'Is this South Korea?': North Korean defector was reportedly unsure of location, wanted Korean music

  • A North Korean soldier who defected was reportedly unsure he was in South Korea.
  • After getting confirmation, he asked if he could listen to South Korean music.
  • South Korean officials are exploring the possibility that the defector may have been influenced by the country's propaganda.


A North Korean defector receiving medical care at a South Korean hospital made an interesting request after confirming he was in South Korea, according to sources from the South Korean newspaper Dong-a Ilbo.

The defector was reportedly shot six times and received multiple surgical procedures after stealing a jeep and crawling southward as his comrades fired 40 rounds from their weapons. Doctors said the defector was in stable condition, according to Reuters.

"Is this South Korea," the defector asked, according to the Ilbo.

After he received confirmation that he was in fact in South Korea, he reportedly said he would "like to listen to South Korean songs," the Ilbo reported.

RELATED: South Korea’s militarized border town

15 PHOTOS
South Korea’s militarized border town Paju
See Gallery
South Korea’s militarized border town Paju
People look toward a North Korean village through a pair of binoculars at an observation post near the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas in Paju, South Korea, July 19, 2017. Picture taken on July 19, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
Resident Woo Jong-il poses for photographs inside his private bunker at his house near the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas in Paju, South Korea, July 14, 2017. Picture taken on July 14, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
People shops at a souvenir shop near the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas in Paju, South Korea, July 14, 2017. Picture taken on July 14, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
A private bunker built by resident Woo Jong-il is seen at his house near the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas in Paju, South Korea, July 14, 2017. Picture taken on July 14, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
A South Korean security guard stands guard on an empty road which leads to the Kaesong Industrial Complex (KIC) at the South's CIQ (Customs, Immigration and Quarantine), just south of the demilitarised zone separating the two Koreas, in Paju, South Korea, February 11, 2016. The Korean characters on the gateway reads "Inter-Korean Transit Office". REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
Resident Woo Jong-il poses for photographs inside his private bunker at his house near the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas in Paju, South Korea, July 14, 2017. Picture taken on July 14, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
A Chinese tourist looks over a barbed-wire fence at the Imjingak pavilion near the demilitarized zone which separates the two Koreas, in Paju, South Korea, August 21, 2015. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Resident Woo Jong-il speaks inside his private bunker at his house near the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas in Paju, South Korea, July 14, 2017. Picture taken on July 14, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
A South Korea's guard post is seen behind a barbed-wire fence near the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas in Paju, South Korea, July 14, 2017. Picture taken on July 14, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
Visitors at a shopping mall near the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas in Paju, South Korea, July 16, 2017. Picture taken on July 16, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
Visitors are seen at a shopping mall near the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas in Paju, South Korea, July 16, 2017. Picture taken on July 16, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
Visitors look toward a North Korean village through a pair of binoculars at a shopping mall near the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas in Paju, South Korea, July 16, 2017. Picture taken on July 16, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
A woman poses for photographs in front of a barbed-wire fence near the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas in Paju, South Korea, July 14, 2017. Picture taken on July 14, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
FILE PHOTO: A shelter is seen near the Tae Sung freedom village near the Military Demarcation Line (MDL), inside the demilitarised zone separating the two Koreas, in Paju, South Korea, November 22, 2016. Picture taken on November 22, 2016. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

According to government sources cited by the Ilbo, South Korean officials are investigating whether the defector may have been successfully influenced by South Korean female music groups. South Korea employs various types of psychological operations against the North, including blasting South Korean pop music on loudspeakers. Government sources told the Ilbo that the defector may have been motivated to cross the border because of a connection between South Korea's pop-music propaganda and his young age.

Early in recovery, the defector reportedly communicated with doctors by blinking his eyes and changing his facial expressions, the Ilbo continued.

Although authorities have yet to release the defector's identity and rank, he has become a symbol of the humanitarian struggle in North Korea after doctors discovered parasites in his digestive tract.

Lead surgeon Lee Cook-Jung said that there were dozens of parasites, some over 10 inches, that were removed during surgery: "In my over 20 year-long career as a surgeon, I have only seen something like this in a textbook."

NOW WATCH: Satellites reveal 'secret' US military bases around the world

See Also:

SEE ALSO: Injured defector's parasites and diet hint at a hard life in North Korea

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.