North Korean state newspaper announces 'death sentence' for Trump

 

A North Korean state newspaper has issued a death sentence for U.S. President Donald Trump after he insulted Kim Jong-Un during his recent trip to Asia, according to the Guardian

An editorial in the ruling party's newspaper Rodong Sinmun declared Trump a "criminal" and said their nation's people had sentenced him to death because of the unflattering way he talks about their country and their supreme leader. 

"The worst crime for which he can never be pardoned is that he dared [to] malignantly hurt the dignity of the supreme leadership," the editorial read. "He should know that he is just a hideous criminal sentenced to death by the Korean people."

The scathing article was in response to comments Trump made during his recent visit to South Korea, where he condemned the North's "cruel dictatorship" in a speech to South Korea’s National Assembly.

During his address, Trump called North Korea, "a hell that no person deserves," and warned that "the weapons you are acquiring are not making you safer. They are putting your regime in grave danger. Every step you take down this dark path increases the peril you face."

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President Trump addresses the National Assembly in South Korea
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President Trump addresses the National Assembly in South Korea
US President Donald Trump (C) addresses the National Assembly in Seoul on November 8, 2017. Trump's marathon Asia tour moves to South Korea, another key ally in the struggle with nuclear-armed North Korea, but one with deep reservations about the US president's strategy for dealing with the crisis. / AFP PHOTO / Lee Jin-man (Photo credit should read LEE JIN-MAN/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump (C) addresses the National Assembly in Seoul on November 8, 2017. Trump's marathon Asia tour moves to South Korea, another key ally in the struggle with nuclear-armed North Korea, but one with deep reservations about the US president's strategy for dealing with the crisis. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the South Korean National Assembly in Seoul, South Korea, November 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
US President Donald Trump (C) applauds at the of his speech to the National Assembly in Seoul on November 8, 2017. Trump's marathon Asia tour moves to South Korea, another key ally in the struggle with nuclear-armed North Korea, but one with deep reservations about the US president's strategy for dealing with the crisis. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Members of the National Assembly listen to US President Donald Trump (not pictured) delivering his addresses in Seoul on November 8, 2017. Trump's marathon Asia tour moves to South Korea, another key ally in the struggle with nuclear-armed North Korea, but one with deep reservations about the US president's strategy for dealing with the crisis. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the South Korean National Assembly in Seoul, South Korea, November 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
US President Donald Trump (C) addresses the National Assembly in Seoul on November 8, 2017. Trump's marathon Asia tour moves to South Korea, another key ally in the struggle with nuclear-armed North Korea, but one with deep reservations about the US president's strategy for dealing with the crisis. / AFP PHOTO / Lee Jin-man (Photo credit should read LEE JIN-MAN/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump (C) addresses the National Assembly in Seoul on November 8, 2017. Trump's marathon Asia tour moves to South Korea, another key ally in the struggle with nuclear-armed North Korea, but one with deep reservations about the US president's strategy for dealing with the crisis. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Pro-Trump supporters wave the US flags during a rally welcoming US President Donald Trump's visit near the National Assembly in Seoul on November 8, 2017 as Trump is due to address the South Korea's national assembly. North Korea poses a worldwide threat that needs worldwide action, President Donald Trump said in Seoul November 7, but insisted 'we are making a lot of progress' in reining in the rogue state. / AFP PHOTO / JUNG YEON-JE (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)
Pro-Trump supporters hold placards showing portraits of US President Donald Trump (L) and South Korean President Moon Jae-In (R) during a rally welcoming Trump's visit near the National Assembly in Seoul on November 8, 2017 as Trump is due to address the South Korea's national assembly. North Korea poses a worldwide threat that needs worldwide action, President Donald Trump said in Seoul November 7, but insisted 'we are making a lot of progress' in reining in the rogue state. / AFP PHOTO / JUNG YEON-JE (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the South Korean National Assembly in Seoul, South Korea, November 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Anti-Trump protesters hold signs near the South Korean National Assembly where U.S. President Donald Trump is due to speak, in Seoul, South Korea, November 8, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
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"Do not underestimate us, and do not try us," the U.S. President added. "We will defend our common security, our shared prosperity, and our sacred liberty."

The editorial also took aim at the fact that Trump skipped a planned visit to the demilitarized border zone between North and South Korea due to inclement weather.

"It wasn’t the weather. He was just too scared to face the glaring eyes of our troops," the article said. 

Days after his South Korea visit, Trump again insulted Kim Jong-Un, calling the dictator "short and fat" in a controversial tweet.

 

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