatically worsened in August, when the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army — a Rohingya insurgent group — attacked a police post and killed more than 10 officers.

Since then, the Myanmar army has destroyed more than 288 Rohingya villages, raped and killed the residents, and sent others fleeing to Bangladesh.

But Myanmar denies the allegations, insisting that it is fighting terrorism and that the Rohingya are burning down their own villages.

The following images show what the Rohingya are going through:

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Rohingya people being slaughtered
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Rohingya people being slaughtered
A Rohingya refugee boy is weighed at the emergency nutrition treatment center in Balu Khali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, November 8, 2017. Picture taken November 8, 2017. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar TEMPLATE OUT
Fire billows above what is believed to be a burning village in Myanmar's Rakhine state picture taken in Shah Porir Dip island, Teknaf, Bangladesh 14 September 2017. According to United Nations more than 300 thousand Rohingya refugees have fled Myanmar from violence over the last few weeks, most trying to cross the border and reach Bangladesh. International organizations have reported claims of human rights violations and summary executions allegedly carried out by the Myanmar army. (Photo by KM Asad/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
Pointing with finger, a Rohingya refugee is showing smoke on Myanmar's side of border as Myanmar military sets fire on his village. Shahpirer Dip, Teknaf, Bangladesh; September 14, 2017. Bangladesh will use troops to deliver foreign aid to the border town that has been overwhelmed by Rohingya Muslim refugees from Myanmar, authorities announced late September 14. The move follows criticism of the chaotic conditions in which relief supplies have been handed out at the huge camps around Cox's Bazar, where about 389,000 Rohingya from Myanmar's Rakhine state have arrived since August 25. (Photo by Turjoy Chowdhury/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - In this photograph taken on September 7, 2017, unidentified men carry knives and slingshots as they walk past a burning house in Gawdu Tharya village near Maungdaw in Rakhine state in northern Myanmar. The men were seen by journalists walking past the burning structure during a Myanmar government sponsored trip for media to the region. In the last two weeks alone 164,000 mostly Rohingya civilians have fled to Bangladesh, overwhelming refugee camps that were already bursting at the seams and scores more have died trying to flee the fighting in Myanmar's Rakhine state, where witnesses say entire villages have been burned since Rohingya militants launched a series of coordinated attacks on August 25, prompting a military-led crackdown. / AFP PHOTO / STR (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
In this photograph taken on September 7, 2017, a house is consumed by fire in Gawdu Tharya village near Maungdaw in Rakhine state in northern Myanmar. The wooden structure on fire was seen by journalists during a Myanmar government sponsored trip for media to the region. In the last two weeks alone 164,000 mostly Rohingya civilians have fled to Bangladesh, overwhelming refugee camps that were already bursting at the seams and scores more have died trying to flee the fighting in Myanmar's Rakhine state, where witnesses say entire villages have been burned since Rohingya militants launched a series of coordinated attacks on August 25, prompting a military-led crackdown. / AFP PHOTO / STR (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
Broken dishes can be seen in the burned out remains of a house in Myo Thu Gyi Muslim village where houses were burnt to the ground near Maungdaw town in northern Rakhine State on August 31, 2017. At least 18,500 Rohingya have fled their homes following attacks by militants on August 25 in Rakhine State and a crackdown by security forces who have torched villages and targeted civilians, according to witness accounts. / AFP PHOTO / STR (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
Ethnic Mro families who fled their village because of unrest stand in the entrance of a temporary shelter in a village near Maungdaw town in northern Rakhine State on August 31, 2017. At least 18,500 Rohingya have fled their homes following attacks by militants on August 25 in Rakhine State and a crackdown by security forces who have torched villages and targeted civilians, according to witness accounts. / AFP PHOTO / STR (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
COX'S BAZAR, BANGLADESH - SEPTEMBER 21: 11 year old Manzur Ali's drawing is seen at a CODEC and UNICEF 'child friendly space' on September 21, 2017 in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. His drawing depicts a scene that he witnessed while fleeing his village; his neighbor's house burning, the military telling people to come outside then shooting them, a woman hiding under a mango tree having her throat slit, a man who's intestines came out after he was shot, and his uncle being shot in the throat. Over 230,000 child refugees have fled into Bangladesh since late August during the outbreak of violence in Rakhine state and are now in urgent need of help, according to Unicef. With children making up around 60 percent of the 420,000 Rohingya that have fled into Bangladesh, many below 18 years old arrived into the makeshift tents highly traumatized after seeing family members killed and homes set on fire. Aid agencies like Unicef are offering counseling for Rohingya children and set up spaces for them to play and relax as they have so far counted more than 1,400 children who have crossed the border with neither parent and many are displaying signs of trauma, such as shaking and the inability to interact with other people. The Rohingya refugee crisis has been reported as the worst in decades while aid agency, Save the Children, warns that over 600,000 Rohingya children could be in Bangladesh by the end of the year with many of them probably being orphans. (Photo by Allison Joyce/Getty Images)
COX'S BAZAR, BANGLADESH - SEPTEMBER 21: 11 year old Manzur Ali's drawing is seen at a CODEC and UNICEF 'child friendly space' on September 21, 2017 in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. Manzur Ali came to Bangladesh 15 days ago from Boulibazar in Myanmar. His drawing depicts a scene that he witnessed while fleeing his village; the military strangling his neighbor to death, shooting people, burning people alive, burning houses and shooting people who tried to flee. Over 230,000 child refugees have fled into Bangladesh since late August during the outbreak of violence in Rakhine state and are now in urgent need of help, according to Unicef. With children making up around 60 percent of the 420,000 Rohingya that have fled into Bangladesh, many below 18 years old arrived into the makeshift tents highly traumatized after seeing family members killed and homes set on fire. Aid agencies like Unicef are offering counseling for Rohingya children and set up spaces for them to play and relax as they have so far counted more than 1,400 children who have crossed the border with neither parent and many are displaying signs of trauma, such as shaking and the inability to interact with other people. The Rohingya refugee crisis has been reported as the worst in decades while aid agency, Save the Children, warns that over 600,000 Rohingya children could be in Bangladesh by the end of the year with many of them probably being orphans. (Photo by Allison Joyce/Getty Images)
In this aerial photograph taken from a helicopter on November 12, 2017, the remains of a small burned out village sits among large unharvested fields near the Maungdaw township in Rakhine state in Myanmar. Torched villages and unharvested paddy fields stretch to the horizon in Myanmar's violence-gutted Rakhine state, where a dwindling number of Muslim Rohingya remain trapped in limbo after a violent military crackdown coursed through the region. A rare military-organised trip for foreign media by helicopter to Maungdaw -- the epicentre of a crisis that exploded in late August -- showed a landscape devoid of people, with blackened patches marking the spots where Rohingya villages once stood. / AFP PHOTO / Phyo Hein KYAW / TO GO WITH Myanmar-Bangladesh-refugee-unrest-economy-agriculture, SCENE by Hla-Hla HTAY (Photo credit should read PHYO HEIN KYAW/AFP/Getty Images)
Rohingya refugee Toyuba Khatun, 60, recovers from a leg amputation at the Norwegian-Finnish Red Cross field hospital at Kutupalong refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, November 22, 2017. Khatun's foot got necrosis after getting injured from days of walking to cross the Myanmar-Bangladesh border. Her husband ended up carrying her on his shoulders but by the time she received medical treatment it was too late to save her foot. REUTERS/Susana Vera
A Rohingya refugee woman carry her child in the Kutupalong refugee camp in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, November 21, 2017. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain
Rohingya refugees Mohamed Heron, 6, and his brother Mohamed Akter, 4, pose for a portrait to show burns on their bodies at Kutupalong refugee camp, near Cox's Bazar in Bangladesh, October 14, 2017. Boys' uncle Mohamed Inus said burns resulted from Myanmar's armed forces firing rockets at their village. Two of their siblings, one seven years old and the other a 10-month-old infant, died in the attack, according to the uncle. Their father was held by the military and has not been heard of since. "These two children survived when our village was fired on with rockets," Inus said. Fleeing along with other villagers who abandoned their scorched homes, the boys reached Bangladesh after a three-day trek. At Kutupalong, they were treated for three weeks for their burns at a Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) clinic. REUTERS/Jorge Silva SEARCH "ROHINGYA INJURIES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Fatema, 40, a Rohingya refugee woman and her her two children sit inside a mosquito net in Palong Khali refugee camp in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, November 15, 2017. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain
Mohammad Shobaik, 12, a Rohingya refugee boy who said he was shot by the military during an attack on his village in Myanmar, shows his wound at Kutupalong refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh November 14, 2017. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Ismot Ara, 7, a sick Rohingya refugee girl sits next to her mother Zannatul Bakiya inside their makeshift shelter at Kutupalong refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh November 12, 2017. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
Bare chest of Ismot Ara, 7, a sick Rohingya refugee girl is pictured as she sits on the doorway of her makeshift shelter at Kutupalong refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh November 12, 2017. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
A Rohingya refugee boy who fled last night from Myanmar by boat, drinks water in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, November 9, 2017. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain
A Rohingya refugee woman who came last night by boat, sits on the roadside with her child while detained by Border Guard Bangladesh (BGB) in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, November 9, 2017. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain
A Rohingya refugee girl is weighed at the emergency nutrition treatment center in Balukhali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh November 8, 2017. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
Mohammed Shoaib, 7, who was shot on his chest before crossing the border from Myanmar in August, shows his injury outside a medical centre after seeing a doctor, at Kutupalong refugee camp near Cox?s Bazar, Bangladesh November 5, 2017. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi
Mohammed Taher, 50, a Rohingya refugee holds his son Mohammed Shoaib, 7, who was shot on his chest before crossing the border from Myanmar in August, as they sit outside a medical centre after seeing a doctor, at Kutupalong refugee camp near Cox?s Bazar, Bangladesh November 5, 2017. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi
Rehana Begum cries as she holds her child while hiding in a house with other relatives in Teknaf June 17, 2012. The group of 7 Rohingya Muslims fled mass burning of houses and violence in Myanmar, setting out in a wooden boat for neighbouring Bangladesh. They were pushed back three times by border guards, but finally made it on their fourth attempt and are now hiding with local villagers to avoid being arrested. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY IMMIGRATION CIVIL UNREST)
ATTENTION EDITORS - VISUALS COVERAGE OF SCENES OF DEATH AND INJURY A dead body floats in the sea near the part of Pauktaw township that was burned in recent violence October 27, 2012. Boatloads of Muslims struggled to reach refugee camps and sought safety on islands and in coastal villages on Saturday as Myanmar tried to put out the fires of a week of sectarian unrest that has shaken its fragile democratic transition. Dozens of rickety wooden vessels packed with the stateless Rohingya Muslims who fled clashes with Buddhists in western Rakhine state had reached land by Saturday after two days at sea, but nine boats were still unaccounted for, according to several Rohingya refugee sources reached by telephone. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun (MYANMAR - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) TEMPLATE OUT
COX'S BAZAR, BANGLADESH - OCTOBER 01: A Rohingya refugee woman is helped from a boat as she arrives exhausted on the Bangladesh side of the Naf River at Shah Porir Dwip after fleeing her village in Myanmar, on October 1, 2017 in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. More than half a million Rohingya refugees have flooded into Bangladesh to flee an offensive by Myanmar's military that the United Nations has called 'a textbook example of ethnic cleansing'. The refugee population is expected to swell further, with thousands more Rohingya Muslims said to be making the perilous journey on foot toward the border, or paying smugglers to take them across by water in wooden boats. Hundreds are known to have died trying to escape, and survivors arrive with horrifying accounts of villages burned, women raped, and scores killed in the 'clearance operations' by Myanmar's army and Buddhist mobs that were sparked by militant attacks on security posts in Rakhine state on August 25, 2017. What the Rohingya refugees flee to is a different kind of suffering in sprawling makeshift camps rife with fears of malnutrition, cholera, and other diseases. Aid organizations are struggling to keep pace with the scale of need and the staggering number of them - an estimated 60 percent - who are children arriving alone. Bangladesh, whose acceptance of the refugees has been praised by humanitarian officials for saving lives, has urged the creation of an internationally-recognized 'safe zone' where refugees can return, though Rohingya Muslims have long been persecuted in predominantly Buddhist Myanmar. World leaders are still debating how to confront the country and its de facto leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, a Nobel Peace Prize laureate who championed democracy, but now appears unable or unwilling to stop the army's brutal crackdown. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
In this picture taken on September 27, 2017, a Hindu woman (C) is treated after she fainted as people mourn the loss of their family members in Ye Baw Kyaw village, Maungdaw in Myanmar's northern Rakhine state. Rohingya militants on September 27 denied the Myanmar army's allegations that they had massacred scores of Hindu villagers, whose bodies soldiers displayed to the press after exhuming them from mass graves in northern Rakhine state. Major clashes between the army and the Muslim insurgents erupted last month, triggering a dire refugee crisis with nearly half a million Rohingya fleeing across the border to Bangladesh. / AFP PHOTO / STR (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
COX'S BAZAR, BANGLADESH - SEPTEMBER 18: A Rohingya refugee family uses a candle for light as they sit in a makeshift shelter on September 18, 2017 on the roadside after fleeing their village in Myanmar in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. More than half a million Rohingya refugees have flooded into Bangladesh to flee an offensive by Myanmar's military that the United Nations has called 'a textbook example of ethnic cleansing'. The refugee population is expected to swell further, with thousands more Rohingya Muslims said to be making the perilous journey on foot toward the border, or paying smugglers to take them across by water in wooden boats. Hundreds are known to have died trying to escape, and survivors arrive with horrifying accounts of villages burned, women raped, and scores killed in the 'clearance operations' by Myanmar's army and Buddhist mobs that were sparked by militant attacks on security posts in Rakhine state on August 25, 2017. What the Rohingya refugees flee to is a different kind of suffering in sprawling makeshift camps rife with fears of malnutrition, cholera, and other diseases. Aid organizations are struggling to keep pace with the scale of need and the staggering number of them - an estimated 60 percent - who are children arriving alone. Bangladesh, whose acceptance of the refugees has been praised by humanitarian officials for saving lives, has urged the creation of an internationally-recognized 'safe zone' where refugees can return, though Rohingya Muslims have long been persecuted in predominantly Buddhist Myanmar. World leaders are still debating how to confront the country and its de facto leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, a Nobel Peace Prize laureate who championed democracy, but now appears unable or unwilling to stop the army's brutal crackdown. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
Hindu women cry near the dead bodies of their family members in YeBawKya village near Maungdaw, north of Myanmar's Rakhine state on September 27, 2017. Myanmar troops are still searching for nearly 50 more Hindu villagers feared slaughtered in Rakhine state, officials said Wednesday, as local leaders identified dozens of corpses unearthed from mass graves this week. The military has blamed the killings on the Muslim Rohingya militants it claims to be targeting in a crackdown that has sent nearly half a million Rohingya refugees fleeing across the border to Bangladesh in one month. / AFP PHOTO / STR (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
An injured Rohingya refugees walks at the Balukhali refugee camp near Gumdhum village in Ukhia on September 26, 2017. The UN has drawn up a contingency plan to feed up to 700,000 Muslim Rohingya refugees from Myanmar after some 480,000 fled to Bangladesh over the past month and arrivals continue. A senior official from the UN's World Food Program (WFP) told AFP they were now prepared to provide massive food and other emergency aid if the influx continues in coming weeks. / AFP PHOTO / DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - Rohingya refugee buils a new makeshift shelter in the refugee camp of Thyangkhali near the Bangladeshi village of Gumdhum, on September 18, 2017. More than 400,000 Rohingya Muslims have now arrived in Bangladesh from their Buddhist dominated homeland to escape violence that the United Nations says could be ethnic cleansing. / AFP PHOTO / DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
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SEE ALSO: 'The most persecuted minority in the world': Here's what you need to know about the Rohingya crisis

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