Man accidentally shoots self, wife during gun safety discussion

A Tennessee man accidentally shot himself and his wife Thursday during a discussion at their church about gun safety concerns.

Local news station WATE reports that the man and his wife, whose names have not been released, were attending a social club meeting at the First United Methodist Church in Tellico Plains. The club is unaffiliated with the church itself.

“We were talking about concealed carry and protecting ourselves,” witness Ray Zillick told WATE.

During the discussion, one attendee pulled out his own gun to show others. The exact details of how the gun went off are somewhat unclear.

Tellico Plains Police Department Chief Russ Parks told the Knoxville News Sentinel that the man pulled the trigger after declaring the gun was unloaded — apparently forgetting he had just loaded it. However, Zillick said that the man accidentally squeezed the trigger while pulling the gun out of his pocket.

When the gun went off, the bullet hit the man’s right hand before going through his wife’s abdomen and forearm. The husband and wife, both in their 80s, each suffered from injuries that were not life-threatening.

Parks told ABC News that the man was carrying the gun legally and that no charges will be filed.

Related: Artist creates gun art to reflect feelings on war: 

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Artist makes colorful paper guns to examine weapons and war
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Artist makes colorful paper guns to examine weapons and war
Paper sculptures in the shape of handgun are seen as a part of Chinese artist Li Hongbo's work "Ocean of Flowers" ahead of the exhibition at Eight One Art Museum in Beijing, China June 13, 2017. According to Li, nearly 2000 sculptures in shape of different weapons, made of hundreds of pieces of brightly coloured paper, reflect his thoughts about desire, destruction, hatred and war. Picture taken June 13, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Lee TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Chinese artist Li Hongbo gets a paper sculpture in the shape of a handgun from his assistant as he sets up his work "Ocean of Flowers" at Eight One Art Museum in Beijing, China June 14, 2017. According to Li, nearly 2000 sculptures in shape of different weapons, made of hundreds of pieces of brightly coloured paper, reflect his thoughts about desire, destruction, hatred and war. Picture taken June 14, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Lee TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Chinese artist Li Hongbo (front) and his assistant set up his work "Ocean of Flowers" at Eight One Art Museum in Beijing, China June 14, 2017. According to Li, nearly 2000 sculptures in shape of different weapons, made of hundreds of pieces of brightly coloured paper, reflect his thoughts about desire, destruction, hatred and war. Picture taken June 14, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Lee
A paper sculpture in the shape of a handgun is placed as a part of Chinese artist Li Hongbo's work "Ocean of Flowers" ahead of the exhibition at Eight One Art Museum in Beijing, China June 14, 2017. According to Li, nearly 2000 sculptures in shape of different weapons, made of hundreds of pieces of brightly coloured paper, reflect his thoughts about desire, destruction, hatred and war. Picture taken June 14, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Lee
Paper sculptures in the shape of AK 47s, handguns and bullets are seen as a part of Chinese artist Li Hongbo's work "Ocean of Flowers" ahead of the exhibition at Eight One Art Museum in Beijing, China June 14, 2017. According to Li, nearly 2000 sculptures in shape of different weapons, made of hundreds of pieces of brightly coloured paper, reflect his thoughts about desire, destruction, hatred and war. Picture taken June 14, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Lee
Chinese artist Li Hongbo flattens a paper sculpture in the shape of a handgun as he sets up his work "Ocean of Flowers" at Eight One Art Museum in Beijing, China June 14, 2017. According to Li, nearly 2000 sculptures in shape of different weapons, made of hundreds of pieces of brightly coloured paper, reflect his thoughts about desire, destruction, hatred and war. Picture taken June 14, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Lee
Chinese artist Li Hongbo gets a paper sculpture in the shape of a handgun from his assistant as he sets up his work "Ocean of Flowers" at Eight One Art Museum in Beijing, China June 14, 2017. According to Li, nearly 2000 sculptures in shape of different weapons, made of hundreds of pieces of brightly coloured paper, reflect his thoughts about desire, destruction, hatred and war. Picture taken June 14, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Lee
Chinese artist Li Hongbo and his assistant set up a paper sculpture in the shape of an AK 47 assault rifle for his work "Ocean of Flowers" at Eight One Art Museum in Beijing, China June 13, 2017. According to Li, nearly 2000 sculptures in shape of different weapons, made of hundreds of pieces of brightly coloured paper, reflect his thoughts about desire, destruction, hatred and war. Picture taken June 13, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Lee
Paper sculptures in the shape of handguns and bullets are seen as a part of Chinese artist Li Hongbo's work "Ocean of Flowers" ahead of the exhibition at Eight One Art Museum in Beijing, China June 14, 2017. According to Li, nearly 2000 sculptures in shape of different weapons, made of hundreds of pieces of brightly coloured paper, reflect his thoughts about desire, destruction, hatred and war. Picture taken June 14, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Lee
Chinese artist Li Hongbo sets up his work "Ocean of Flowers" at Eight One Art Museum in Beijing, China June 14, 2017. According to Li, nearly 2000 sculptures in shape of different weapons, made of hundreds of pieces of brightly coloured paper, reflect his thoughts about desire, destruction, hatred and war. Picture taken June 14, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Lee
Chinese artist Li Hongbo prepares a paper sculpture in the shape of a handgun as a part of his work ?Ocean of Flowers? at Eight One Art Museum in Beijing, China June 13, 2017. According to Li, nearly 2000 sculptures in shape of different weapons, made of hundreds of pieces of brightly coloured paper, reflect his thoughts about desire, destruction, hatred and war. Picture taken June 13, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Lee
Paper sculptures in the shape of handguns and bullets are placed as a part of Chinese artist Li Hongbo's work "Ocean of Flowers" ahead of the exhibition at Eight One Art Museum in Beijing, China June 13, 2017. According to Li, nearly 2000 sculptures in shape of different weapons, made of hundreds of pieces of brightly coloured paper, reflect his thoughts about desire, destruction, hatred and war. Picture taken June 13, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Lee
Chinese artist Li Hongbo places paper sculptures in the shape of handguns as he sets up his work "Ocean of Flowers" at Eight One Art Museum in Beijing, China June 13, 2017. According to Li, nearly 2000 sculptures in shape of different weapons, made of hundreds of pieces of brightly coloured paper, reflect his thoughts about desire, destruction, hatred and war. Picture taken June 13, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Lee
Assistants of Chinese artist Li Hongbo place paper sculptures in the shape of handguns for Li's work "Ocean of Flowers" at Eight One Art Museum in Beijing, China June 13, 2017. According to Li, nearly 2000 sculptures in shape of different weapons, made of hundreds of pieces of brightly coloured paper, reflect his thoughts about desire, destruction, hatred and war. Picture taken June 13, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Lee
Paper sculptures in the shape of handguns are seen as a part of Chinese artist Li Hongbo's work "Ocean of Flowers" ahead of the exhibition at Eight One Art Museum in Beijing, China June 13, 2017. According to Li, nearly 2000 sculptures in shape of different weapons, made of hundreds of pieces of brightly coloured paper, reflect his thoughts about desire, destruction, hatred and war. Picture taken June 13, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Lee
Chinese artist Li Hongbo and his assistant carry paper sculptures in the shape of AK 47 assault rifles as they set up Li's work "Ocean of Flowers" at Eight One Art Museum in Beijing, China June 13, 2017. According to Li, nearly 2000 sculptures in shape of different weapons, made of hundreds of pieces of brightly coloured paper, reflect his thoughts about desire, destruction, hatred and war. Picture taken June 13, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Lee
Chinese artist Li Hongbo flattens a paper sculpture in shape of MP5 submachine gun for his work "Ocean of Flowers" at Eight One Art Museum in Beijing, China June 14, 2017. According to Li, nearly 2000 sculptures in shape of different weapons, made of hundreds of pieces of brightly coloured paper, reflect his thoughts about desire, destruction, hatred and war. Picture taken June 14, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Lee
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  • This article originally appeared on HuffPost.
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