Trump returns from Asia to a White House and party in crisis

  • President Donald Trump returned home from a 12-day trip to Asia to a White House and Republican party embroiled in multiple scandals.
  • The Republicans are staring down the barrel of losing a crucial Senate seat in Alabama, which should be a GOP stronghold.
  • Trump campaign members face renewed scrutiny over their contacts with Russia.
  • The Republican tax plan will need the Democrats blessing to avoid massive spending cuts to programs like Medicare and Border Patrol.

President Donald Trump has returned home after a 12-day marathon trip across Asia to a White House, and a Republican party, struggling to put out several fires at once. 

Republican Alabama Senator Roy Moore, whose reelection campaign has been clouded by five allegations of sexual misconduct, some of them with minors, have the party's leadership fretting over losing a seat in a deep red state and desperate for answers.

"He's obviously not fit to be in the United States Senate," Senate Majority Leader McConnell told reporters, according to Reuters, "and we've looked at all the options to try and prevent that from happening."

RELATED: President Trump addresses the National Assembly in South Korea

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President Trump addresses the National Assembly in South Korea
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President Trump addresses the National Assembly in South Korea
US President Donald Trump (C) addresses the National Assembly in Seoul on November 8, 2017. Trump's marathon Asia tour moves to South Korea, another key ally in the struggle with nuclear-armed North Korea, but one with deep reservations about the US president's strategy for dealing with the crisis. / AFP PHOTO / Lee Jin-man (Photo credit should read LEE JIN-MAN/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump (C) addresses the National Assembly in Seoul on November 8, 2017. Trump's marathon Asia tour moves to South Korea, another key ally in the struggle with nuclear-armed North Korea, but one with deep reservations about the US president's strategy for dealing with the crisis. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the South Korean National Assembly in Seoul, South Korea, November 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
US President Donald Trump (C) applauds at the of his speech to the National Assembly in Seoul on November 8, 2017. Trump's marathon Asia tour moves to South Korea, another key ally in the struggle with nuclear-armed North Korea, but one with deep reservations about the US president's strategy for dealing with the crisis. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Members of the National Assembly listen to US President Donald Trump (not pictured) delivering his addresses in Seoul on November 8, 2017. Trump's marathon Asia tour moves to South Korea, another key ally in the struggle with nuclear-armed North Korea, but one with deep reservations about the US president's strategy for dealing with the crisis. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the South Korean National Assembly in Seoul, South Korea, November 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
US President Donald Trump (C) addresses the National Assembly in Seoul on November 8, 2017. Trump's marathon Asia tour moves to South Korea, another key ally in the struggle with nuclear-armed North Korea, but one with deep reservations about the US president's strategy for dealing with the crisis. / AFP PHOTO / Lee Jin-man (Photo credit should read LEE JIN-MAN/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump (C) addresses the National Assembly in Seoul on November 8, 2017. Trump's marathon Asia tour moves to South Korea, another key ally in the struggle with nuclear-armed North Korea, but one with deep reservations about the US president's strategy for dealing with the crisis. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Pro-Trump supporters wave the US flags during a rally welcoming US President Donald Trump's visit near the National Assembly in Seoul on November 8, 2017 as Trump is due to address the South Korea's national assembly. North Korea poses a worldwide threat that needs worldwide action, President Donald Trump said in Seoul November 7, but insisted 'we are making a lot of progress' in reining in the rogue state. / AFP PHOTO / JUNG YEON-JE (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)
Pro-Trump supporters hold placards showing portraits of US President Donald Trump (L) and South Korean President Moon Jae-In (R) during a rally welcoming Trump's visit near the National Assembly in Seoul on November 8, 2017 as Trump is due to address the South Korea's national assembly. North Korea poses a worldwide threat that needs worldwide action, President Donald Trump said in Seoul November 7, but insisted 'we are making a lot of progress' in reining in the rogue state. / AFP PHOTO / JUNG YEON-JE (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the South Korean National Assembly in Seoul, South Korea, November 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Anti-Trump protesters hold signs near the South Korean National Assembly where U.S. President Donald Trump is due to speak, in Seoul, South Korea, November 8, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
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One such option, according to McConnell, would require Trump's Attorney General, former Alabama Senator Jeff Sessions, to step down and run as a write-in candidate.

"He fits the mold of somebody who might be able to pull off a write-in," said McConnell.

Sessions is busy getting grilled by Congress

But Sessions also came under fire before the House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday, where he repeatedly had to defend himself after new revelations in the investigation into the Trump campaign's possible collusion with Russia during the 2016 election.

Sessions blamed sleep deprivation, the "chaos" of the Trump campaign, and his own poor memory for failing to disclose meetings where a young campaign adviser, George Papadopoulos, pitched a meeting between Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

RELATED: Photos of Trump and Sessions

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Donald Trump and Jeff Sessions
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Donald Trump and Jeff Sessions
U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions (R) joins President Donald Trump (L) for an opioid and drug abuse listening session at the White House in Washington, U.S. March 29, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
President Donald Trump speaks with Attorney General Jeff Sessions as they attend the National Peace Officers Memorial Service on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., May 15, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. Senator Jeff Sessions speaks next to U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump at a rally at Madison City Schools Stadium in Madison, Alabama February 28, 2016. REUTERS/Marvin Gentry
U.S. President Donald Trump watches as Vice President Mike Pence (R) swears in Jeff Sessions (L) as U.S. Attorney General while his wife Mary Sessions holds the Bible in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington February 9, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 28: Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., left, endorses Donald Trump to be the Republican nominee for president during a campaign rally at Madison City Schools Stadium in Madison, Ala., February 28, 2016. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
U.S. President Donald Trump congratulates Jeff Sessions after he was sworn in as U.S. Attorney General as his wife Mary Sessions looks on during a ceremony in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, U.S., February 9, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump sits with U.S. Senator Jeff Sessions (R-AL) (L) and retired U.S. Army General Keith Kellogg (R) during a national security meeting with advisors at Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York, U.S., October 7, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a swearing-in ceremony for new Attorney General Jeff Sessions (R) at the White House in Washington, U.S., February 9, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Under a portrait of former President Andrew Jackson, U.S. President Donald Trump (L) congratulates Jeff Sessions after he was sworn in as U.S. Attorney General during a ceremony in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, U.S., February 9, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
President Donald Trump reaches out toward Attorney General Jeff Sessions as they attend the National Peace Officers Memorial Service on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., May 15, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
US President-elect Donald Trump (C) talks with Alabama Governor Robert Bentley (2nd L) and US Attorney General nominee Jeff Sessions (L) as he arrives in Mobile, Alabama, for a 'Thank You Tour 2016' rally on December 17, 2016. / AFP / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
MOBILE, AL - DECEMBER 17: President-elect Donald Trump greets Senator Jeff Sessions, Trump's picks for attorney general, during a thank you rally in Ladd-Peebles Stadium on December 17, 2016 in Mobile, Alabama. President-elect Trump has been visiting several states that he won, to thank people for their support during the U.S. election. (Photo by Mark Wallheiser/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump watches as Vice President Mike Pence (R) swears in Jeff Sessions (L) as U.S. Attorney General while his wife Mary Sessions holds the Bible in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, U.S., February 9, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
MOBILE, AL- AUGUST 21: U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump introduces Alabama Senator Jeff Sessions (R) Mobile during his rally at Ladd-Peebles Stadium on August 21, 2015 in Mobile, Alabama. The Donald Trump campaign moved tonight's rally to a larger stadium to accommodate demand. (Photo by Mark Wallheiser/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump congratulates Jeff Sessions after he was sworn in as U.S. Attorney General as his wife Mary Sessions looks on during a ceremony in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, U.S., February 9, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
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Trump campaign getting grilled over Russia connections

Even closer to home for Trump, his son Donald Trump Jr. became the subject of media attention when The Atlantic published messages between Trump Jr. and Wikileaks, the Russian-linked agency that dogged the Hillary Clinton campaign with wave after wave of damning leaked and pilfered emails.

Though inconclusive to suggest an arrangement between the Trump campaign and Wikileaks, the episode reopened questions into the Trumps' collaboration with shady organizations and Russia.

Trump's tax reform hanging by a thread

Even bigger than Trump, the biggest Republican legislative push, tax reform, has hit a setback. A letter from the Congressional Budget Office pointed out that if a handful of Democrats don't vote to waive a statute that requires tax cuts and other types of legislation to pay for themselves, deep cuts in funding to programs like Medicaid and Border Patrol will follow.

Because the Republican tax plan is expected to raise the deficit by $1.5 trillion over 10 years, the current statute would require $150 billion in cuts to the budget each year. The 52 Senate Republicans would need 60 votes to waive the statute.

The reliance on Democratic support for a conservative tax plan imperils the second major legislative push since the 2016 election ushered in GOP control of Congress and the executive branch.

The first push, a conservative attempt to undo Obamacare, failed spectacularly when Republican Senator John McCain voted against it in the 11th hour.

Failing again would leave Trump with no major reforms accomplished in nearly a year in office, and become a talking point in the looming 2018 midterm elections where Democrats could win back the legislature.

NOW WATCH: Senator Bob Corker slams Trump and says he has 'great difficulty with the truth'

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SEE ALSO: The Republican tax bill could force billions of dollars in cuts to programs like Medicare

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