‘Trump effect’ prompts global perception of United States to drop: study

The United States is no longer on brand to be the best.

According to the Nation Brands Index’s annual ranking of countries with the best “brand image,” Germany is the most admired country worldwide while the United States, meanwhile has dropped in the 2017 ranking from first to sixth.

To complete the study, German-based market research firm GfK teamed up with British political consultant and professor Simon Anholt to measure the opinions worldwide on “the power quality of each country’s brand image.”

More than 50 countries were analyzed in categories including people, governance, exports, tourism, investment and immigration and culture and heritage.

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Idaho

Approval rating: 50% or higher

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Utah

Approval rating: 50% or higher

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Montana

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Wyoming

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North Dakota

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South Dakota

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Nebraska

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Kansas

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Oklahoma

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Arkansas

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Louisiana

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Alabama

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South Carolina

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Tennessee 

Approval rating: 50% or higher

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Kentucky

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West Virginia

Approval rating: 50% or higher

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Alaska

Approval rating: 50% or higher

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Massachusetts

Approval rating: Below 40%

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Vermont

Approval rating: Below 40%

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Rhode Island

Approval rating: Below 40%

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Connecticut

Approval rating: Below 40%

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New Jersey

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New York

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Delaware

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Maryland

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Virginia

Approval rating: Below 40%

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Illinois

Approval rating: Below 40%

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Minnesota

Approval rating: Below 40%

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Colorado

Approval rating: Below 40%

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New Mexico

Approval rating: Below 40%

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Washington

Approval rating: Below 40%

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Oregon

Approval rating: Below 40%

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California

Approval rating: Below 40%

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Hawaii

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France, Britain, Canada and Japan claimed the remaining spots between Germany and the newly-dethroned United States for 2017.

“The USA’s fall in the ‘Governance’ cateogy suggests that we are witnessing the ‘Trump Effect,’ following President Trump’s focused political message of ‘America First,’” Anholt said, noting United States saw a similar drop to seventh place after the re-election of George W. Buch.

“Previously, America has never stayed outside the top ranking for more than a year at a time: it will be interesting to see whether this holds true in the 2018 ranking.”

Anholt, who created the study in 2005, also pointed out that Americans view their own country more favorably than this time last year, despite the contrary outside perspective.

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Former Vice President Joe Biden

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Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.)

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.)

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Sen. Kamala Davis (D-Calif.)

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Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.)

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Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.)

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Facebook CEO and founder Mark Zuckerberg

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Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.)

(Photo by Jason LaVeris/FilmMagic)

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.)

(Photo by: Lloyd Bishop/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images)

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo

(Photo credit MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)

Former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley

(Photo credit NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

Former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro

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Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.)

(Photo by Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.)

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Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.)

(Photo credit ZACH GIBSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick

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New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio

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Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban

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Environmental activist Tom Steyer

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Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez

(Photo by Taylor Hill/FilmMagic)

Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton 

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Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe

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California Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom

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Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg

(Photo credit FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images)

Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz

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Former first lady Michelle Obama

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Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson

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Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii)

(Photo credit TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)

Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.)

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-N.Y)

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

California Gov. Jerry Brown

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Media mogul Oprah Winfrey

(Photo by Moeletsi Mabe/Sunday Times/Gallo Images/Getty Images)

Former Sen. Russ Feingold (D-Wis.)

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean

(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Former Vice President Al Gore

(Photo credit DAVID MCNEW/AFP/Getty Images)

Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.)

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Former Sen. Jim Webb (D-Va.)

(Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti

(Photo by Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images,)

Rep. Seth Moulton (D-Mass.)

(Photo by Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu

Albin Lohr-Jones/Pool via Bloomberg

Sen. Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.)

(Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee

(Photo by Karen Ducey/Getty Images)

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The U.K. held firm in third place this year despite the controversial Brexit vote, while France made the most notable jump upwards to second.

Germany was ranked in the top five in every single category in the study aside from “tourism,” for which it earned the tenth spot.

“Germany’s image no longer rests on our economic strength,” German Foreign Prime Minister told USA Today after the results were made public. “People think we’re capable of much more in the world.”

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