Trading inside the Rohingya camps

PALONG KHALI, Bangladesh (Reuters) - Mohammad Ayas, a 12-year-old Rohingya refugee in the sprawling Palong Khali camp, is busy hawking piazu, a fried mixture of onions, lentils and spices.

The 150 portions of piazu, made by his mother from the aid package the family received after fleeing violence in Myanmar, sell for 1 taka each, or a little more than 1 U.S. cent.

"I started my trading here with the relief I got," Mohammad told Reuters. "I did not buy anything. I got this relief package five days ago and my mum made this piazu this morning."

16 PHOTOS
Trading inside the Rohingya camps
See Gallery
Trading inside the Rohingya camps
Mohammad Ayas, a 12-year-old Rohingya refugee trader sells piazu at a stall in Palong Khali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, November 3, 2017. The 150 portions of piazu, made by his mother from the aid package the family received after fleeing violence in Myanmar, sell for 1 taka each, or a little more than 1 U.S. cent. "I started my trading here with the relief I got," Mohammad said. "I did not buy anything. I got this relief package five days ago and my mum made this piazu this morning." The price in Palong Khali refugee camp is 1 taka per piece. The price in Palong Khali Bazar is 1 taka per piece. REUTERS/Hannah McKay SEARCH "MCKAY TRADERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY.
Bangladeshi trader Kuillah Miah, 60, weighs shrimp at a stall in Palong Khali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, November 4, 2017. "I started my trading here two days ago, I just sell shrimp and it is 100 taka for 250g," Miah said. "Yesterday I sold all my shrimp in a short time and today it will also all sell quickly." The price of shrimp in Palong Khali refugee camp is 100 taka per 250g. The price in Palong Khali Bazar is 80 taka per 250g. REUTERS/Hannah McKay SEARCH "MCKAY TRADERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Faruk, 17, a Rohingya refugee trader holds betel leaves which are on sale at a stall in Palong Khali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, November 3, 2017. He left his village in Myanmar when the military opened fire towards the Rohingya. "I buy this betel leaf from Palong Khali market, in one bundle there are 160 pieces, I buy it for 80 taka and I sell it for 100 taka. Bangladeshi's and I sell for the same rate in the camp. Outside in the local market it is 80 taka per bundle. My problem is that I don't have money so I can't buy anything to eat, I can't buy fish to eat," he said. REUTERS/Hannah McKay SEARCH "MCKAY TRADERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A dead chicken is seen on the floor of a chicken shop in Palong Khali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, October 29, 2017. Rohingya refugee Abul Talek, 65, bought the chicken for one of his sick children. "I bought this chicken for 150 taka. I think the price is too much for me, a few days ago it was 130 taka and now it has increased 20 taka. I can't go out of the camp to buy chicken, thats why I bought it from here," he said. The price in Palong Khali refugee camp is 150 taka per chicken. The price in Palong Khali Bazar is 120 taka per chicken. REUTERS/Hannah McKay SEARCH "MCKAY TRADERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY.
Rohingya refugee and trader Abul Fayaj, 50, weighs green chillies at a stall in Palong Khali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, October 29, 2017. He said a Bangladeshi lent him money for the chillies, which he sells for 200 taka ($2.39) per kg, higher than the local market price of 130 taka per kg. "I don't have the money to take lots of food, that's why I have to take a loan," he said. "I have to pay more to the lender who gave me the money to buy the vegetables, so there is only a small profit," said Fayaj, adding he takes home 100 taka a day. REUTERS/Hannah McKay SEARCH "MCKAY TRADERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Khala Miah, a Bangladeshi trader sells plums at a stall in Palong Khali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, November 3, 2017. "I started my trading at an early age, I have been working in the camp for one month. I sell plum and plum powder, one pot is 10 taka. I buy the plum 1Kg for 50 taka and sell for 80 taka. Refugees tell me that they are very expensive, even though they tell me this, they still buy it." The price in Palong Khali refugee camp is 10 taka per pot. The price in Palong Khali Bazar is 5 taka per Kg. REUTERS/Hannah McKay SEARCH "MCKAY TRADERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Femipil and other medicines are displayed for sale in a pharmacy in Palong Khali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, October 30, 2017. Bangladeshi trader Mohammed Yusuf, 18, started trading three days ago. He sells Femipil at 18 taka per packet. "My prices are similar to that of all over Bangladesh. I just sell products which have fixed prices on them. Rohingya refugees don't know the price of medicine, most of them are uneducated thats why they are saying the prices are too high for them," he said. REUTERS/Hannah McKay SEARCH "MCKAY TRADERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A Rohingya refugee boy, the son of Obaidul Mannan, weighs ginger powder at a stall in Palong Khali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, November 3, 2017. "The problem I� facing here is that I'm selling next door to traders who are also selling the same items," he said. The price for chilli and ginger powder in Palong Khali refugee camp is 30 taka per 250g. The price in Palong Khali Bazar is 27.5 taka per 250g. REUTERS/Hannah McKay SEARCH "MCKAY TRADERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Rohingya refugee Obaidul Mannan, 40, sells betel nut at a stall in Palong Khali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, November 3, 2017. He bought it with 9 grams (0.3 ounces) of gold that belonged to his wife. His complaints are common to shopkeepers everywhere. "The problem I� facing here is that I'm selling next door to traders who are also selling the same items," he said. The price of betel nut inside Palong Khali refugee camp is 25 taka per 50g. The price in Palong Khali Bazar is 17 taka per 50g. REUTERS/Hannah McKay SEARCH "MCKAY TRADERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Healthcare products are displayed for sale in a shop in Palong Khali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, October 24, 2017. Bangladeshi trader Mohammed Absar, 20, has been trading for two months in the camp. "I sell cakes, biscuits, and many other things," he said. "I buy from the wholesaler who comes into the camp so I can buy it cheaper." The price in Palong Khali refugee camp is 15 taka per toothbrush. The price in Palong Khali Bazar is 7.5 taka per toothbrush. REUTERS/Hannah McKay SEARCH "MCKAY TRADERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Cigarettes are displayed for sale at a stall in Palong Khali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, October 29, 2017. Rohingya refugee trader Mohammed Arab, 12, is employed in the camp. "I am working on behalf of a Bangladeshi, he gives me 50 taka at the end of each day. The cigarette company come here and they give us cigarettes to sell, in one day I can sell 1500 taka worth of cigarettes. I am selling the cigarettes less than others because my shop is bigger than others. I am not facing any problems because I am working for a local Bangladeshi." The price in Palong Khali refugee camp is 10 taka per packet. The price in Palong Khali Bazar is 9 taka per packet. REUTERS/Hannah McKay SEARCH "MCKAY TRADERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A large knife is displayed for sale in a shop in Palong Khali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, October 30, 2017. Abdur Razzak, 26, sells knives, pots and water buckets in the Palong Khali camp where he set up shop three months ago. After paying rent on his shop, wages for two assistants and transporting goods from the town of Ukhia, about 9 km (5.4 miles) north of the camp, Razzak earns about 500 taka profit on sales of 2,000 taka. "I'm not making a lot of money. I just profit a little," he said. REUTERS/Hannah McKay SEARCH "MCKAY TRADERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Red lentils are displayed for sale in a shop in Palong Khali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, October 30, 2017. Kalim Ullah, 42, fled from the Buthidaung area with his wife, six sons and a daughter. He used to transport goods in Myanmar, but was told that Rohingya could not own a business in Bangladesh. Ullah joined up with a local business owner and now sells snacks and red chillies in the camp for a daily wage of 100 taka. Two Bangladesh government officials confirmed that the refugees are not legally allowed to own businesses in the country since they are not citizens. "We are giving all kind of humanitarian assistance. They are not our citizens," said a senior home ministry official. "The Myanmar government will have to take them back." REUTERS/Hannah McKay
Fans are displayed for sale in a shop in Palong Khali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, November 1, 2017. Bangladeshi trader Nurul Absar, 40, started trading two months ago. "I sell different kinds of things like fans, shoes and many others," he said. "It's cheap so the refugees can buy them. They are unable to pay much so we sell it cheaply for them." The price in Palong Khali refugee camp is 35 taka per fan. The price in Palong Khali Bazar is 35 taka per fan. REUTERS/Hannah McKay SEARCH "MCKAY TRADERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Myanmar's Rohingya Muslims have endured killings, arson and rape by Myanmar troops and ethnic Rakhine Buddhist vigilantes since Aug. 25, in response to Rohingya insurgent attacks on security posts, the United Nations says.

It says problems like children trafficking existed in Bangladesh's camps, even before they were overwhelmed by the more than 600,000 new arrivals.

Now, driven by a need for food and other essentials, trade is starting to thrive in the Palong Khali camp, located about 2.5 miles from the Naf River that marks the border between Bangladesh and Myanmar.

Some refugees are returning to their previous occupations to eke out a living.

Abul Fayaj, a 50-year-old vegetable seller from Buthidaung township in Rakhine, now sells green chilies to residents of the camp.

He said a Bangladeshi lent him money for the chilies, which he sells for 200 taka ($2.39) per kg, higher than the local market price of 130 taka per kg.

"I don't have the money to take lots of food, that's why I have to take a loan," he said.

"I have to pay more to the lender who gave me the money to buy the vegetables, so there is only a small profit," said Fayaj, adding he takes home 100 taka a day.

29 PHOTOS
Children impacted by Rohingya crisis in Myanmar
See Gallery
Children impacted by Rohingya crisis in Myanmar
Rohingya refugees, who crossed the border from Myanmar two days earlier, walk after they received permission from the Bangladesh army to continue their way to the Kutupalong refugee camp, in Balukhali near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 19, 2017. REUTERS/ Zohra Bensemra
Rohingya refugee sits with her baby while waiting to receive humanitarian aid after arriving at Kutupalong refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Rohingya refugee baby, who crossed the border from Myanmar two days earlier, sleeps on his mother's shoulder while waiting to receive humanitarian aid after arriving at Kutupalong refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Rohingya refugees, who crossed the border from Myanmar two days earlier, queue to receive humanitarian aid while arriving at Kutupalong refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
A Rohingya refugee girl, who crossed the border from Myanmar two days earlier, waits to receive humanitarian aid at Kutupalong refugee camp, near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 19, 2017. REUTERS/ Zohra Bensemra
A Rohingya refugee girl who crossed the border from Myanmar two days before, crawls under a barbed wire during her walk to the Kotupalang refugee camp near Cox's Bazar in Bangladesh October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Rohingya refugees, who crossed the border from Myanmar two days earlier, rest while they wait to receive humanitarian aids at Kutupalong refugees camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
Rohingya refugees, who crossed the border from Myanmar two days earlier, rest while they wait to receive humanitarian aids at Kutupalong refugees camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 19, 2017. REUTERS/ Zohra Bensemra
A Rohingya refugee boy sits on the ground at Tang Khali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 18, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
A Rohingya refugee girl poses with a chicken at Balukhali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar in Bangladesh October 17, 2017. Picture taken October 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Mohamed Hares, an 8-month-old Rohingya refugee, receives treatment for a lung infection at the Red Cross emergency hospital near Kotupalang refugee camp, near Cox's Bazar in Bangladesh October 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A still unnamed four-days-old Rohingya refugee baby who crossed the border from Myanmar a day before, waits with his mother to receive permission from the Bangladeshi army to continue their way to the refugee camps, in Palang Khali, Bangladesh October 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A Rohingya refugee baby who crossed the border from Myanmar a day before, sleeps with his mother on a field as they wait to receive permission from the Bangladeshi army to continue their way to the refugee camps, in Palang Khali, Bangladesh October 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Rohingya refugees who crossed the border from Myanmar a day before, sleep on a field as they wait to receive permission from the Bangladeshi army to continue their way to the refugee camps, in Palang Khali, Bangladesh October 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Rohingya refugees arrive to the Bangladeshi side of the Naf river after crossing the border from Myanmar, in Palang Khali, Bangladesh October 16, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Rohingya refugees who fled from Myanmar wait to be let through after they were forced to walk back by Bangladesh border guards, in Palang Khali, Bangladesh October 16, 2017. REUTERS/ Zohra Bensemra
A 7 months old, malnourished Rohingya child cries as she lies on the floor at her family shelter in Kutupalong, refugees camp in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, October 15, 2017. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
Hamida, 65, a Rohingya refugee, who fled from Myanmar a day before, reacts after she along with other newly arrived refugees, spent a night waiting to be allowed to walk to a relief centre in Teknaf, near Cox's Bazar in Bangladesh, October 13, 2017. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
A Rohingya refugee girl queues to receive food at a camp near Teknaf, Bangladesh October 12, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Rohingya refugees who crossed the border last night ride on the back of the truck that takes them to a camp near Teknaf, Bangladesh October 12, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
A Rohingya refugee child lines up to receive an oral cholera vaccine, distributed by the World Health Organisation (WHO) with the help of volunteers and local NGO's, in a refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 11, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
A Rohingya refugee child gets an oral cholera vaccine, distributed by the World Health Organisation (WHO) with the help of volunteers and local NGO's, in a refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 11, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
A Rohingya refugee child gets an oral cholera vaccine, distributed by the World Health Organisation (WHO) with the help of volunteers and local NGO's, in a refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 11, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
A daughter of Ansar Ullah, a Rohingya refugee who fled with his family from Myanmar a day before, is carried in a basket by her father after thousands of newly arrived refugees spent a night by the road between refugee camps near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 10, 2017. Ansar Ullah, who said his village in Buthidaung region was attacked by Myanmar military, carried his two daughters in baskets for eight days as he and other refugees were making their way to Bangladesh. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Nd Rashid, a 28-year-old Rohingya refugee who fled with his family from Myanmar a day before, waits for medical attention after spending the night by the road between refugee camps near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 10, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Rohingya refugees walk in a rice field after crossing the border in Palang Khali, Bangladesh October 9, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
A Rohingya refugee man hols his child as he swims to cross Myanmar-Bangladesh border in Palang Khali, Bangladesh, October 9, 2017. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Obaidul Mannan, 40, with five daughters and two sons, traded clocks in Myanmar until the military came to his village, arresting people and burning homes.

He now sells betel nut that he bought with 9 grams (0.3 ounces) of gold that belonged to his wife. His complaints are common to shopkeepers everywhere.

"The problem I’m facing here is that I'm selling next door to traders who are also selling the same items," he said.

Some Bangladeshi shopkeepers have hired Rohingya to run shops within the camp.

Kalim Ullah, 42, fled from the Buthidaung area with his wife, six sons and a daughter.

He used to transport goods in Myanmar, but was told that Rohingya could not own a business in Bangladesh. Ullah joined up with a local business owner and now sells snacks and red chilies in the camp for a daily wage of 100 taka.

Two Bangladesh government officials confirmed that the refugees are not legally allowed to own businesses in the country since they are not citizens.

"We are giving all kind of humanitarian assistance. They are not our citizens," said a senior home ministry official. "The Myanmar government will have to take them back."

Bangladeshis are aware of the opportunities that the Rohingya exodus provides for trade and a number of them have moved closer to the camps.

Abdur Razzak, 26, sells knives, pots and water buckets in the Palong Khali camp where he set up shop three months ago.

After paying rent on his shop, wages for two assistants and transporting goods from the town of Ukhia, about 5.4 miles north of the camp, Razzak earns about 500 taka profit on sales of 2,000 taka.

"I'm not making a lot of money. I just profit a little," he said.

($1 = 83.7000 taka)

14 PHOTOS
Portraits of injured Rohingya refugees
See Gallery
Portraits of injured Rohingya refugees
Rohingya refugee Nur Kamal, 17, poses for a photograph to show his head injuries, at Kutupalang refugee camp, near Cox's Bazar in Bangladesh, October 13, 2017. Kamal described how soldiers assaulted him after they found the young shopkeeper hiding in his home in Kan Hpu village in Maungdaw. "They hit me with a rifle butt on my head first and then with a knife," Kamal said. His uncle found him unconscious in a pool of blood. It took them two weeks to get to Bangladesh. "We want justice," Kamal said. "We want the international community to help us obtain justice." REUTERS/Jorge Silva SEARCH "ROHINGYA INJURIES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Rohingya refugees Mohamed Heron, 6, and his brother Mohamed Akter, 4, pose for a portrait to show burns on their bodies at Kutupalong refugee camp, near Cox's Bazar in Bangladesh, October 14, 2017. Boys' uncle Mohamed Inus said burns resulted from Myanmar's armed forces firing rockets at their village. Two of their siblings, one seven years old and the other a 10-month-old infant, died in the attack, according to the uncle. Their father was held by the military and has not been heard of since. "These two children survived when our village was fired on with rockets," Inus said. Fleeing along with other villagers who abandoned their scorched homes, the boys reached Bangladesh after a three-day trek. At Kutupalong, they were treated for three weeks for their burns at a Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) clinic. REUTERS/Jorge Silva SEARCH "ROHINGYA INJURIES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Rohingya refugee Imam Hossain, 42, sleeps on the ground at Kutupalang refugee camp, near Cox's Bazar in Bangladesh, October 14, 2017. Hossain said he was returning home after teaching at a madrassa in his village when three men attacked him with knives. The next day, he made his wife and two children leave with other villagers fleeing to Bangladesh. He reached Cox's Bazar later. He was still searching for his family. "I want to ask the Myanmar government why they are harming the Rohingya? Why do Buddhists hate us? Why do you torture us? What is wrong with us?" he said. REUTERS/Jorge Silva SEARCH "ROHINGYA INJURIES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Rohingya refugee Abdu Rahaman, 73, poses for a photograph at Leda refugee camp in Bangladesh, October 15, 2017. Rahaman, a merchant from Maungdaw, was ambushed while walking on a mountain path with other refugees. A machete thrown at his feet severed three toes as he ran from his attackers. With his foot bleeding through a tourniquet made from his longyi, or sarong, Rahaman walked for two more hours, before his nephew and friends carried him across the border. "Our future is not good," he said. "Allah must help us. The international community has to do something." REUTERS/Jorge Silva SEARCH "ROHINGYA INJURIES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
ATTENTION EDITORS - VISUAL COVERAGES OF SCENES OF INJURY Rohingya refugee Momtaz Begum, 30, poses for a photograph at Balukhali refugee camp in Bangladesh October 19, 2017. Begum told how soldiers came to her village demanding valuables. "I told them I was poor and had nothing. One of them started beating me saying, 'If you have no money, then we will kill you.'" After beating her, they locked her inside her house and set the roof on fire. She escaped to find her three sons dead and her daughter beaten and bleeding. Momtaz fled to Bangladesh where she spent 20 days at the MSF clinic receiving treatment for burns to her face and body. "What can I say about the future, if now we have no food, no house, no family. We cannot think about the future. They have killed that as well." REUTERS/Jorge Silva SEARCH "ROHINGYA INJURIES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Rohingya refugee Anwara Begum, 36, poses for a photograph at Kutupalang refugee camp, near Cox's Bazar in Bangladesh, October 13, 2017. Begum said she woke to find her home in Maungdaw township, in the northernmost part of Rakhine state, in flames. Before she could get out, the burning roof caved in on her and her nylon clothes melted onto her arms. Begum's husband carried his wife for eight days to reach the Kutupalong camp. "I thought I was going to die. I tried to stay alive for my children," Begum said, adding she was still waiting for treatment for her burns. REUTERS/Jorge Silva SEARCH "ROHINGYA INJURIES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Rohingya refugee Setara Begum, 12, poses for a photograph at Nayapara refugee camp in Bangladesh, October 14, 2017. Begum was among nine siblings in their home in Maungdaw when it was hit by a rocket. "I saved eight of my nine children from the burning house, but Setara was trapped inside," said her mother, Arafa. "I could see her crying in the middle of the fire, but it was difficult to save her. By the time we could reach her, she was badly burned." Setara's father carried her for two days to Bangladesh.�The young girl received no treatment for the severe burns to her feet. Her feet healed. But she has no toes. The trauma has scarred her psychologically. "She has been mute from that day, and doesn't speak to anyone," her mother said. "She only cries silently." REUTERS/Jorge Silva SEARCH "ROHINGYA INJURIES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Rohingya refugee Mohamed Jabair, 21, poses for a photograph to show burns on his bodies, which he said he sustained when his house was set on fire in Myanmar, at Kutupalang refugee camp, near Cox's Bazar in Bangladesh, October 17, 2017. Knocked unconscious and badly burned, Jabair was carried by his brother and others for four days to Cox's Bazar. "I was blind for many weeks and admitted to a government hospital in Cox's Bazar for 23 days. I was frightened that I would be blind forever," he said. Jabair said money sent by relatives in Malaysia had run out and he could no longer afford treatment. REUTERS/Jorge Silva SEARCH "ROHINGYA INJURIES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Rohingya refugee Ansar Allah, 11, poses for a photograph at Leda refugee camp in Bangladesh, October 15, 2017. Allah showed a large, livid scar - the result of a gunshot wound. "They sprayed us with bullets, as our house was burning," his mother Samara said. "It was a bullet half the size of my index finger," she said, before adding, "I can't stop thinking, why did God put us in that dangerous situation?" REUTERS/Jorge Silva SEARCH "ROHINGYA INJURIES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Rohingya refugee Kalabarow, 50, poses for a photograph at Leda refugee camp, in Bangladesh, October 15, 2017. Kalabarow said her husband, daughter and one son were killed when soldiers fired on her village in Maungdaw. She was hit in her right foot. She lay where she fell, pretending to be dead, for several hours before a grandson found her. During their 11-day journey to Bangladesh, a village doctor amputated her infected foot and four men carried her on a stretcher made of bamboo and a bedsheet. "As we walked through the forest, we saw burnt villages and dead bodies. I thought we would never be safe," she said. REUTERS/Jorge Silva SEARCH "ROHINGYA INJURIES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Mohammed Shoaib, 7, who was shot on his chest before crossing the border from Myanmar in August, shows his injury outside a medical centre after seeing a doctor, at Kutupalong refugee camp near Cox?s Bazar, Bangladesh November 5, 2017. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Mohammed Shoaib, 7, who was shot on his chest before crossing the border from Myanmar in August, shows his injury outside a medical centre after seeing a doctor, at Kutupalong refugee camp near Cox?s Bazar, Bangladesh November 5, 2017. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

(Reporting by Hannah McKay in PALONG KAHLI; Additional reporting by Ruma Paul in DHAKA; Writing by Christian Schmollinger; Editing by Darren Schuettler)

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.