Hundreds of Las Vegas shooting victims file lawsuits in California court

Nov 20 (Reuters) - Hundreds of victims of the Oct. 1 mass shooting in Las Vegas filed five lawsuits on Monday in a California court against the operators of the hotel from which the gunman fired, the organizers of the country music festival he targeted and the killer's estate.

The largest of the lawsuits was filed on behalf of 450 people who were either injured in or witnessed the shooting, while the other four were brought by families of people who were killed or severely injured.

All five cases were filed in Los Angeles Superior Court.

SEE ALSO: California mass shooter made his own rifles

Muhammad Aziz, a Houston-based lawyer heading the lawsuits, said they were filed in California because nearly all the plaintiffs were from the state and had been treated there. He noted that Live Nation Entertainment Inc, the event organizer, was a California-based company.

Stephen Paddock, 64, fired into the crowd gathered for the Route 91 Harvest Festival from a 32nd-floor hotel suite at the Mandalay Bay Hotel in Las Vegas on Oct. 1, killing 58 people and injuring hundreds more, the worst mass shooting in modern U.S. history. Paddock also killed himself.

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Las Vegas mass shooting survivors
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Las Vegas mass shooting survivors
Paola Bautista, 39, from Fontana, California, (R) sits in her hospital bed next to her sister Daisy Bautista at Sunrise Hospital & Medical Center after being shot at the Route 91 music festival mass shooting next to the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Braden Matejka, 30, (L) and his girlfriend Amanda Homulos, 23, from British Columbia, Canada sit outside Sunrise Hospital & Medical Center after he was discharged after being shot at the Route 91 music festival mass shooting next to the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 4: Kassidy Owen, 22, left, and Taylor Schmidt, 21, both of Las Vegas, NV, are photographed on Wednesday, October 4, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. Owen and Schmidt both survived the mass shooting on Sunday's evening. Sometimes I think it happened then the next second I say did that really happend,' Owen said. 'I keep hearing the shots in my head, people running and hear the ambulances,' she added. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 4: Veteran Steve Charshafian, 59, speaks about Sunday's night mass shooting and recalls helping wounded people on Wednesday, October 4, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. Charshafian survived the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival shooting with his wife when they hid inside their car. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 04: Aaron Stalker is interviewed outside Dance Dynamics on Wednesday October 04, 2017 in Las Vegas, NV. Stalker helped to evacuate and care for victims during Sunday night's mass shooting at the Route 91 Harvest Festival. Aaron was attending a hockey game when his girlfriend, Stephanie Melanson called him from the concert. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS - OCTOBER 3: Jonathan Smith was shot at least twice while trying to run back and save others in the crowd at the Route 91 Harvest festival in Las Vegas. (Photo by Heather Long/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 03: Brian Hopkins, the lead singer of the band Elvis Monroe, is interviewed by a tv reported on the south end of the Las Vegas Strip on the on October 3, 2017, after the mass shooting that killed 59 people and inured more than 500 people at the Route 91 Harvest Festival near Mandalay Bay on October 1, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. Hopkins took over 20 people into a freezer near the venue. Hopkins filmed himself during the shooting, still unsure of what the chaos was going on outside in the venue. (Photo by Doug Kranz/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NEVADA - OCTOBER 2: With the presence of her family, Danny Alegria, from left, Evan Algeria and Lucy Alegria - Carmen Alegria recounts her harrowing experience surviving and escaping the mass shooting that killed 59 and injured more than 525 at the Route 91 Harvest Festival, in Las Vegas, Nevada, on Oct. 2, 2017. (Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
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The victims accused the hotel operator MGM Resorts International and its subsidiary Mandalay Corp, which owns the hotel, of failing to properly monitor Paddock's activities, train staff members and employ adequate security measures.

The festival goers also alleged Live Nation was negligent for failing to provide adequate exits and properly train staff for an emergency.

Several lawsuits have previously been filed in the shooting, mostly in Nevada state court. One of those filed on Monday was brought by college student Paige Gasper, who brought the first lawsuit over the mass shooting.

Gasper voluntarily dismissed the Nevada lawsuit on Friday.

Live Nation and MGM did not immediately respond to a request for comment. The companies have previously declined to comment on lawsuits.

Plaintiffs also sued the shooter's estate for battery and assault. The reportedly wealthy shooter is thought to have had multimillion-dollar real estate investments across Texas and California.

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Man arrives in Las Vegas delivers hand-made crosses to honor mass shooting victims
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Man arrives in Las Vegas delivers hand-made crosses to honor mass shooting victims
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: Mourners gather at the 'Welcome to Las Vegas' sign where Greg Zanis, a retired carpenter from Chicago, Illinois, placed 58 crosses to honor those who were killed during the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. On October 1, Stephen Paddock opened fire on the crowd killing at least 58 people and injuring more than 450. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: Mourners gather at the 'Welcome to Las Vegas' sign where Greg Zanis, a retired carpenter from Chicago, Illinois, placed 58 crosses to honor those who were killed during the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings, October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. On October 1, Stephen Paddock opened fire on the crowd killing at least 58 people and injuring more than 450. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: Mourners gather at the 'Welcome to Las Vegas' sign where Greg Zanis, a retired carpenter from Chicago, Illinois, placed 58 crosses to honor those who were killed during the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings, October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. On October 1, Stephen Paddock opened fire on the crowd killing at least 58 people and injuring more than 450. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: U.S. Army veteran Adam Arizaga of Las Vegas, Nevada, places flowers on a cross at the 'Welcome to Las Vegas' sign on October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. 58 crosses made by Greg Zanis, a retired carpenter from Chicago, Illinois, are at the location to honor those who were killed during the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings. On October 1, Stephen Paddock opened fire on the crowd killing at least 58 people and injuring more than 450. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: U.S. Army veteran Adam Arizaga of Las Vegas, Nevada, places flowers on a cross at the 'Welcome to Las Vegas' sign. 58 crosses made by Greg Zanis, a retired carpenter from Chicago, Illinois, are at the location to honor those who were killed during the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings. October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: Mourners gather at the 'Welcome to Las Vegas' sign where Greg Zanis, a retired carpenter from Chicago, Illinois, placed 58 crosses to honor those who were killed during the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. On October 1, Stephen Paddock opened fire on the crowd killing at least 58 people and injuring more than 450. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: Mourners gather at the 'Welcome to Las Vegas' sign where Greg Zanis, a retired carpenter from Chicago, Illinois, placed 58 crosses to honor those who were killed during the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings, October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. On October 1, Stephen Paddock opened fire on the crowd killing at least 58 people and injuring more than 450. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: Mourners gather at the 'Welcome to Las Vegas' sign where Greg Zanis, a retired carpenter from Chicago, Illinois, placed 58 crosses to honor those who were killed during the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings, October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. On October 1, Stephen Paddock opened fire on the crowd killing at least 58 people and injuring more than 450. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
Greg Zanis of Chicago, Illinois works on one of the 58 white crosses he set up for the victims of the Route 91 music festival mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 5, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Wattie
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: Mourners gather at the 'Welcome to Las Vegas' sign where Greg Zanis, a retired carpenter from Chicago, Illinois, placed 58 crosses to honor those who were killed during the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings, October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. On October 1, Stephen Paddock opened fire on the crowd killing at least 58 people and injuring more than 450. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: Mourners gather at the 'Welcome to Las Vegas' sign where Greg Zanis, a retired carpenter from Chicago, Illinois, placed 58 crosses to honor those who were killed during the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings, October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. On October 1, Stephen Paddock opened fire on the crowd killing at least 58 people and injuring more than 450. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: Mourners gather at the 'Welcome to Las Vegas' sign where Greg Zanis, a retired carpenter from Chicago, Illinois, placed 58 crosses to honor those who were killed during the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings, October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. On October 1, Stephen Paddock opened fire on the crowd killing at least 58 people and injuring more than 450. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
Greg Zanis of Chicago, Illinois works on one of the 58 white crosses he set up for the victims of the Route 91 music festival mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 5, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Wattie
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: Mourners gather at the 'Welcome to Las Vegas' sign where Greg Zanis, a retired carpenter from Chicago, Illinois, placed 58 crosses to honor those who were killed during the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings, October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. On October 1, Stephen Paddock opened fire on the crowd killing at least 58 people and injuring more than 450. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
Greg Zanis of Chicago, Illinois works on one of the 58 white crosses he set up for the victims of the Route 91 music festival mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 5, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Wattie TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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A court hearing about who will be appointed to administer Paddock's estate is set for Dec. 7.

Slide Fire Solutions, the maker of the so-called bump stock device Paddock used to achieve a near-automatic rate of fire, was named in previous lawsuits over the shooting, but not in any of the suits filed on Monday.

Aziz said Slide Fire was not named because most of his clients supported the right to bear arms.

"We want to focus on hotel and venue security, not turn this into a gun rights case," he said. (Reporting by Tina Bellon; editing by Anthony Lin and G Crosse)

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